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Ruth2
08-11-2009, 08:26 AM
I've invented a name for a Chateau in the Languedoc. In English the name is "Chateau of the Dead Loves." Would that in French be rendered-- "Chateau des Mort Amours" or "Chateau des Mort-d'Amours" or something else?

Any help is most appreciated. Thanks!

backslashbaby
08-11-2009, 09:07 AM
Des Amours Mortes, I believe. But I also don't know if that would have a different connotation in French, as things often do ;)

Can I just say the Languedoc rocks, btw?!! ;)

Sarpedon
08-11-2009, 05:01 PM
I think its relevant to ask whether it is the love that is dead, or the beloved that is dead?

Ruth2
08-11-2009, 05:42 PM
backslashbaby: Have you been? If so, what'd you like best there? We're going next month-- gonna eat, drink and be merry!

Sarpedon: Good question. "Castle of the Dead Beloveds". Or "beloved Dead". Anyway, the beloved who are dead, and not the love itself. Although having the love itself dead is appealing ..

Thanks y'all!

Raindrop
08-11-2009, 07:43 PM
Château des Amours Mortes, yes.
Beautiful name, by the way, and it would translate as Dead Loves, imho.

Horseshoes
08-11-2009, 10:28 PM
CdAM= the love (emotion) is dead, not the loved persons (who are known as aimees or cherites--and I haven't placed the diacriticals as my keyboard commands don't work here))

Given that your chateau is named for dead beloved people, the CdAM title is not correct.But it is lovely.

TabithaTodd
08-11-2009, 10:35 PM
Le château des Morts Aime

(direct translation, francophone Quebecer here)

On another note: http://translation2.paralink.com/

Great little translator.

Doug Johnson
08-11-2009, 10:40 PM
I believe you need to specify whether the lover is male or female.

TabithaTodd
08-11-2009, 10:51 PM
I believe you need to specify whether the lover is male or female.

Not when it comes to things or places. Only when it comes to possession or persons.

Ruth2
08-11-2009, 10:56 PM
I was thinking of people. Lots of dead people there who were beloved. Still are.

Thanks all!

backslashbaby
08-11-2009, 11:31 PM
I've been, and it's all wonderful. Drink the local wine, look at the architecture, talk to the old men, and pet the cats at the cafes :D That's kind of my general advice for France, I think!

Oooo, and always buy the pastries [try the millefeuilles (sp?)] :D Have a great time!

Doug Johnson
08-12-2009, 12:50 AM
Not when it comes to things or places. Only when it comes to possession or persons.

I'm assuming the deceased had sex with the chateau's owner, not the chateau. Anyway, that's one reason I like the English language; the noun is the same do matter who it had sex with.

Ruth2
08-12-2009, 01:23 AM
Doug Johnson: Sex with a chateau. Now there's a thought!

backslashbaby: We plan to do all that and more! Gonna stomp around some old chateau museums (Fitou, etc) and buy wine for everyone for Christmas and ship it home. I hope.... And pig out on pastries. It'll ruin my diet but c'est la vie!

Thanks y'all!

Ms Hollands
08-12-2009, 11:44 PM
Just asked my French blokey and he said it's a hard one in French. The best he could come up with is:

le chateau des morts aimés

...but he pointed out that it's not clear whether they were once loved or if they've loved now.

...and he also pointed out it sounds a little wierd — but poetic — in French!

I'm more of a specialist on French pastries. Try a torsade (chocolate chips and custard twisted in with pastry) if you like pastries. For extra-creamy goodness, try a Tropezianne (sp?) - they're delicious. Well, everything is great anyway!

Ruth2
08-12-2009, 11:49 PM
Hey April Hollands!

Leave it to me to come up with a odd one.... <sigh>. Thanks for the info on the French.:)

And thanks for the French pastries info. Tropezianne--- from St Tropez perhaps? They sounds awesome. If I find them, I'll certainly try them.

Thanks!

Ms Hollands
08-13-2009, 12:01 AM
Spot on - they're from St Tropez. Tropezienne, I think. Clearly, I'll have to head down to my local boulangerie and buy one just so I can see how it's spelt...

Richard White
08-13-2009, 12:02 AM
Then again, I love the SCA name for Des Moines, IA

Couer d' Ennui

(Heart of Boredom)

ideagirl
08-19-2009, 10:59 PM
backslashbaby: Have you been? If so, what'd you like best there? We're going next month-- gonna eat, drink and be merry!

Sarpedon: Good question. "Castle of the Dead Beloveds". Or "beloved Dead". Anyway, the beloved who are dead, and not the love itself. Although having the love itself dead is appealing ..

Thanks y'all!

"...des Amours Mortes" would be correct because amour has the bizarre feature of being masculine in the singular, but feminine in the plural. However, that does mean "dead loves" in the sense that the love is dead. In English "dead loves" might be a synonym for "beloved dead," but not so much in French.

So to give it the meaning you intend, you would need to call it something like "Chateau des Morts Bien-Aimes" (accent aigu on the final e), but that really sounds weird. Tabitha's suggestion ("Le château des Morts Aime") would be correct if aime had an accent aigu on the final e and an s on the end, and it's not bad; it's better than bien-aime, despite what your French-English dictionary may tell you when you look up "beloved."

Oh, but here's another option: Chateau des Morts Adores (again, accent aigu on the final e). That means "chateau of the dead who were adored." That version sounds way, way better in French than Chateau des Morts Bien-Aimes, partly because of the sonority (morts adores works very well), and partly because of the vocabulary: beloved usually is translated as bien-aime, but bien-aime is too tepid a word to modify death--you need something more passionate or intense, or else the name just sounds off kilter and unnatural. So go with Chateau des Morts Adores, or if you're not looking for a passionate-sounding name--if you're thinking of more tender love rather than passionate love--then go with Chateau des Morts Aimes.

ideagirl
08-19-2009, 11:08 PM
I was thinking of people. Lots of dead people there who were beloved. Still are.

Thanks all!

Unless the people were all women (in which case it would be Mortes Adorees or Morts Aimees), you'd use the masculine plural: Morts Adores/Aimes.