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kit7p
07-15-2009, 06:34 AM
I was wondering what government agency would have the jurisdiction to investigate the murder of a foreign political figure in the U.S. Would it be the FBI, the CIA, the Secret Service...or any other agency I can't think of? Or would the murder need to be more specific?

Horseshoes
07-15-2009, 10:27 PM
The murder *location* would need to be more specific.

Rabe
07-15-2009, 10:49 PM
I was wondering what government agency would have the jurisdiction to investigate the murder of a foreign political figure in the U.S. Would it be the FBI, the CIA, the Secret Service...or any other agency I can't think of? Or would the murder need to be more specific?

Most likely the secret service as they are tasked with the Diplomatic Security Services division.

Rabe...

bagels
07-15-2009, 11:09 PM
You would also probably have a team from the foreign nation involved as well.

It's a complicated area, but I know there are some books out there on the subject - might be worth tracking down.

kit7p
07-16-2009, 01:10 AM
Thanks, guys.

Rowan
07-16-2009, 04:01 AM
My guess would be the FBI... I'm 99% sure that the USSS doesn't investigate homicides (regardless of the location/circumstances) nor does the CIA (intelligence agency) but I may be wrong on both counts. I can only say with 100% certainty that it won't be the DEA. Hope that helps!
Oh, and if said murder occurred on embassy grounds -- different ball game.

[From USSS website]:
What legal authority and powers do Secret Service agents have?

Under Title 18, Section 3056, of the United States Code, agents and officers of the United States Secret Service can:


Carry firearms
Execute warrants issued under the laws of the United States
Make arrests without warrants for any offense against the United States committed in their presence, or for any felony recognizable under the laws of the United States if they have reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed such felony
Offer and pay rewards for services and information leading to the apprehension of persons involved in the violation of the law that the Secret Service is authorized to enforce
Investigate fraud in connection with identification documents, fraudulent commerce, fictitious instruments and foreign securities and
Perform other functions and duties authorized by law
The Secret Service works closely with the United States Attorney's Office in both protective and investigative matters.

kit7p
07-16-2009, 06:41 AM
Thanks, Rowan. I was on that website too and it said "and other actions permitted by law" or something like that, so that didn't answer my question. That's why I posted here.:)

Rowan
07-17-2009, 12:59 AM
Thanks, Rowan. I was on that website too and it said "and other actions permitted by law" or something like that, so that didn't answer my question. That's why I posted here.:)

Sorry, just trying to be helpful! Next time I'll just assume the poster has checked all websites... Anyway, the following info/link may be of help. If not --- Good luck. ;)


INVESTIGATIVE JURISDICTION

When reportable deaths occur, certain state and federal agencies by law and
regulation must be notified when the death is related to their area of specialty...


Federal Bureau of Investigations

Federal Criminal Laws- Possible assertion of Federal investigative jurisdiction
(with suspension of state and local jurisdiction) 18 US code 1751(1965) 612-376-
3200
The FBI/Secret Service has authority to investigate the death of the President,
President-elect, Vice President, Vice President-elect, any member of Congress or
member of Congress-elect, or appointed presidential staff that dies unexpectedly
or due to trauma. The FBI may request assistance from any local, state or
federal agency. 18 US code 351(1970) covers congressional, cabinet and
Supreme Court assassinations, kidnapping and assault. 18 US code 1116 (1972)
applies for foreign officials, official guests or internationally protected persons. http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00001116----000-.html

RJK
07-17-2009, 06:00 PM
Murder is a crime under State laws. Assuming the homicide occurred outside the embassy grounds, the local police, assisted by the FBI and the Embassy security officials would investigate.

smcc360
07-17-2009, 11:53 PM
If this is about the story you posted in SYW, in which the murder was committed in New York City, the murder would be investigated by the NYPD. Fortunately, they have the best homicide detectives in the world. The assassination of a foreign head of state would have dozens of detectives working it.

The FBI would manage to insert themselves into the investigation, of course. Their access to resources (money and personnel) would be a good complement to the NYC detectives, but the two agencies don't get along. The situation is exacerbated by the current police commissioner and his staff, none of whom have much use for the feds.

The most likely scenario would involve a multi-agency task force, composed of the New York City Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Diplomatic Security Service, the United States Secret Service, the New York State Police, Scotland Yard, and whatever other agencies are responsible for any jurisdiction to which the investigation leads. The could concievably wind up being sevwral hundred investigators, broken up into numerous smaller teams whose actvities would be coordinated out of the Commissioner's office at One Police Plaza. Teams would be assigned leads based on authority, expertise, and jurisdiction.

Tsu Dho Nimh
07-18-2009, 05:11 AM
I was wondering what government agency would have the jurisdiction to investigate the murder of a foreign political figure in the U.S. Would it be the FBI, the CIA, the Secret Service...or any other agency I can't think of? Or would the murder need to be more specific?

Depends on EXACTLY where they are killed, and what rank they have in their country.

Or, it depends on which agency your plot needs to have involved ... we can tell you where the murder has to take place.

kit7p
07-18-2009, 06:57 AM
Okay, thanks, guys, this is soooo much help.:)





Depends on EXACTLY where they are killed, and what rank they have in their country.

Or, it depends on which agency your plot needs to have involved ... we can tell you where the murder has to take place.



Uhhh...we were hoping to have the agency be the Secret Service...so then where would it need to take place??

Lucky Jim
07-19-2009, 04:28 AM
Why was the person murdered? Is it a 'Whodunit?' a 'Whydunit?' or a 'Howdunit? The answer to those questions might help you. As I understand it, the CIA is not supposed to interfere in internal matters, but would this apply to a murder committed on Embassy property? If all the agencies mentioned have a stake in the outcome, there could be unofficial enquiries leading to conflict. Conflict good.

Lucky Jim

suki
07-19-2009, 05:14 AM
Okay, thanks, guys, this is soooo much help.:)

Uhhh...we were hoping to have the agency be the Secret Service...so then where would it need to take place??

My understanding is that in no murder would the Secret Service be the lead investigative agency.

They might be consulted or be partly involved if there were financial aspects or as a preventive measure to protect someone in their care who might also be in danger, but murder is generally not the Secret Service's jurisdiction from my understanding of things.

~suki

Tsu Dho Nimh
07-19-2009, 05:18 AM
Uhhh...we were hoping to have the agency be the Secret Service...so then where would it need to take place??

What types of crimes does the Secret Service investigate?

The Secret Service has primary jurisdiction to investigate threats against Secret Service protectees as well as financial crimes, which include counterfeiting of U.S. currency or other U.S. Government obligations; forgery or theft of U.S. Treasury checks, bonds or other securities; credit card fraud; telecommunications fraud; computer fraud, identify fraud and certain other crimes affecting federally insured financial institutions.

Today, the Secret Service's mission is two-fold: protection of the president, vice president and others; and investigations into crimes against the financial infrastructure of the United States.


What legal authority and powers do Secret Service agents have?

Under Title 18, Section 3056, of the United States Code, agents and officers of the United States Secret Service can:
Carry firearms
Execute warrants issued under the laws of the United States
Make arrests without warrants for any offense against the United States committed in their presence, or for any felony recognizable under the laws of the United States if they have reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed such felony
Offer and pay rewards for services and information leading to the apprehension of persons involved in the violation of the law that the Secret Service is authorized to enforce
Investigate fraud in connection with identification documents, fraudulent commerce, fictitious instruments and foreign securities and
Perform other functions and duties authorized by law The Secret Service works closely with the United States Attorney's Office in both protective and investigative matters.
**************

Here's how to get them involved. Have the victim, or the main suspect, be involved in one of the crimes they do investigate. They would be partly bumped by the local law and the FBI, but they would be doing their specialty.

kit7p
07-19-2009, 10:31 PM
Alright, thanks guys.

Gatita
07-22-2009, 07:30 AM
My friend's relative was a foreign diplomat killed in the US.

FBI.

Local cops might start it but then the FBI would take over.

And by way, even in murder investigations not involving foreign or political figures, I've seen the FBI take the investigation away from local cops if they want it.

kit7p
07-23-2009, 04:26 AM
Thanks.:)