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Exir
06-30-2009, 12:36 PM
Who are your favorite composers for music? And, if you're inclined, what are your reasons for liking them, musically?

I'll start. I like Hans Zimmer because of his world music. James Newton Howard is pretty "old school" in a good way. Danny Elfman was already awesome with Tim Burton's Batman, but what truly showed his stuff was his score for "Charlotte's Web". James Horner would've been good if he wasn't so bent on plaigarising himself. His score for A Beautiful Mind was wonderful, especially his "Kaleidoscope of Mathematics" theme. Too bad he copied some themes to his other works. Can't get into some of John Williams' scores -- sometimes his music is pretentious and draws attention to himself. Other times, however, like Schindler's List and Fiddler on the Roof, he writes genuine, heartfelt music.

Zoombie
06-30-2009, 12:50 PM
Basil Poledouris.

His music for Conan and Starship Troopers are the most awesomly epic set of musics I've ever heard. And Robocop has an awesome main theme.

His music is as intense and bloody and awesome as the movies he wrote for!

som1luvsmi
06-30-2009, 12:57 PM
Danny Elfman.

Especially "The Little Things" from Wanted.

It totally inspired my WIP.

Kathleen42
06-30-2009, 02:37 PM
Clint Mansell - especially when he teams up with the Kronos Quartet. Thomas Newman. His scores are never bad and he's done some very nifty things - especially with A Series of Unfortunate Events. I adore some of Danny Elfman's scores but they sometimes feel a little repetitive.

Kurtz
06-30-2009, 02:47 PM
Popol Vuh (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1u7vzaqITMA)
Brad Fiedel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpwWYOE3Y9o)
Mark Lindsay and W. Michael Lewis (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LSeAMDI-88) (I can't get over how awesome this is)

10er
06-30-2009, 03:21 PM
Michael Nyman blew me away in Gattaca.

Harry Gregson-Williams was especially great in Kingdom of Heaven (and Metal Gear Solid).

Oh and John Carpenter does some pretty mean things with a synthesizer... if you're into that kind of stuff.

Exir
06-30-2009, 03:33 PM
Drats... The title should be "film/TV" not "film/movie"

Keep the replies coming!

Noah Body
06-30-2009, 04:37 PM
Jerry Goldsmith...the master, and one of the most innovative composers ever. He's been dead for five years, and no one's taken his place yet.

Jō Hisaishi.

Joel McNeely.

James Newton Howard.

Basil Poledouris.

Elmer Bernstein.

Hans Zimmer, though in the beginning his scores all sounded the same...Crimson Tide was a rehash of Backdraft, but he got over that. And at least he didn't outright steal other scores, like James Horner did throughout the 1980s. The Last Samurai has some really stirring themes, even though the movie itself was a total cliche circus.

Michael Kamen.

John Williams...though his signature is so strong that I haven't really listened to much of his stuff since 1990. He is to musical innovation now what Mount Rushmore is to animation, to borrow a phrase.

Shigeru Umebayashi.

(Interesting how half the folks on my list are dead. :) )

Kurtz
06-30-2009, 04:47 PM
Michael Nyman blew me away in Gattaca.

Harry Gregson-Williams was especially great in Kingdom of Heaven (and Metal Gear Solid).

Oh and John Carpenter does some pretty mean things with a synthesizer... if you're into that kind of stuff.

It was Ennio Morricone who did the awesome synth stuff for The Thing, I think he and Carpenter had quite a few collaborations like that, a real good choice in picking him though.

maestrowork
06-30-2009, 04:55 PM
Ennio Morricone -- he's a God.

Dario Marianelli -- he so deserved the Oscar for Atonement, and the other scores I've heard (Pride & Prejudice and The Soloist) are sublime.

Alexandre Desplat -- amazing. Recommendations: Lust, Caution, Birth, and the Painted Veil.

My other favorites include John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Thomas Newman, Danny Elfman, Jerry Goldsmith, Michael Giacchino and at times Phillip Glass (his repetitive stuff is hypnotic sometimes).

Kris
06-30-2009, 04:55 PM
I don't follow this stuff as closely as some of you, but often when I notice I like a score, it turns out to be by Hans Zimmer. And will second whoever said Morricone.

I also tend to like John Barry and the old timer who did the score for the original "Cape Fear," a guy named Bernard Hermann. (I watch a lot of old movies).

Also, I thought Neil Young's score for Dead Man was outrageously good.

Kathleen42
06-30-2009, 05:01 PM
Jō Hisaishi.



I can't believe I forgot him!

Noah Body
06-30-2009, 05:07 PM
Good to know I'm not the only person who knows who he is. ;)

Kathleen42
06-30-2009, 05:15 PM
Good to know I'm not the only person who knows who he is. ;)

The score for Laputa is just gorgeous. I admit, though, that I'm only familiar with his work with Miyazaki.

Noah Body
06-30-2009, 05:29 PM
Check out his works with Takeshi Kitano...Hana-Bi, Sonatine, and for a more languid approach punctuated with action, Brother.

childeroland
07-01-2009, 01:42 AM
Hans Zimmer
Rachel Portman
Thomas Newman
James Newton Howard
Zbigniew Preisner
Joe Hisaishi
Yuki Kajiura

AuburnAssassin
07-01-2009, 01:48 AM
Thomas Newman. His scores are never bad and he's done some very nifty things - especially with A Series of Unfortunate Events.

Love Thomas Newman's stuff, Unfortunate Events among them as well as Six Feet Under and American Beauty. His stuff is very distinctive; I can almost always pick it out.

His relative (cousin? uncle?) Randy Newman is not so bad either, if you overlook Short People. I love his scores to the Natural and Toy Story.

John Williams is noteworthy as well. (Love his Witches of Eastwick score)

Vangelis has also done some awesome scores--Chariots of Fire, Cosmos, Blade Runner, The Bounty, Missing, Antarctica and several foreign films.

Clannad for Robin Hood, Theme from Harry's Game

Kris
07-01-2009, 01:55 AM
His relative (cousin? uncle?) Randy Newman is not so bad either, if you overlook Short People. I love his scores to the Natural and Toy Story.



Poor Randy Newman, doomed to be known forever for what's probably the worst song he ever wrote!

regdog
07-01-2009, 02:13 AM
Ennio Morricone-The Mission is brilliant
James Horner-Braveheart was a great soundtrack

Smish
07-01-2009, 02:24 AM
Dario Marianelli is my current fave. His music is beautiful. Classic, but inventive and fresh.

maestrowork
07-01-2009, 02:30 AM
James Horner-Braveheart was a great soundtrack

Except he's been copying himself for the past 10 years or so.

Noah Body
07-01-2009, 03:10 AM
Shoot, he did that in 1985 when he took motifs from Star Trek II and used them in Cocoon.

Oh wait...ST II was a rehash of Wolfen. My bad.

shawkins
07-01-2009, 05:28 AM
Basil Poledouris.

What he said. If the pack and I ever get around to raiding an enemy subdivision I'm totally going to blast Anvil of Crom out of the War Honda when we attack. It's good smiting music.

Wavy_Blue
07-01-2009, 08:49 AM
Adding Michael Giacchino.

I LOVE the scores for Lost, Star Trek, Up, and The Incredibles. He's so versatile.

SirOtter
07-01-2009, 09:15 AM
Max Steiner
Elmer Bernstein
John Barry
Ennio Morricone
Bernard Herrmann
John Williams

dgiharris
07-01-2009, 09:25 AM
I'll jump on the Hans Zimmer bandwagon. His soundtracks have literally DEFINED movies, not the other way around :)

I also loved the soundtrack for Hero, Tan Dun. His music transported you to another era.

Also, in terms of a random shout out. The soundtrack for Lion King is another one that sorta sticks with you. Actually, Disney in general had some very catchy little tunes in their cartoons. Little Mermaid "You gotta kiss dee girl" :D

That is one thing I sorta mix about animation that Pixar doesn't really do. Those little Disney songs are great balls of fun that really help enhance the animation.

Mel...

Exir
07-02-2009, 04:38 PM
Revisited Ennio Morricone. This guy truly is awesome. His music never call attention to themselves; they just lie quietly in the background, doing their magic. Even when it is all loud and pompous, it still keeps that quality.

Smileycat
07-04-2009, 05:21 AM
There is good in almost every score I've heard. My favorite all-time composer is Bernard Herrmann, who did the music for the following films:

1941 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_in_film)
Citizen Kane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Kane)

The Devil and Daniel Webster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Devil_and_Daniel_Webster)

also known as All That Money Can Buy
1942 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1942_in_film)
The Magnificent Ambersons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magnificent_Ambersons_(film))
1944 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1944_in_film)
Jane Eyre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Eyre_(1944_film))
1945 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945_in_film)
Hangover Square (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangover_Square_(film))
1946 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1946_in_film)
Anna and the King of Siam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_and_the_King_of_Siam_(film))
1947 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1947_in_film)
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ghost_and_Mrs._Muir)
1948 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1948_in_film)
Portrait of Jennie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_Jennie)
1951 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1951_in_film)
The Day the Earth Stood Still (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_the_Earth_Stood_Still_(1951_film))

On Dangerous Ground (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Dangerous_Ground)
1952 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1952_in_film)
5 Fingers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5_Fingers)

The Snows of Kilimanjaro (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Snows_of_Kilimanjaro_(film))
1953 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_in_film)
White Witch Doctor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Witch_Doctor_(film))

Beneath the 12-Mile Reef (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_the_12-Mile_Reef)

King of the Khyber Rifles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_of_the_Khyber_Rifles)
1954 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1954_in_film)
Garden of Evil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_Evil)

The Egyptian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Egyptian_(film))

Prince of Players (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_of_Players)
1955 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1955_in_film)
The Trouble with Harry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trouble_with_Harry)

The Kentuckian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Kentuckian)
1956 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1956_in_film)
The Man Who Knew Too Much (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Knew_Too_Much_(1956_film))

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_in_the_Gray_Flannel_Suit)

The Wrong Man (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wrong_Man)

Williamsburg: the Story of a Patriot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williamsburg:_the_Story_of_a_Patriot)
1957 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1957_in_film)
A Hatful of Rain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Hatful_of_Rain)
1958 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1958_in_film)
Vertigo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertigo_(film))

The Naked and the Dead (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Naked_and_the_Dead)

The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seventh_Voyage_of_Sinbad)
1959 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1959_in_film)
North by Northwest (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_by_Northwest)

Blue Denim (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Denim)

Journey to the Center of the Earth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journey_to_the_Center_of_the_Earth_(1959_film))
1960 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1960_in_film)
Psycho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psycho_(1960_film))

The Three Worlds of Gulliver (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Worlds_of_Gulliver)
1961 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_in_film)
Mysterious Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysterious_Island_(1961_film))
1962 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1962_in_film)
Tender Is the Night (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tender_Is_the_Night_(1962_film))

Cape Fear (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Fear_(1962_film))
1963 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1963_in_film)
Jason and the Argonauts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason_and_the_Argonauts_(film))

The Birds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Birds)
1964 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1964_in_film)
Marnie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marnie_(film))
1965 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1965_in_film)
Joy in the Morning (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joy_in_the_Morning_(film))
1966 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_in_film)
Torn Curtain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torn_Curtain)

Fahrenheit 451 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit_451_(1966_film))
1968 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_in_film)
The Bride Wore Black (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bride_Wore_Black)

Twisted Nerve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisted_Nerve)
1969 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1969_in_film)
The Battle of Neretva (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Battle_of_Neretva)
1971 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1971_in_film)
The Night Digger

The Battle of Neretva (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Battle_of_Neretva)

Endless Night (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endless_Night)
1973 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1973_in_film)
Sisters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisters_(film))
1974 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1974_in_film)
It's Alive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_Alive_(film))
1976 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1976_in_film)
Obsession (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsession_(film))

Taxi Driver (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxi_Driver)


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Herrmann

He was dramatic, and knew just what a piece needed. He was the greatest.

Here's to you, Mr. Herrmann!

childeroland
07-04-2009, 05:43 AM
A little OT: Speaking of Tan Dun -- to anyone who is a figure skating fan, does anyone know the name of the piece he composed which used to be so popular among singles men and women skaters? Maybe 8-10 years ago? The Green Dragon Rises, or something like that?

childeroland
07-04-2009, 05:45 AM
I should have added Nino Rota as a favorite.

Adelaide
07-04-2009, 08:55 AM
Howard Shore. The Lord of the Rings soundtracks remain, collectively, some of the most evocative pieces of music in my life.

Zoombie
07-04-2009, 12:44 PM
James Horner is also a favorite of mine...if only cause I <3 his work in the Rocketeer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzNhQefDvH0).

donroc
07-04-2009, 03:40 PM
Many of those mentioned, but in my top three is Robert Raksin for the themes alone from Laura and the Bad and the Beautiful.

VinsenMDV
07-05-2009, 10:05 AM
At the moment, it's Steve Jablonsky, Harry Gregson-Williams, and James Newton Howard.

Epiphany
07-05-2009, 10:39 AM
At the moment, it's Steve Jablonsky, Harry Gregson-Williams, and James Newton Howard.


Oh my god. I love you.

Those are my exact top 3. I think that Steve Jablonsky is a freaking genius and my first reason why I go to see Michael Bay movies. My favorite piece by him is "Arrival to Earth" from Transformers

Harry Gregson-Williams is great with themes. My favorite piece by him is "The Battle" from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.

And of course James Newton Howard is classic... I think that some of his finest works rests in all of the M. Night movies. The soundtrack for The Village is incredible, as well as the one for Lady in the Water.

I also wanna add to the list Michael Giacchino, Clint Mansell, Howard Shore, Hans Zimmer, and Harald Kloser.

And you can't forget the musical geniuses who make up Two Steps from Hell. I know technically they don't do movies, but they do movie trailers, and that is JUST as important! :D

I have to be honest... I am not that big of a fan of Danny Elfman with the exception of Wanted.

VinsenMDV
07-05-2009, 01:55 PM
Oh my god. I love you.

Those are my exact top 3. I think that Steve Jablonsky is a freaking genius and my first reason why I go to see Michael Bay movies. My favorite piece by him is "Arrival to Earth" from Transformers

Harry Gregson-Williams is great with themes. My favorite piece by him is "The Battle" from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.

And of course James Newton Howard is classic... I think that some of his finest works rests in all of the M. Night movies. The soundtrack for The Village is incredible, as well as the one for Lady in the Water.

I also wanna add to the list Michael Giacchino, Clint Mansell, Howard Shore, Hans Zimmer, and Harald Kloser.

And you can't forget the musical geniuses who make up Two Steps from Hell. I know technically they don't do movies, but they do movie trailers, and that is JUST as important! :D

I have to be honest... I am not that big of a fan of Danny Elfman with the exception of Wanted.

Giacchino's really versatile. You can always recognize his style, but his works sound different from one thing to the next (Lost, the new Star Trek, M:I 3). Hans Zimmer's Lion King score is one of the best scores ever! And I agree about JNH, I really like his Lady in the Water score.

Jablonsky's Transformers music kicked major ass the first time I heard it (although I don't feel his work on Transformers 2 was as good). He does good at setting atmosphere with his themes (like The Hitcher, the Friday the 13th remake, Texas Chainsaw Massacre).

Elfman's music is okay, but not remarkable. However, I am digging his Terminator Salvation soundtrack at the moment.

maestrowork
07-05-2009, 08:27 PM
Giacchino's really versatile. You can always recognize his style, but his works sound different from one thing to the next (Lost, the new Star Trek, M:I 3). Hans Zimmer's Lion King score is one of the best scores ever! And I agree about JNH, I really like his Lady in the Water score.


Don't forget the Pixar stuff such as Ratatouille, UP and the Incredibles. He's come a long way since his video game days.

The Lion King's score still is one of Disney's best. It also worked well with Elton John's songs.

Speaking of Disney and Pixar, Jerry Goldsmith's score of Mulan is sublime, majestic and cinematic. It's the "classical masterpiece" of our days.

Epiphany
07-06-2009, 04:54 AM
Jablonsky's Transformers music kicked major ass the first time I heard it (although I don't feel his work on Transformers 2 was as good). He does good at setting atmosphere with his themes (like The Hitcher, the Friday the 13th remake, Texas Chainsaw Massacre).



I agree that it wasn't nearly as good, although I love how the composition of Nest involved Linkin Park. I thought that was pretty cool. There were a couple of other tracks that stood out, but all in all, not nearly as good as the first one.

blacbird
07-06-2009, 07:11 AM
SirOtter just beat me to Elmer Bernstein. From the sheer brilliant thunder of The Magnificent Seven to the quiet haunting of To Kill a Mockingbird, the guy had his finger on the musical pulse of every movie he ever did scores for.

And, speaking of classics, it would be remiss not to mention Dmitri Tiomkin's score for Gary Cooper's High Noon.

caw

Noah Body
07-06-2009, 05:02 PM
Speaking of Disney and Pixar, Jerry Goldsmith's score of Mulan is sublime, majestic and cinematic. It's the "classical masterpiece" of our days.

How odd, I was just listening to that yesterday! Goldsmith always had a keen ear for integrating ethnic instrumentation into a score. Of course, I backed up Mulan with First Blood for some more octane. :)