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Cassiopeia
06-28-2009, 01:27 AM
My son, just passed his GED requirements without studying for it...got very high scores AND his high school is applying it to a full year of high school and he's continuing of for his high school diploma though he just got the equivalent of one.

I'm so proud of him. He's taking charge and he's not giving up. I always believed he'd do it when it came time to. He's finally stopped buying into the idea that his disabilities are too much to overcome. He's finally believed me and the school district that he's a very smart and fast car...just had to pump up that one flat tire.


vrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrooooooooooooom. I'm off to take him to his favorite place to celebrate.

TheIT
06-28-2009, 01:34 AM
Congratulations to your son! Good luck on the diploma!

:partyguy:

som1luvsmi
06-28-2009, 01:36 AM
That's great news, Cass! Tell your son congrats from me. :)

fairy86
06-28-2009, 01:38 AM
That's awesome, Cass!

Williebee
06-28-2009, 01:40 AM
Outstanding! Congrats to him and you.

"Do the next thing."

spamwarrior
06-28-2009, 01:48 AM
That's awesome!!! Celebrate well... you have cause to
=D i'm so happy to hear that!

Cassiopeia
06-28-2009, 02:33 AM
Thanks guys! He is so busy not realizing what a huge thing this is because his dad doesn't think it means anything. He sees it as a failure because my son didn't get that "high school" diploma but rather an equivalency degree.

But his face lit up when we went to eat and I handed him a hundred bucks and said...well done! This is a big deal...get excited.

Up until that moment he hadn't even smiled about it. LOL ...money talks ..oh yeah!

spamwarrior
06-28-2009, 02:42 AM
Oh yeah, it sure does!

Susie
06-28-2009, 02:47 AM
That is super news, Cassi. Very happy for you and your son. Calls for :Cake:!

regdog
06-28-2009, 02:55 AM
:hooray::hooray:

roonil_wazlib
06-29-2009, 08:30 PM
:partyguy:

Yay! Congrats to you both!

NeuroFizz
06-29-2009, 09:18 PM
The sense of accomplishment can feed back on several parts of our lives. Hurray for him. Here's hoping that accomplishment has many tentacles.

Medievalist
06-29-2009, 09:35 PM
Thanks guys! He is so busy not realizing what a huge thing this is because his dad doesn't think it means anything. He sees it as a failure because my son didn't get that "high school" diploma but rather an equivalency degree.

Actually, it is a big deal. If he's interested in college--this is the sort of thing that you want college admissions boards to know about, btw. And college is often easier to cope with for students with challenges; there's less of an interest in forcing everyone to learn the same way.

Calla Lily
06-29-2009, 09:41 PM
Congratulations!

stormie
06-29-2009, 09:44 PM
That's good news, Cass! Hope you had a great time celebrating.

Wayne K
06-29-2009, 10:24 PM
Good for both of you Cass. I'm sure you were a good influence. As a disabled person I know how easy it is to allow myself to buy into it until the idea is the main disability.

Alpha Echo
06-29-2009, 10:30 PM
Aw, yay! I'm so happy for you and your son. That's wonderful news!

Cassiopeia
06-29-2009, 10:33 PM
Actually, it is a big deal. If he's interested in college--this is the sort of thing that you want college admissions boards to know about, btw. And college is often easier to cope with for students with challenges; there's less of an interest in forcing everyone to learn the same way.He is interested in college. He's just terrified he'll be treated the way he was in traditional high school. He can apply his GED towards a full year of high school to get that "diploma" but I've been trying to explain to him that college is so much better and right now, the local two year college would snap him up in a heart beat and put him in with councilors who will work with him and help him learn how to give his instructors what they want to know about how he's learning. He honestly could have passed this GED at the age of 12.

He works for his father, and the heart breaking thing is, he was just told he could get only get a raise now with a "real high school diploma". It's been a very long, hard and emotional weekend for him.


The sense of accomplishment can feed back on several parts of our lives. Hurray for him. Here's hoping that accomplishment has many tentacles.He's so awesome, Rich. You'd take to him so fast. He loves science. Particularly the oceans.


Thanks everyone for your support. I wish I could some how get through to him that honestly, he's the most dynamic, intelligent person I know. And on top of it, he's a really nice person. He is kind to everyone. So it really upsets me when he gets treated badly.

Cranky
06-29-2009, 10:39 PM
*hugs* to you, Cassie, and a big, hearty CONGRATS! to your son. :) He sounds a lot like my brother (who, he might be interested to know, also has "only" a GED and is currently attending college himself), who is one of the smartest folks I know, but is also convinced he's not that bright. Nevermind the fact that he was in a program for the gifted...that's just his personality and always has been (he's going to be 30 this year).

Hopefully, your son *will* give college a try, because I believe it will do so much to boost his self-confidence. I'm sorry his father is being so dismissive of his accomplishment...it really IS a huge deal that your son has done this!

KTC
06-29-2009, 10:40 PM
I knew I missed a thread. (-;

This is fantabulous news, Cass...you must be hugely pleased!

Cassiopeia
06-29-2009, 10:59 PM
*hugs* to you, Cassie, and a big, hearty CONGRATS! to your son. :) He sounds a lot like my brother (who, he might be interested to know, also has "only" a GED and is currently attending college himself), who is one of the smartest folks I know, but is also convinced he's not that bright. Nevermind the fact that he was in a program for the gifted...that's just his personality and always has been (he's going to be 30 this year).

Hopefully, your son *will* give college a try, because I believe it will do so much to boost his self-confidence. I'm sorry his father is being so dismissive of his accomplishment...it really IS a huge deal that your son has done this!You know...Cranky, I have a journal of his tucked away, (don't tell him, he thinks he threw it in the trash and I found it) from when he was nine years old. It was his "science inventions journal". It has a diagram of an invention he was working on at 9 to figure out how to take emissions from the exhaust and divert them to a chamber where he has some notes and things on how to convert them into back into combustible fuel only leaving a bit of water in the form of steam as the final output from the car.

Now this was back in 2000. He threw it away cos some people giggled and patted him on the head when he showed it to them. I did not, however; giggle. I told him, it was a great idea and to keep studying and who know but one day, he would find the answer to that problem. He told me, (imagine the face of an nine year old) "But Mom, if we don't fix this problem, we are going to have big trouble. We can't just leave it. I know I can figure it out and people won't have to pay much for it too."

He's my dreamer. The kid who would be driving along in the car with me and talk about the stars and the oceans and the moon...and then turn to me as I listened and say, "Mom, how come you never say much." And when I explained I liked listening to him, "But Mom, you can talk too, you are interesting, you know."

Right now, I would happily kick his dad really hard where it hurts him the most if I thought it would do any good. But it won't. I already know that. So *grins* I'm plotting a way to make my boy smile today. It's what I live for.


I knew I missed a thread. (-;

This is fantabulous news, Cass...you must be hugely pleased!Thanks, I am.

Old Hack
06-29-2009, 11:43 PM
Cass, I am so very pleased for you and your son. This is wonderful news, and both of you should be dancing around with joy. As should his father, but that would obviously be expecting too much. Never mind: these things make us stronger, and all that.

As it happens, your post is very welcome here.

My youngest was nine yesterday and we spent the morning at a go-kart racing track with him: his first time, and he was brilliant. He drove several laps in a faster time than his 13 year old brother and his 44 year old father, who were both being very competitive and trying to lap everyone.

I'm still thrilled by it all, because he's profoundly dyslexic and hasn't been able to shine at anything until yesterday on the race track, despite being one of the brightest children his teachers have ever dealt with--his dyslexia brings with it big problems with his short term memory, and as well as the literacy issues it causes him, it also stops him playing team sports and taking part in a lot of the school activities, as most levels of instruction defeat him (he can't cope with more than two or three instructions at one time, and ends up doing nothing).

So while I know nothing of your son's disabilities, your description of him--inventing things, having that wonderful imagination and that huge capacity for generous thought--remind me of Fred, and the person I know him to be. So when I read of how well your lovely boy is doing right now, I can imagine Fred in a few years, doing just as well and delighting me in the same way your boy delights you, and it makes me feel quite incredibly happy. Thank you for that. Really. It means more than I can say.

Cassiopeia
06-30-2009, 12:13 AM
Cass, I am so very pleased for you and your son. This is wonderful news, and both of you should be dancing around with joy. As should his father, but that would obviously be expecting too much. Never mind: these things make us stronger, and all that.

As it happens, your post is very welcome here.

My youngest was nine yesterday and we spent the morning at a go-kart racing track with him: his first time, and he was brilliant. He drove several laps in a faster time than his 13 year old brother and his 44 year old father, who were both being very competitive and trying to lap everyone.

I'm still thrilled by it all, because he's profoundly dyslexic and hasn't been able to shine at anything until yesterday on the race track, despite being one of the brightest children his teachers have ever dealt with--his dyslexia brings with it big problems with his short term memory, and as well as the literacy issues it causes him, it also stops him playing team sports and taking part in a lot of the school activities, as most levels of instruction defeat him (he can't cope with more than two or three instructions at one time, and ends up doing nothing).

So while I know nothing of your son's disabilities, your description of him--inventing things, having that wonderful imagination and that huge capacity for generous thought--remind me of Fred, and the person I know him to be. So when I read of how well your lovely boy is doing right now, I can imagine Fred in a few years, doing just as well and delighting me in the same way your boy delights you, and it makes me feel quite incredibly happy. Thank you for that. Really. It means more than I can say.:Hug2:

My amazing boy, I fondly call him Bubba G...long story...;) has sensory integration problems coupled with occupational issues and ADD. I think the ADD is a result of his brain not being able to filter out the ambient noises and lights and he's so overwhelmed at times he forgets why he walked 15 feet from the family room to the kitchen. We found while in South Africa, that his brain had never developed the skill as an infant to cross the mid-line. So while he mirrored and showed some signs of dyslexia, the therapy they gave him there, corrected it to a point. His biggest difficulty is in getting what is from his brain to his hand and to remember what he was going to write. There's a gap there for him. He has difficulty to this day with his fine motor skills but he's improving though in 2003 they said this was as good as it gets, he's learned to play the guitar and his handwriting is much improved. Here in the states, the specialists were so stunned by his scores when they tested him, they asked to redo it. At 12 he had the knowledge and analyitcal skills of a high school graduate. But that just put him out of reach for any help from the state other than an accomodation for letting him type his papers and have more time for tests...but let me tell you, not all the teachers worked with him. Because they said he was faking it. Some days he can do really well and it seems like he's not got any issues...then something happens, too much noise or bright lights, heat...not feeling well and BAM, we are in the emergency room with a full blown asthma attack because his body can't cope. THEN they feel bad.

I'm glad he's out of the high school system. I just hope he'll go to college now and leave the rest behind. A GED is good enough for college here, but he's out to prove to his Dad that he can do the "real diploma". I don't know how to tell him this, but he will never get what he's looking for.

I do my best not to take it personally that everything I do and say means less than a man who's barely been in his life.

Clair Dickson
06-30-2009, 03:01 AM
Cass-- that's FANTASTIC.

I know first hand just how difficult the material on the GED is. You can pass high school without ever knowing half the stuff on that test!

As for moving on... well, I did. I had no trouble getting into a community college (which also saved me money), AND I actually am really glad I took my intro classes at the little college where I had 15-25 students in the class rather than 200+. It was a great experience and not hindered at all by my lack of a high school diploma. I transferred to a large state college and got my diploma and teaching certificate a few years later. No one ever bats an eye at my holding a GED rather than a high school diploma.

Though, again, the GED is much harder than the average high school course requirements. It's not a cop-out by any means. It's something to be proud of. Well, I'm going to be proud of it. But I'm probably biased. =)

This is a great achievement.

Matera the Mad
06-30-2009, 04:43 AM
WAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v260/matera/fire01.gif

Cassiopeia
06-30-2009, 05:11 AM
Cass-- that's FANTASTIC.

I know first hand just how difficult the material on the GED is. You can pass high school without ever knowing half the stuff on that test!

As for moving on... well, I did. I had no trouble getting into a community college (which also saved me money), AND I actually am really glad I took my intro classes at the little college where I had 15-25 students in the class rather than 200+. It was a great experience and not hindered at all by my lack of a high school diploma. I transferred to a large state college and got my diploma and teaching certificate a few years later. No one ever bats an eye at my holding a GED rather than a high school diploma.

Though, again, the GED is much harder than the average high school course requirements. It's not a cop-out by any means. It's something to be proud of. Well, I'm going to be proud of it. But I'm probably biased. =)

This is a great achievement.I just read this to my son and he's grinning from ear to ear. Thanks Claire! *hugs from a very grateful mom*

Manix
06-30-2009, 05:28 AM
You know...Cranky, I have a journal of his tucked away, (don't tell him, he thinks he threw it in the trash and I found it) from when he was nine years old. It was his "science inventions journal". It has a diagram of an invention he was working on at 9 to figure out how to take emissions from the exhaust and divert them to a chamber where he has some notes and things on how to convert them into back into combustible fuel only leaving a bit of water in the form of steam as the final output from the car.

Now this was back in 2000. He threw it away cos some people giggled and patted him on the head when he showed it to them. I did not, however; giggle. I told him, it was a great idea and to keep studying and who know but one day, he would find the answer to that problem. He told me, (imagine the face of an nine year old) "But Mom, if we don't fix this problem, we are going to have big trouble. We can't just leave it. I know I can figure it out and people won't have to pay much for it too."

He's my dreamer. The kid who would be driving along in the car with me and talk about the stars and the oceans and the moon...and then turn to me as I listened and say, "Mom, how come you never say much." And when I explained I liked listening to him, "But Mom, you can talk too, you are interesting, you know."

Right now, I would happily kick his dad really hard where it hurts him the most if I thought it would do any good. But it won't. I already know that. So *grins* I'm plotting a way to make my boy smile today. It's what I live for.

Thanks, I am.
This is so amazing. Keep encouraging him. He will remember what your words are long after you forget that you said them. Trust me. My son didn't get his diploma either, but it's not because he's not smart. He was, if anything, too smart for his own good. He was just too busy thinking about the next step of the equation to take time practicing and rehashing the basics with the rest of the class. He always thought it was a waste of his time. If I could have afforded a private education for him I would have. He sounds a lot like your son, Cass--inventing things all the time. Your son is so lucky to have a mother like you. Congratulations to you both for never giving up.

Cassiopeia
06-30-2009, 05:48 AM
This is so amazing. Keep encouraging him. He will remember what your words are long after you forget that you said them. Trust me. My son didn't get his diploma either, but it's not because he's not smart. He was, if anything, too smart for his own good. He was just too busy thinking about the next step of the equation to take time practicing and rehashing the basics with the rest of the class. He always thought it was a waste of his time. If I could have afforded a private education for him I would have. He sounds a lot like your son, Cass--inventing things all the time. Your son is so lucky to have a mother like you. Congratulations to you both for never giving up.Thanks! :)

My son has just been trying to get his hands to cooperate with his brain to write the information down...in the way they want. Thank goodness for typing..It's much easier. But he is going to finish the traditional high school diploma he's decided...the GED takes care of a full year of requirements for him. He feels it's going to look better.

I'll be here, to watch over him day by day..like I always am. Like we parents have a habit of doing. ;)

bettielee
06-30-2009, 06:36 AM
Congratulations, Cassiopeia! Two words:

Awe. Some.

Cassiopeia
06-30-2009, 06:45 AM
Congratulations, Cassiopeia! Two words:

Awe. Some.LOL. thanks :)

Ambrosia
06-30-2009, 04:27 PM
I wish, for your son's sake, he would understand that the GED *is* a high school diploma. It just doesn't come with the silly hat and tassle.

I got my GED instead of enduring another agonizing year in public high school. Then, went on to a 4 year college. The difference between treatment in high school and treatment in college is night and day. However, your son will have to have help in college for his disability issues. Please make sure he goes through the appropriate channels at the college he decides to attend so he can get the help he needs in class.

You are doing a fantastic job as a mom, Cassi. :)