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Thomas_Anderson
06-26-2009, 10:04 AM
My bookshelf is getting a tad full. Is there a place where I can donate/sell my old books?

While we're on the subject, is there a place where I can take my old movies as well? Gamestop doesn't take them anymore.

ccv707
06-26-2009, 10:09 AM
Donate them to me!!!! I can NEVER have enough books.

Or donate them to your local thrift stores, sell them to a used book store, or, perhaps, donate them to a thrift store near ME so I can buy them!!!

Gatita
06-26-2009, 10:20 AM
I've donated them to my public library, which is in dire need due to city budget cuts. And that way I can always "visit" with them if I miss 'em! ;)

virtue_summer
06-26-2009, 12:41 PM
I donate to my local library as well.

aadams73
06-26-2009, 01:19 PM
What is this "donate/sell" of which you speak?

No, seriously, my non-keepers go to Goodwill.

Linda Adams
06-26-2009, 01:44 PM
A library sale or a charity sale. We always have a book/video/DVD sale for CFC, so I use it as an opportunity to get rid of books and raise money for charity.

Mumut
06-26-2009, 01:55 PM
Try Ebay?

Pepper
06-26-2009, 02:41 PM
Send the good ones to me. :D

You could donate both books and movies to your local library, or even the library of a local school (depending what you read/watch, of course!). I've done that before. I don't bother trying to find a place to sell them because my books are always so warn after I'm done with them (or, in the instance of my Otherland series, chunks of pages falling out at random) :D

brainstorm77
06-26-2009, 02:51 PM
Goodwill seems like a good idea to me.

Spinetinglers
06-26-2009, 02:52 PM
If you're going to try selling them on ebay, make sure that you know exactly how much the listing is going to cost you if they don't sell. If you're not careful you could end up with your books and a bill for attempting to sell them.

I would suggest if you want to sell them try either Alibris.com, Abebooks.com or A1 - they'll take part of your final fee but won't charge for the listing and they can stay on until they sell.

Fenika
06-26-2009, 03:05 PM
Send them to people in countries that restrict what is publicly available.
Or countries that are poor and in need.

We have a thread in SFF that started b/c of that first issue...

Ken
06-26-2009, 03:13 PM
... dump them in the recycling bin out back :-(
But from now on I'm going to follow the fine examples set here and donate them.

brainstorm77
06-26-2009, 03:18 PM
... dump them in the recycling bin out back :-(
But from now on I'm going to follow the fine examples set here and donate them.
:) Charity is always good!

Bubastes
06-26-2009, 04:30 PM
I donate mine to the local library or sell them at the used book store.

Mr Flibble
06-26-2009, 04:37 PM
I donate to charity or - I set them free!


Book crossing (http://www.bookcrossing.com/) is a way of sharing books. You register your book, write a little note in the front (like: I've registered this book at BookCrossing.com so I can track its journey through this world. Please go to www.BookCrossing.com/123-456789 to let me know you found it, then read it and/or pass it on for someone else to enjoy. Thank you!) and then leave it somewhere, say an airport departure lounge.

It's kinda fun seeing where your books get to :D

And lots of people have picked up a book that they wouldn't normally read and enjoyed it. Oh, I see there's a book been set free in my local Starbucks...

seun
06-26-2009, 04:45 PM
Donate to your library. Because if there's one thing I love doing at work is going through peoples' tatty, falling apart and smelly books. ;)

Charity is the way forward. Despite budgets being cuts, your library can afford books. Charity shops and the terminally short of cash can't.

stormie
06-26-2009, 04:51 PM
Libraries. Call first. Sometimes they have a specific time or place to drop the books and videos off.

Or leave them outside a household recycling bin on a nice day (you'd hate to see them ruined if it rains before someone picks them up).

Gatita
06-26-2009, 05:27 PM
Despite budgets being cuts, your library can afford books.

:D Uhhh, not in my fair town.... we're the now-famous case of the public library (named after hometown hero John Steinbeck) closing b/c of city budgets... Salinas, California.

They've barely re-opened and are sooo appreciative of book donations.

---
PS. But then again, my books don't smell... ;)

megan_d
06-26-2009, 05:37 PM
The thought of parting with even just one of my books makes me get all nervous. What if I want to read it again some day?

seun
06-26-2009, 05:45 PM
---
PS. But then again, my books don't smell... ;)

You should see (or smell) some of the donations we get.

JamieB
06-26-2009, 05:48 PM
I donate to charity or - I set them free!


Book crossing (http://www.bookcrossing.com/) is a way of sharing books. You register your book, write a little note in the front (like: I've registered this book at BookCrossing.com so I can track its journey through this world. Please go to www.BookCrossing.com/123-456789 (http://www.BookCrossing.com/123-456789) to let me know you found it, then read it and/or pass it on for someone else to enjoy. Thank you!) and then leave it somewhere, say an airport departure lounge.

It's kinda fun seeing where your books get to :D

And lots of people have picked up a book that they wouldn't normally read and enjoyed it. Oh, I see there's a book been set free in my local Starbucks...

I love Book Crossing - such a cool idea. It hasn't caught on in my area, but I'm just about ready to part with some of mine.

DeleyanLee
06-26-2009, 06:01 PM
Several of our local libraries have boxes out in the lobby/foyers for books free to a good home. Sometimes it's amazing what you can find in there.

Gatita
06-26-2009, 06:40 PM
You should see (or smell) some of the donations we get.

:D em, er, thanks anyway... you hafta wonder though...

NeuroFizz
06-26-2009, 07:08 PM
Skeet shooting.



Pull.......

Carlene
06-26-2009, 07:35 PM
I'm wondering if there might be an organization that collects used books and sends them to our troops serving overseas? Maybe a local USO would know? Just a thought. I HATE to destroy or throw away books!

Carlene

Fenika
06-26-2009, 08:59 PM
The thought of parting with even just one of my books makes me get all nervous. What if I want to read it again some day?

Then wander down to your local library...

;)

Shadow_Ferret
06-26-2009, 09:04 PM
I sell them to a used book store. Might as well get something for them.

Soccer Mom
06-26-2009, 10:52 PM
Those who want to pass on their joy for reading might want to consider the Camel Book Drive (http://camelbookdrive.wordpress.com/), a mobile book library bringing reading material to readers in Africa.

scarletpeaches
06-26-2009, 10:54 PM
Give away...books...?

People do that?

ccv707
06-27-2009, 01:02 AM
But I want them.......you're mean.

Geez, I could never think of getting rid of my books.

blueobsidian
06-27-2009, 02:10 AM
I typically take mine to Half Price Books (http://www.halfpricebooks.com/), if you have one in your area. I probably make less than I would if I sold them individually, but it's really simple. You drop everything on the counter and they have an offer ready for you in 10 to 20 minutes. They also buy video games, CDs, DVDs, VHS, etc. Anything they can't sell gets donated to a non-profit (my local store donates to a lot of schools).

AngelRoseDarke
06-27-2009, 02:16 AM
I donate some to charity and take the others to the local used book store. They don't pay cash, but I get store credit to get more books. I don't do this often though. I keep most of mine to read again later.

dancingandflying
06-27-2009, 02:59 AM
Donate them to the library, register them for Book Crossing, or put them up at Paperback Swap (http://www.paperbackswap.com/index.php).

d&f.

Cassiopeia
06-27-2009, 03:01 AM
Shelves, crowded full of books is a good thing. Make another bookcase and keep on collecting. :) Then one day you can ask people if they'd like to step into your library. :)

scarletpeaches
06-27-2009, 03:04 AM
Shelves, crowded full of books is a good thing. Make another bookcase and keep on collecting. :) Then one day you can ask people if they'd like to step into your library. :)

...and laugh at people who say, "I read a lot too! I've got at least 100 books!"

James D. Macdonald
06-27-2009, 03:22 AM
Hospitals, or soldiers, both need books.

blueobsidian
06-27-2009, 03:40 AM
Shelves, crowded full of books is a good thing.

Until you have to move them. I have already packed a dozen large boxes of books with more yet to go, and am at the point where I'm ready to sell everything and just wear out my library card.

Namatu
06-27-2009, 03:50 AM
Until you have to move them. I have already packed a dozen large boxes of books with more yet to go, and am at the point where I'm ready to sell everything and just wear out my library card.Very true. Moving the books is daunting.

I'm trying to keep my books restricted to three bookcases, but am overflowing. I've got some set aside to donate to the library (the Camel Book Drive sounds really cool, I'll have to look into it), but I still need another bookcase because I can't part with more right now. I donate most that I've already read, but half of my current stock are books I still need to get to.

mscelina
06-27-2009, 04:04 AM
Just do what I do.

get more shelves.

*shrug*

See how easy that was? Problem solved. Although, if more people like you would donate their hardcover first editions to you local used bookstore or thrift shop then collectors and rare book dealers like me would have more stock. *evil grin*

I could always send you my address...

Khazarkhum
06-27-2009, 04:19 AM
Very true. Moving the books is daunting.

I'm trying to keep my books restricted to three bookcases, but am overflowing. I've got some set aside to donate to the library (the Camel Book Drive sounds really cool, I'll have to look into it), but I still need another bookcase because I can't part with more right now. I donate most that I've already read, but half of my current stock are books I still need to get to.

Last time we moved the estimator stood and stared at all the books for a loooong time. You knew he was thinking..."books...why'd it have to be books?"

See if your local jail/prison library will take them. Their books get read to death, the only proper way a book should die.

benbradley
06-27-2009, 04:30 AM
If you're going to try selling them on ebay, make sure that you know exactly how much the listing is going to cost you if they don't sell. If you're not careful you could end up with your books and a bill for attempting to sell them.

I would suggest if you want to sell them try either Alibris.com, Abebooks.com or A1 - they'll take part of your final fee but won't charge for the listing and they can stay on until they sell.
I agree about eBay, that place has so many different fees (it did three or four years ago, I haven't listed anything in a while, and I don't want to look now - the fees ALWAYS went up, though occasionally they had "free listing days" and other such crap), it can be hard just to calculate what eBay's take would be at a certain sale price. But if it does NOT sell, that's easy, you only pay the listing fee. Ebay's "Seller Central" message board is chock full of drama over this and every other issue. I wonder if their Michael Jackson thread is longer than AW's.

Amazon.com works much like your description of Alibris and abebooks (I haven't used those, but ISTR their fees are less than Amazon, but they also have less visibility) listing books is free, then if/when they sell Amazon puts the money (minus Amazon's fixed percentage take, plus some portion of the shipping charge) in your checking account (I suggest opening a second checking account just for online dealings with these entities). Ship the book within two days of it being ordered, and you're in business as An Online Bookseller.

But check prices of each book before you list, only very recent or some unusual out-of-print used books sell for enough to make a book worth listing. For books I couldn't sell for $5, I'd list them on paperbackswap.

... dump them in the recycling bin out back :-(
But from now on I'm going to follow the fine examples set here and donate them.
Thrift stores and libraries sometimes toss out donated books because they can't sell them for 25 cents or they didn't sell for a similar price at the library sale (though our local library tends to donate books that didn't sell to the thrift store).

The thought of parting with even just one of my books makes me get all nervous. What if I want to read it again some day?
Do you have to read that exact same copy? I could see that if you've written notes in the margin, or the author inscribed it just to you, but otherwise you can get another from the local bookstore, Amazon or paperbackswap.

Until you have to move them. I have already packed a dozen large boxes of books with more yet to go, and am at the point where I'm ready to sell everything and just wear out my library card.
I make my own freestanding bookshelves. Many years ago I made them six feet tall and three feet wide, but moving was a pain, boxing them up and all. Now I make them about 16 inches wide, small and light enough to hold together when pushed onto a side or corner and easily 'walked." It uses more vertical side panels per set of books, but I can "walk" a full shelf (maybe 150-200 lbs) a couple of feet easily, and if I need to move it further I can use a hand truck and slide the whole shelf into the back of a pickup truck or whatever. I have maybe 20 of these full and still more books, and have moved the fully loaded shelves from the house to the office/warehouse by myself.

I haven't sold a book in years, but maybe I should at near giveaway prices just to help get rid of a few, if they would sell at all.

One thing I do at the thrift store is look for the MMPB's that are desirable on paperbackswap, specifically anything by Janet Evanovich, that way I can keep up enough credits to get the things on my wish list.

Namatu
06-27-2009, 04:48 AM
Last time we moved the estimator stood and stared at all the books for a loooong time. You knew he was thinking..."books...why'd it have to be books?"You let your mover take your books?! Heh heh. Last time I moved, it was just a mile away, and I was kind of fleeing. I took all the books with me in my car. It only required a few trips!

Kaylee
06-27-2009, 06:25 AM
I donated my to the local library.

extortionist
06-27-2009, 07:41 AM
Do you have to read that exact same copy? I could see that if you've written notes in the margin, or the author inscribed it just to you, but otherwise you can get another from the local bookstore, Amazon or paperbackswap.
The ability to replace books you've sold doesn't help at all when you're in the middle of writing something and remember out of nowhere that this one author in this one particular book at this certain part dealt with almost the exact same thing you're stuck on and boy wouldn't it be nice if you could see how he got past it but--oh no, where'd that book go?

Or you have people over and you're talking about beat literature and there's this really cute girl who just loves it and you'd show her your massive collection of Kerouac and Ginsberg and Burroughs and even some Cassady and Corso, but, no, you sold them all!

No, no, no, selling books is wrong! Books are to be hoarded eternally, passed on to friends or family only when absolutely necessary!


Or more seriously, I'd probably sell books to a local used book store if I wanted to get rid of them (I don't, ever). You can often trade them for store credit so you can get other books you haven't read.

Though if you're not so poor you have to scrounge for change for books like I do then donating to libraries or goodwill is definitely a good way to go.

seun
06-27-2009, 05:41 PM
I can't speak for what it's like outside the UK, but here, I'd say libraries are the last place you should donate books to. Book budgets have been cut in a lot of cities, but councils can still afford to buy new books. Charity shops can't.

ccv707
06-27-2009, 06:15 PM
...give...them...to....ME!

No one wants to give me books...I want them all!

Wayne K
06-27-2009, 06:44 PM
I throw them at old people or bad drivers or both.

William Haskins
06-27-2009, 06:46 PM
See if your local jail/prison library will take them.

i echo this.

seun
06-27-2009, 07:06 PM
See if your local jail/prison library will take them. Their books get read to death, the only proper way a book should die.

Again using my place as an example, our local prison has a budget for books. Obviously it's not the same amount as a 'normal' library, but they do have money to spend. Going by what happens to the books they buy (pages torn out to make roll ups, anything sex related torn out or books just simply stolen), the prisoners aren't the same as the ones in Shawshank.

CaoPaux
06-27-2009, 07:23 PM
There's also nursing homes, senior centers, retirement homes, etc.

Spinetinglers
06-27-2009, 07:29 PM
In the UK we have what is called assisted living communities (folds) these are for people with disabilities or for pensioners who whilst they can still live on their own may need the security of being able to call on help at any time should they fall etc. These communities don't have any budget for books and would be extremely grateful.

In addition if any of you have any children's books that your children have outgrown please consider giving them to either the Accident and Emergency department (ER) of your local hospital or the children's wards - again they don't have a specific budget but they're always in need of small toys and books.

MaryMumsy
06-27-2009, 07:30 PM
No, no, no, selling books is wrong! Books are to be hoarded eternally, passed on to friends or family only when absolutely necessary!

You can have my books when you pry them from my cold dead fingers. :tongue
And since my hubby won't let me get any more bookcases (he claims we have no place to put them), he just has to live with the stacks I have all over the house.

MM

Spinetinglers
06-27-2009, 07:34 PM
I had the same problem with bookcases but now have masses of shelving put up in the roofspace - if your roofspace is floored and dry - it's perfect and amazing how many books you can find a home for.

ResearchGuy
06-27-2009, 07:38 PM
A few years ago, I gave thousands of old books to the local SPCA for its wildly popular book sales. Time to do it again. Also, local libraries often have book sales run by "friends of the library" groups. Salvation Army and Goodwill take books and sell them in their stores. Keep careful records and the donations are tax-deductible (but you have to have a reasonable basis for the amount claimed and must include a figure for what you paid for them).

I have also traded some in at a used book store, for store credit, but that is not entirely helpful, as I have to buy more books to cash in the credit, and then only on a limited basis.

--Ken

BigWords
06-27-2009, 08:39 PM
Every time I go through my collection (every single time) I find doubles, multiples and various editions of the same book. With anything I have bought more than once, I send them off to the local charity shop - a little independant pet charity.

The last clean-out yielded twelve copies of the Twilight Zone film novelization!

LLauren
06-27-2009, 10:58 PM
Hi,

Local schools can often use them and libraries will put them up for sale, but you should probably ask first. Some don't want them and just end up throwing them out.

On my website, I have a page (http://www.bibliobuffet.com/content/view/16/38/) that provides names, links, and descriptions of worthy places to donate. Victoria Strauss recommended "Reader to Reader" to me when I was checking out the organizations, and I gave it my highest recommendation. But you can find a lot here and they are all good.

benbradley
06-28-2009, 01:40 AM
Also, the American Association of University Women has had huge yearly book sales for many years, just as Goodwill used to have, in the middle of malls. I barely see a mention of it on their website, and the last one I was at was about two years ago, but I've seen a donation barrel at Harry's (now Whole Foods) in Alpharetta, GA. I would have thought the website would have more on these book sales and how to donate books.

Kryianna
06-29-2009, 01:30 AM
Places like the Ronald McDonald House are generally starving for books. Even if there's not one in your area, check with the local hospital -- there's usually a small non-profit house for loved ones to stay in.

AngelicaRJackson
06-29-2009, 01:41 AM
Prisons are definitely appreciative of books---the bookstore I used to work at donated our strips to the local prison. That's actually against the law since we were supposed to destroy them, but we all loved books and couldn't bear to think of them being pulped. Of course, that meant that when we overbought in certain genres, the inmates got a lot of Danielle Steele and pirate romances!

Homeless shelters take them, too, sometimes. The big homeless outreach group in Sac called Loaves & Fishes has a school for homeless kids, The Mustard Seed School, and if they are age-appropriate they love to get books.

stormie
06-29-2009, 03:51 AM
I had the same problem with bookcases but now have masses of shelving put up in the roofspace - if your roofspace is floored and dry - it's perfect and amazing how many books you can find a home for.
We tried that, putting books up in a dry, ventilated attic. But we used cardboard boxes and unfortunately forgot about them. A few years later, we either had bookworms or termites that ate at the pages. Little holes everywhere.

Another time we just laid the books on the floor of a very dry second floor closet. Same thing. We threw out hundreds of wonderful books.

Maybe putting the books in plastic bins first would have helped a lot.

Now I have bookcases in the living room, family room, upstairs hallway, bedrooms.... Places where I can see them and dust them every week.