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View Full Version : Hope I'm in thr thread...Nee info



stephen57
06-21-2009, 09:04 PM
hello.

I have a question, if this isn't the right forum, please direct me.

My wife of 20 years wrote five mansucripts. Romance, of course. She found a publisher at one point but everything stopped when she became ill with a heart/lung problem. A few months ago, she gave them to me and told me if I want to try and publish them if I can. An editor friend of hers ahd them corrected and tweaked, Now we got the news that she's losing her eyesight due to complications of diabetes.

What I'd like to know is, could I have them published? If I do, would it be under her pen name or mine? At this point, I'll even try a POD just so she can see her work in print before her sight completely goes. Although, I would like to try regular publishers first. Can someone direct me. tx

Cyia
06-21-2009, 09:25 PM
You said she had a publisher, but everything "stopped". Does the original publisher have them under contract? If so, then you've got a problem.

If not, then you should be able to publish them under her name - however, there's still the matter of finding a publisher. That generally means finding an agent first because most publishers won't accept submissions straight from the author.

If they're not a series, maybe you could use Lulu to get one in print now while locating an agent for the others?

citymouse
06-21-2009, 09:29 PM
Steven, I'm sorry to hear about your wife. You're facing a tough time. I'll include you and your wife in my prayers.

Her request isn't unreasonable, however, you need an attorney who specializes in entertainment/publishing law to answer your publishing questions. I know it's an emotional time for you and emotions are a poor guide to what essentially is a business issue. So a lawyer can guide you best.

POD? Hmm, I'd look at that option very carefully before signing on with POD. Traditionally novels are a hard sell via the POD route. If however, you simply want to have your wife's book(s) printed and logged into the Library of Congress as a lasting token of her writing that certainly can be done.
Gd bless you both,
C


hello.

I have a question, if this isn't the right forum, please direct me.

My wife of 20 years wrote five mansucripts. Romance, of course. She found a publisher at one point but everything stopped when she became ill with a heart/lung problem. A few months ago, she gave them to me and told me if I want to try and publish them if I can. An editor friend of hers ahd them corrected and tweaked, Now we got the news that she's losing her eyesight due to complications of diabetes.

What I'd like to know is, could I have them published? If I do, would it be under her pen name or mine? At this point, I'll even try a POD just so she can see her work in print before her sight completely goes. Although, I would like to try regular publishers first. Can someone direct me. tx

happywritermom
06-21-2009, 09:54 PM
She is still perfectly competent, right?
If so, then you can write the query letters for her and do all that stuff on her behalf. She can still sign any necessary paperwork. There is no need for a lawyer in that case, though it might be a good idea to add a clause to any contracts that says that you have accurately read the information to her in such a way that she could understand and then have you sign as well.
I would first, approach the initial publisher and find out what the status of that is. Then, if that publisher is no longer interested (or never had a contract with her, you could try either securing an agent or going through a small press. The Wild Rose Press might be a good place to start.
As long as she still has her wits about her, she shouldn't have to stop writing simply because she's losing her eyesight. There is plenty of voice recognition software out there and she can always hire someone to proofread.

Phaeal
06-22-2009, 06:17 PM
I see no reason why they wouldn't be published under her name or pen name. That's kind of the point, I imagine.

Once you're sure the original interested publisher has no legal hold on the books, proceed as with any other project. Query agents for those markets that won't look at unagented material. Query editors who will look at material direct from the author.

To do this effectively, you'll need a good query package, one for each of the novels. The package will include a query letter, a synopsis or two (one short, at 1-2 pages single-spaced; one longer, at around 5 pages double-spaced), and 50 pages of perfected manuscript for sample chapters/pages. Agents and editors all want specific bits of the package. Some might only want the query letter. Some might want the letter, a short synopsis and 10 pages of manuscript. You need to check each agent and editor's preferences. Most will be available on their websites.

To learn about writing query letters and synopses, see the Share Your Work forum on this site for guidelines. The guidelines will also link you to other helpful sites.

Good luck!