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NeuroFizz
06-21-2009, 07:35 AM
Fizzette is 6 years old--she just finished Kindergarten last week. Tonight when we put her to bed, we found this note on the nightstand next to her bed (some words were not spelled correctly, so this is a paraphrase).

Signed [her first name]

Sign below on the line to prove that you really are the tooth fairy. And move the puff.

__________________________


The line was provided for the signature, and the puff was for a foam make-up applicator which she had put next to the note, with another small note with the word "puff" and several thick arrows pointing to it.

She has already lost her front teeth and the new ones are growing in. She has one loose tooth on the bottom, but its loss isn't going to happen soon. I don't think Little Fizzy (9 yrs old) put her up to it or precipitated it because of his reaction. The note is priceless (to us) and will eventually go into her memory book.

I know people here have different attitudes about the issue of letting children believe in Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, and the Easter Bunny (I remember a long and interresting thread on it a couple of years ago), and I'm not interested in defending or discussing the decision Mrs. Fizzy and I made about it. But I am interested in finding out how those who have or would make the decision to support these child-myths would handle the situation. I'll not let on yet what we are doing, although the two of us are in agreement on it.

spamwarrior
06-21-2009, 07:41 AM
So cute!!!

I don't think kids are harmed from it, either way. After a while they just accept that perhaps mom and dad just act as the tooth fairy.

Haggis
06-21-2009, 07:43 AM
They grow up so fast, Fizzy. Let her enjoy the fantasy for now. I'd opt for writing something on the note like

"Dear Fizzette,

Thank you for the tooth. I hope you enjoy the dollar (or whatever you give) in return.

I would have moved the puff, but it was too heavy.

Love,

TF"

But that's just me.

Cassiopeia
06-21-2009, 07:44 AM
I'd put the puff next to where she'll find it first thing in the morning with a note that reads:

I'll be back when that tooth falls out. :)

Sean D. Schaffer
06-21-2009, 08:32 AM
I'm 37, and my parents still talk to me at Christmas about what Santa put under the tree. I know full well they're the ones putting the presents under there, because when I go to their house for that holiday I actually sleep in the living room right next to the tree! :)

And I never get tired of that fantasy. It brings such a precious sense of what my good childhood memories meant to me that I cannot imagine my life without some belief that Santa Claus might very well exist.... even if it is only in my own mind.

I would definitely let her have her belief right now. Childhood is such a fleeting time in our lives, that taking that away from her so early would, IMHO, be a travesty.


Blessed Be. :)

James81
06-21-2009, 08:39 AM
I'd write her a note back:

"Oh well. Looks like the jig is up. Thanks for saving me a whole assload of money.

Love,

Dad"

James81
06-21-2009, 08:40 AM
Oh, and I would definately use that word "assload" too. :D

bettielee
06-21-2009, 08:41 AM
They grow up so fast, Fizzy. Let her enjoy the fantasy for now. I'd opt for writing something on the note like

"Dear Fizzette,

Thank you for the tooth. I hope you enjoy the dollar (or whatever you give) in return.

I would have moved the puff, but it was too heavy.

Love,

TF"

But that's just me.

I'm with hoody.

Cassiopeia
06-21-2009, 08:44 AM
I'm with hoody.At first when I read this, I thought, is that like being "with child"? Then I realized what you meant...so, pretty much the same thing, we all know what a child, haggis is. ;)

Button
06-21-2009, 11:22 AM
What are you all talking about doing something? Just let the tooth fairy sign it. *denialbeliever*

I'd play the game for as long as I could get away with it.

MacAllister
06-21-2009, 11:26 AM
God, James. Remind me why I haven't just put you on global ignore and been done with it?

aadams73
06-21-2009, 11:35 AM
I'm for letting her believe, too. Let her be a kid as long as she can be. Adulthood comes too fast.

JoNightshade
06-22-2009, 08:19 AM
Uh, hold on here. I'm all for letting kids believe in stuff. But do I have this correct? She expects the tooth fairy to show up WITHOUT A TOOTH TO COLLECT?

My tactic on this would be to casually mention to little Fizzy that toying with and/or testing magical beings is asking for trouble. Fairies are notoriously fickle, and if she tricks the tooth fairy into showing up and there's no tooth... TF might decide to take something else instead.

If little Fizzy insists on leaving the note, I'd toss the puff across the room, steal one of her (little) toys, and leave a ransom note saying the toy would be returned when she produced a tooth.

Susie
06-22-2009, 08:31 AM
That's is so cute and know you both will make the right decision. But really, there's no tooth fairy, Santa or Easter Bunny? *Runs away for a chocolate bar. :)*

Dichroic
06-22-2009, 01:08 PM
I'd leave the puff unmoved and the note unsigned. Why *would* the tooth fairy visit, if no tooth is lost? I didn't believe in such things, but if I had I was also a logical kid: I've have taken signing to be proof it was Mom or Dad, because who else would see the note?

(Of course, if she's just getting things ready for when the tooth *does* fall out, then you can congratulate her on her foresight and steer her toward a career in disaster-relief planning. Be good for everybody to have more people in that field who are good at thinking ahead.)

regdog
06-22-2009, 01:56 PM
They grow up so fast, Fizzy. Let her enjoy the fantasy for now. I'd opt for writing something on the note like

"Dear Fizzette,

Thank you for the tooth. I hope you enjoy the dollar (or whatever you give) in return.

I would have moved the puff, but it was too heavy.

Love,

TF"

But that's just me.


Great answer


I think it's great for kids to stay kids and keep their childhood fantasies as long as possible.

When I worked at a dental office a young boy from another country had his tooth out and I called his father and told him about the tooth fairy and asked if it would be something he would be interested in doing. He was very excited to adopt the tradition. So I gave the son the tooth in a little box and told him to put it under his pillow and he would get a surprise. I wasn't sure who was more excited by the idea, the boy or his dad.

Ken
06-22-2009, 02:26 PM
... someone posted a story in the horror SYW forum several months back about a demonic tooth fairy that terrorized a community. Great read, though not quite the sort of tale to be read to a young'un.

calley
06-22-2009, 03:37 PM
I'm all about continuing the myths as long as possible. If you haven't already... sign the note! With your non-dominant hand. No need to make it easy for her to match signatures. ;)

NeuroFizz
06-22-2009, 04:29 PM
Thank you all for commenting. Our response was along the lines of Jo and Dichroic. We told Fizzette there was no tooth to collect so the tooth fairy wouldn't come--the note probably wouldn't be signed and the puff wouldn't be moved. Although she's a little young for such a discussion, we all have to reserve some faith (non-religious faith--maybe trust is a better word) in one another, to trust we are what we say we are until proven otherwise, or unless there is initial reason to suspect otherwise. Kind of hard to argue this when we're talking about a mythical being, though, so the real discussion on this will come up later in her life under different circumstances. But when we call a plumber, we don't expect to see a list of his/her qualitifcations, although we can ask about qualitifications or for references. We usually just assume he/she is competent and fair (unless found to be otherwise).

We left the note unsigned and the puff unmoved, and left her to reason it out if she didn't accept the tooth-only appearance idea. As with kids her age, she just moved onto something else in her day without comment. If we think writing is one of the most subjective activities around, parenting can't be far from it.

maestrowork
06-22-2009, 08:23 PM
What? The tooth fairy isn't real?

WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!

Button
06-22-2009, 08:34 PM
Kind of like when you try to trick Santa Claus by coming down the stairs and trying to take a peek at him. Or set a bear trap to keep him there. Or poison the cookies so he'd have to stay at your house. 'Cause you know that never works.

It is kind of presumptuous of kids. It's a good trust/faith lesson. Not that you need my approval, but well played.