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Project nachonaco
06-19-2005, 08:57 AM
Is it true that submissions for novels to be published are now being accepted through email?

aruna
06-19-2005, 10:42 AM
Is it true that submissions for novels to be published are now being accepted through email?

I wouldn't do that in the first instance unless an agent/editor specifically asks for it. Many don't like it and will immediately delete.
Once you have your own agent/editor however it's common practice.

Cathy C
06-19-2005, 07:25 PM
It depends on the publisher but in some cases, sure. But as aruna said, make sure you check their guidelines to see if the one you're interested in allows it. But I transmit ALL of my manuscripts by e-mail (that's not the same as SUBMIT, mind you -- I'm already under contract. But it is the format my editor and agent prefer.)

Liam Jackson
06-19-2005, 07:50 PM
Follow the submission guidelines to the letter. You can't wrong, there. Any deviation from the stated process carries significant risk of p*ssing off the editor and that's seldom a good thing. ;)

maestrowork
06-19-2005, 07:55 PM
Yes, more and more agents and publishers use email for submission/rejection purposes. But read their guidelines. Don't assume they accept submission electronically because they provide email as contact.

Susan Gable
06-20-2005, 12:04 AM
It depends on the publisher but in some cases, sure. But as aruna said, make sure you check their guidelines to see if the one you're interested in allows it. But I transmit ALL of my manuscripts by e-mail (that's not the same as SUBMIT, mind you -- I'm already under contract. But it is the format my editor and agent prefer.)

Dang, Cathy, I wish my publisher would do that. Especially since the office I work with is in Toronto. It would make life soooo much easier. Instant delivery, what could be better? (Unless you own stock in Fed Ex, then I suppose you wouldn't think it's so great. <G>)

Susan G., who would love to send her complete mss via email.

Cathy C
06-20-2005, 12:34 AM
Dang, Cathy, I wish my publisher would do that. Especially since the office I work with is in Toronto. It would make life soooo much easier. Instant delivery, what could be better? (Unless you own stock in Fed Ex, then I suppose you wouldn't think it's so great. <G>)

Susan G., who would love to send her complete mss via email.

Gotta tell 'ya -- I love, love, LOVE doing everything by e-mail. We're in the middle of nowhere in central Texas where the streets roll up at 4:00 p.m. (not kidding here, folks! Post office, banks, courthouse --- EVERYTHING closes at 4:00. It was the hardest thing to deal with after living in a major metro area.) We've also learned that overnight delivery . . . isn't. It takes one day to get out of Texas, and another day to get anywhere else! It's a PITA for sending galleys back. Sigh! I try hard not to crowd that particular deadline, because I'm terrified that one of these days I'm going to be one day late and get bumped to the next release month! :eek:

Susan Gable
06-20-2005, 01:24 AM
It's a PITA for sending galleys back. Sigh! I try hard not to crowd that particular deadline, because I'm terrified that one of these days I'm going to be one day late and get bumped to the next release month! :eek:

Ahhhh, now see, I don't send back the galleys. In that case, I email my editor a list of page & line numbers and the changes that need to be made.

Again, anything to avoid that "not getting it in on time" that can lead to bad ripple effects. <G>

I'm also fortunate that I'm so close to Toronto, in a pinch, I can drive the ms to the office myself and not have to worry about overnight delivery. I've never pushed it that far, though. <G>

Susan G.

Project nachonaco
06-20-2005, 01:45 AM
Another question: Should I bind my work or anything like that? Also, where can I find a list of good publishers? Area doesn't really matter to me.

Cathy C
06-20-2005, 02:23 AM
Do you mean bind for submission to a publisher? Well, that depends on the size. If you're talking about the first three chapters of a novel, then you want the pages loose (as in not stapled at the corner) and bound with a binder clip (see one here : http://www.officedepot.com/ddSKU.do?level=SK&id=308957&uniqueSearchFlag=true&Ntt=binder+clips&An=text ) But the largest one will only hold about 100 pages.

For a full book manuscript, what most publishers prefer to see is a single strong rubber band around the loose pages (strong enough that it won't break and snap them in the face when it's removed from the pages.)

As for good publishers -- for what genre? Area SHOULD matter to you, whether you meant the geographic area, or the area (genre) of the publisher or even the area (type) of publisher.

Project nachonaco
06-20-2005, 02:35 AM
I meant locaiton. I can send pretty much anywhere I wanna.

The book may be way too thick. My aunt has a binder-making machine (the thing that makes the comb and stuff), and I could use that....would that be all right or does it depend on the publisher?

Project nachonaco
06-21-2005, 11:33 PM
So what exactly is the hierarchy for getting my novel published

Editor
Agent
Publisher


or


Agent
Editor
Publisher?

Cathy C
06-22-2005, 12:04 AM
Let's go through that again, nacho. DON'T bind it! The agent or editor will want the pages loose, but held together with a rubber band. Rubber bands come in a variety of sizes. Some are big enough to wrap around a whole filing cabinet, so don't worry that the book will be too big for one. (And if it's too big for a rubber band, it will DEFINITELY be too big for a comb binder. You'd be hard pressed to find a comb larger than 4", and that probably won't hold a double spaced manuscript of a large book.


There should only be two in your heirarchy.

Agent
Publisher

The editor works FOR the publisher. Whether you should send it to one versus the other is the longest standing question in writer-dom. An agent might be able to get you a better deal with a publisher, should know and have worked with publishers (so has a foot in the door) and can help you understand any contract you might sign.

A publisher is often happy to work with you individually (depending on the house. Some only accept agented submissions, which might turn into an issue depending on your genre.) The editor is who you submit to AT the publisher.

Does that make sense?

Project nachonaco
06-22-2005, 12:09 AM
Yeah, just one last question:

Do I absolutely have to double space? Just curious.

Cathy C
06-22-2005, 12:37 AM
Yep. You absolutely have to unless the publisher's guidelines say differently. Just plan that paper will be one of the primary expenses of your career. Toner/Ink is another.

Project nachonaco
06-22-2005, 12:46 AM
Yet another question...I've never done this before and I don't want to screw up...

If they want a book signing, they (the bookstore reps) come to me, right, or the other way around, or does it work both ways?