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Cyia
06-04-2009, 02:05 AM
If a new police officer - say in their first week on the job - were to kill someone in the line of duty (A clean kill with witnesses to say the officer was doing their job and protecting someone else, not some shady middle of the night shooting). Is it like they show on TV where there's an inquiry and the officer has to turn over their gun/badge for a while, or would they still be an active officer on their patrol?

The scenario is that someone is being threatened with a knife. The officer draws her weapon and tells the man to put the knife down. He doesn't, so she repeats herself. The man with the knife charges both his intended victim and the officer in question, so the officer fires. The shot kills the guy with the knife.

Would she still be able to go out on patrol the next day? Or would she be at a desk or on leave?

pixydust
06-04-2009, 02:08 AM
Unfortunately, it really depends on the city and the department. In some places they wouldn't have many officers on the streets if they did that. :D Can you say: LA?

Let me ask my husband (he's a cop), and I'll get back to you with exact procedure.

lemonhead
06-04-2009, 06:22 AM
depends on how badly your department likes to screw with you, who/what connections the assailant had, the amount of media that is involved, the race you killed and the race you are (sad but true), the amount of public that was around at the time.

A department can screw with you big time or they can be fine

lemonhead
06-04-2009, 06:22 AM
if you are a new officer you are in your probationary period so any killing you do is probably going to be automatic investigation.

Cyia
06-05-2009, 06:31 AM
Thanks :)

Gatita
06-05-2009, 01:32 PM
In the department I cover, ALL fatal officer-involved shootings are investigated by the department and then the DA's office... the officer is put on desk duty until it's all concluded.

RJK
06-05-2009, 09:41 PM
It doesn't matter if the officer has 3 days or 30 years. If he uses deadly force there will be an internal affairs investigation. Usually, the officer is taken off the street and assigned to 'Other' duties. Sometimes he is suspended with pay. It depends on department policy, not politics. If the officer kills someone, the shooting is investigated by the DA and, in NY, the case will go before the Grand Jury. If the grand jury decides the officer was acting within the law, a 'No Bill' decision will be made. This does not mean that the officer will be cleared of departmental charges, if he failed to follow procedures.
If the Grand Jury finds that the officer did not have the right to shoot, the officer will be arrested and charged with the homicide. He will stand trial just like any other person charged with a crime.

Rowan
06-11-2009, 03:21 AM
If a new police officer - say in their first week on the job - were to kill someone in the line of duty (A clean kill with witnesses to say the officer was doing their job and protecting someone else, not some shady middle of the night shooting). Is it like they show on TV where there's an inquiry and the officer has to turn over their gun/badge for a while, or would they still be an active officer on their patrol?

The scenario is that someone is being threatened with a knife. The officer draws her weapon and tells the man to put the knife down. He doesn't, so she repeats herself. The man with the knife charges both his intended victim and the officer in question, so the officer fires. The shot kills the guy with the knife.

Would she still be able to go out on patrol the next day? Or would she be at a desk or on leave?

From what I know.... Most departments would put the individual on administrative leave pending an inquiry by Internal Affairs (or equivalent if Fed), etc. It doesn't matter how long you've been on the job - it's just standard procedure. Even if it was a good shooting (and obvious).