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EzraHoliday
05-10-2009, 01:22 AM
Last night Marc Zicree was on Coast to Coast and someone asked him about how to pitch fiction. Marc went through the usual things, querying and conventions and all that.

But then he said something that made me pause and really think.

He said that when he pitched a book, he'd follow up on the query a week later with a phone call. A PHONE CALL? *boggle* He said it provided a human element to the correspondence and made his work more attractive to the agent (Marc is a charming personality so it's no wonder).

Now I am certain 90% of the agents out there don't want every person who queries to call them. However! If there are exceptions to the rule, or perhaps something I'm missing in this? Post or PM please.

suki
05-10-2009, 01:42 AM
Last night Marc Zicree was on Coast to Coast and someone asked him about how to pitch fiction. Marc went through the usual things, querying and conventions and all that.

But then he said something that made me pause and really think.

He said that when he pitched a book, he'd follow up on the query a week later with a phone call. A PHONE CALL? *boggle* He said it provided a human element to the correspondence and made his work more attractive to the agent (Marc is a charming personality so it's no wonder).

Now I am certain 90% of the agents out there don't want every person who queries to call them. However! If there are exceptions to the rule, or perhaps something I'm missing in this? Post or PM please.


This goes against what I have heard every agent ever presented with this question say. In most agencies you wouldn't even get past a receptionist, and they have nothing to do with the queries. I'm shocked he'd say that or that it worked. Was he pitching books, as opposed to scripts or media projects? Because I could maybe see it in other industries, but with literary agents? Not so much. Agents have even blogged about striking queries from people who call...

~suki

EzraHoliday
05-10-2009, 01:47 AM
This goes against what I have heard every agent ever presented with this question say. In most agencies you wouldn't even get past a receptionist, and they have nothing to do with the queries. I'm shocked he'd say that or that it worked. Was he pitching books, as opposed to scripts or media projects? Because I could maybe see it in other industries, but with literary agents? Not so much. Agents have even blogged about striking queries from people who call...

~suki

He said fiction novels. Mind-boggling.

Cyia
05-10-2009, 01:51 AM
More than mind boggling. At least one agent - who posts here - has said she goes so far as to delete the email queries of people who call her office sight unseen.

Calling is a bad idea. Very. Very. Bad.

EzraHoliday
05-10-2009, 02:16 AM
Right, I mean, these agents are people just like you and me... except they have a MASSIVE workload. Calling is just going to pester them.

I have queries out to 19 agents, 2 rejections so far and only a week has gone by. I'm not surprised at all, these are busy, busy people.

jclarkdawe
05-10-2009, 02:20 AM
When you have a page on imdb and wikipedia, you can do this (and probably should). Everybody else? No.

Let's say an agent gets 240 queries a week (some do a hundred a day). Each person calls up to thank the agent. Average time of call equals one minute. That's four hours a week. Or 200 hours per year. Or five weeks of work. Personally, if I was an agent, I'd prefer writers didn't call me and let me take a vacation.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

waylander
05-10-2009, 12:08 PM
Just don't

ChaosTitan
05-10-2009, 06:29 PM
This fellow is also not a novelist.

http://www.harpercollins.com/authors/13526/Marc_Zicree/index.aspx

He's a television showrunner and script writer, which is a completely different ball of wax than novels. The methods he uses to pitch scripts and stories aren't the same methods you want to use in securing an agent.

Madisonwrites
05-16-2009, 06:47 PM
Good point, ChaosTitan. Glad you found that.