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View Full Version : Emma is now a top name choice for baby girls. I blame "Friends."



underthecity
05-08-2009, 06:19 PM
See this article (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090508/ap_on_go_ot/us_baby_names).

I say it's Rachel's fault. When she had her baby on "Friends" a few years back, she decided on Emma for the name.

I yelled back at the TV, "No! That's an old lady's name!"

Because it was. My grandma's name was Emma Singer. My entire life, "Emma" has been synonymous with "old lady."

And now because of Rachel, more mothers are naming their baby girls Emma.

(No offense to any Emmas who might be on AW)

melaniehoo
05-08-2009, 06:21 PM
I don't blame Friends, even though it's one of my favorite shows. I've always loved names like Emma, Ella, Isabella... way before current shows and movies made them popular again.

WendyNYC
05-08-2009, 06:26 PM
Old lady names are back. I know a Vivian, Maude, Mabel, Josephine, Eva, and four zillion Emmas and Carolines.

My daughters have old lady names: Naomi and Charlotte. I always get "Oh, my great aunt's name was Naomi!"

ETA: My name totally shows my age, I think. Helllo, child of the 70s.

ChristineR
05-08-2009, 06:30 PM
Friends? Blame Ms. Watson!

WendyNYC, is right though--names cycle, especially woman's names. Most people won't name a baby girl the same name as a grown woman that they know. On the other hand, the name of the great grandmother that they barely remember seems romantic and charming.

Priene
05-08-2009, 06:31 PM
(No offense to any Emmas who might be on AW)

I'm sure Emma, my seven year old daughter, won't take offence.

BenPanced
05-08-2009, 06:49 PM
See this article (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090508/ap_on_go_ot/us_baby_names).

I say it's Rachel's fault. When she had her baby on "Friends" a few years back, she decided on Emma for the name.

I yelled back at the TV, "No! That's an old lady's name!"

Because it was. My grandma's name was Emma Singer. My entire life, "Emma" has been synonymous with "old lady."

And now because of Rachel, more mothers are naming their baby girls Emma.

(No offense to any Emmas who might be on AW)
If it bugs you so much, just tell yourself they're named after Diana Rigg's character on The Avengers. Suddenly, it's teh sexay.

TerzaRima
05-08-2009, 06:49 PM
There are some names that are classics--Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah, Anne--and I think I'd put Emma in with them. To me it doesn't pinge old or any particular generation, which is why it's a good name.

Wendy, I know what you mean. I went to school with boatloads of Jills, Kristins, Lisas, Amys and Heathers, and you don't see little kids with those names.

roonil_wazlib
05-08-2009, 06:58 PM
I love old names. I'm a big silent movie dork, so I've told myself that if I have a girl at some point in the future, I'm naming her Clara.

Poor unborn daughter.

I tell myself all of the new little Emmas running around are products of Jane Austen fans.

scarletpeaches
05-08-2009, 07:02 PM
I only know one Emma, and she's in her mid-twenties. Doesn't strike me as an 'old' name at all.

When I was at primary school in Birmingham there were four in my class. I still remember three of their surnames.

WendyNYC - I named one of my characters from an earlier novel Naomi. She was a right bitch. That was the novel of which an agent requested a partial so clearly the name doesn't do anyone any harm. Hope your Naomi is nicer than mine, though! :D

WendyNYC
05-08-2009, 07:06 PM
WendyNYC - I named one of my characters from an earlier novel Naomi. She was a right bitch. That was the novel of which an agent requested a partial so clearly the name doesn't do anyone any harm. Hope your Naomi is nicer than mine, though! :D

A bigger bitch than Naomi Campbell?

Naw, my Naomi's a sweetheart.

som1luvsmi
05-08-2009, 07:09 PM
I agree with names being cyclical. When it was time to name our kids, I noticed there was a HUGE trend of names that were unisex(i.e. Bailey, Sean, Kindle, etc.), were really different(i.e. Uniqua, T'Shaun, etc.), or just out there(i.e. Apple, Kal-El, Pilot, Audio Science- freakin' celebs!).

We decided on biblical names that had meanings that were important to us. And, they happen to be more old-fashioned: Noah, Elizabeth,Lydia and Joshua. (Noah happened to be really popular that year, by coincidence.) I like the fact that there aren't a hundred kids with similar names to theirs and try to show them that, too.

scarletpeaches
05-08-2009, 07:11 PM
I like unusual names, as long as they're not chavvy.

The amount of kids round here called Demi, Britney or Destiny is unbelievable. Some people shouldn't be allowed ovaries.

I name my characters and I'm happy with that. You can close a book but you can't ignore a kid if they want attention, so...:D

Captain Scarf
05-08-2009, 07:11 PM
I knew a girl called Emma. She'll be about 22 now.

She was lovely. She had long auburn hair and pale skin. I made her a character in one of my early works.

It would never have worked, but she remains one of those fond memories.

Jersey Chick
05-08-2009, 07:15 PM
My kids have boring ol' traditional names - Samantha and Jason.

I was one of about ten Kimberlys in my high school class. I think my name was second only to Jennifer for most popular girls' names in the early 70s.

Thanks for being so original, Mom. :D

scarletpeaches
05-08-2009, 07:23 PM
As a sidenote; check your emails in around 60 seconds, J-Chick. :D

Jersey Chick
05-08-2009, 07:28 PM
Oh... talk about yummy email! :D

Wayne K
05-08-2009, 07:29 PM
I don't know an Emma, and I'm old, so do the math.

Blanche and Mable are old, Emma Thompson isn't old is she?

Wayne K
05-08-2009, 07:29 PM
If she is I'm sure she's a MILF.

Devil Ledbetter
05-08-2009, 07:35 PM
My kids have boring ol' traditional names - Samantha and Jason.

I was one of about ten Kimberlys in my high school class. I think my name was second only to Jennifer for most popular girls' names in the early 70s.

Thanks for being so original, Mom. :DI think every girl I went to school with was named Kim, Jenny, Lisa, Lori, Cindy, Debbie or Michelle.

To make things even more predictable, Lisa and Lori were invariably sisters. Ah, the '70s.

Mela
05-08-2009, 07:53 PM
I'm a LORIE!
Not A Lori
or Laurie
or Laury

Is the Kyra phase over yet? I know a lot of girls named Kyra

Jersey Chick
05-08-2009, 08:07 PM
I think every girl I went to school with was named Kim, Jenny, Lisa, Lori, Cindy, Debbie or Michelle.

To make things even more predictable, Lisa and Lori were invariably sisters. Ah, the '70s.
One of my best friends was also a Kim. We were Kim2

I knew a LOT of Michelles as well. **sigh**

Kitty Pryde
05-08-2009, 08:20 PM
Emma's not really an old lady name. I'm in my mid-twenties and have had two Emma friends my age. I think it's a really awesome name. Anybody else notice that the top little girl names are very old-fashionedy grandma names, and the top little boy names are very traditional biblical/family sort of names? Weird. I'm glad to see the decline of Hayden/Jaden/Caden/Braden/Aiden, though. Not that there's anything wrong those names... The Top Tensies this year:


1. Jacob

2. Michael

3. Ethan

4. Joshua

5. Daniel

6. Alexander

7. Anthony

8. William

9. Christopher

10. Matthew



GIRLS

1. Emma

2. Isabella

3. Emily

4. Madison

5. Ava

6. Olivia

7. Sophia

8. Abigail

9. Elizabeth

10. Chloe

BenPanced
05-08-2009, 08:27 PM
Thankfully, giving girls the "junior" suffix doesn't seem to be catching on...

CaroGirl
05-08-2009, 08:47 PM
Caroline's a popular name right now? Wow. It's always been a classic but fringe sort of name, and often mispronounced as Carolyn.

I named my kids with names I figured wouldn't be too popular but not too let's-invite-teasing "out there" either. The year after I named my son, his name became a trendy GIRL's name! What's up with that shite, eh?

JLCwrites
05-08-2009, 08:52 PM
I thought it had to do with the movie "Emma" based on Jane Austen's book. The name has been popular for quite a while.

selkn.asrai
05-08-2009, 08:55 PM
Because it was. My grandma's name was Emma Singer. My entire life, "Emma" has been synonymous with "old lady."


I've so got you beat. My grandmother's name was Edna. That's right up there with Agnes for oldest of old lady names ever.

I went to school with a girl named Agathe (pronounced traditionally.) I always wondered if her parents gave the 'e' so it wouldn't look so curmudgeonly. Admittedly, it was initially awkward.

I also like to blame Emma on Jane Austen. But alas, it's a meager fantasy.

Devil Ledbetter
05-08-2009, 09:27 PM
The Top Tensies this year:


GIRLS

1. Emma

2. Isabella

3. Emily

4. Madison

5. Ava

6. Olivia

7. Sophia

8. Abigail

9. Elizabeth

10. Chloe My neighborhood is overrun with little Isabellas, Olivias and Elizabeths. At least they are pretty names. I prefer them over the late '90s trend of last names for first names (Spencer, Hunter, Parker, Jackson, Dylan, Madison, et al.) It was cute for a while, but after the 47th or so came along it started to give me hives.;)

Devil Ledbetter
05-08-2009, 09:42 PM
I've so got you beat. My grandmother's name was Edna. That's right up there with Agnes for oldest of old lady names ever.
My grandmother's name was Millicent. Some other old family names that haven't made it into the new "hip old name" category are Norma and Ramona.

I don't imagine these will find their way onto the charts anytime soon.

Kitty Pryde
05-08-2009, 09:47 PM
My grandmother's name was Millicent. Some other old family names that haven't made it into the new "hip old name" category are Norma and Ramona.

I don't imagine these will find their way onto the charts anytime soon.

Ah! I love 'Ramona'! Probably from the kids book series :D

My old grandma's names haven't made a comeback yet: Myrtle and Sylvia. I like 'Myrtle' but I think it's unpopular because the 'rtle' bit is kind of displeasing on the tongue. I think it's pretty written down tho. My grandpa was named 'Rema'. I don't even know where that came from because it's not in any of the baby name book/websites...

Sweetleaf
05-08-2009, 09:50 PM
I absolutely blame friends. My best friend is pregnant right now and she's always wanted to name a daughter Emma - she was a total Friends addict.

It's like there's so many Williams after Prince William. Personally I was gutted when I found out Ethan was a popular name; it was the only one hubby and I could agree on for son number 2. Oldest is Angus, so at least there won't be 5 of them in his class.

My grandmother's name was Olive, and her best friends were Elma, Thelma, Mabel and Doris. But then she was born in 1902. :)

ChimeraCreative
05-08-2009, 09:54 PM
I know at least four baby boys named Austin and six baby girls named either Madelyn or Madison. The madness has to stop somewhere. >.<

-An

BenPanced
05-08-2009, 09:54 PM
My best friend's nephew and his girlfriend named their daughter Hazel because they think it's a cool name. We need more "vintage" names right now; there are too many Britneys, Brittnays, Brittnees, Britknees, and Brittneas.

Pagey's_Girl
05-09-2009, 02:24 AM
I knew a girl named Emma in college. One of the nicest people ever. I also knew a Shiloh when I was growing up. (Another real sweetheart, BTW.)

Back where I used to work, we had five Joes, six Johns, three Seans, two Graces, two Nicoles, two Daves and two Mikes - all of whom were in the four departments I supported. I was constantly having to ask people which one they wanted.

(Just for the record, my real name is one of those odd/old-fashioned ones - Georgia Beth. Can you tell my entire family is from the deep south?)

Devil Ledbetter
05-09-2009, 04:22 AM
I know at least four baby boys named Austin and six baby girls named either Madelyn or Madison. The madness has to stop somewhere. >.<

-AnI was a La Leche League leader in the first half of this decade. For a while there, I could have sworn the hospitals were refusing to release newborn girls until the parents had put Madeline or Madison on the birth certificate. And boys had to be Ben or Jacob. No exceptions.



Back where I used to work, we had five Joes, six Johns, three Seans, two Graces, two Nicoles, two Daves and two Mikes - all of whom were in the four departments I supported. I was constantly having to ask people which one they wanted.
I work in a company of about 40 people. Four of them (10 percent!) are named Glenn. We generally refer to all of them by their last names.

scarletpeaches
05-09-2009, 04:57 PM
There are two little girls round my way called Britney and Alanis. I think their mother (hair bleached so much it's like cotton wool, has a dog on a bit of string, mouth like a sewer) was listening to ...Oops I Did It Again and Jagged Little Pill a lot when her daughters were born.

Wayne K
05-09-2009, 05:50 PM
There are two little girls round my way called Britney and Alanis. I think their mother (hair bleached so much it's like cotton wool, has a dog on a bit of string, mouth like a sewer) was listening to ...Oops I Did It Again and Jagged Little Pill a lot when her daughters were born.
Is she single:D

scarletpeaches
05-09-2009, 06:20 PM
She's the original 'good time that was had by all'. :D

Wayne K
05-09-2009, 09:53 PM
I like her already.

ReallyRong
05-10-2009, 02:52 AM
When our first child - a daughter - was born, myself and my Oirish wife had a long and arduous discourse over the child's name. She wanted one of those un-phonetic Celtic names like Niamh (pronounced Neeve) and I wanted something classical like Katharine. We eventually found a compromise with the phonetic Celtic name Cara. We were later horrified to discover in our local supermarket that it was also the name of a potato company..

WendyNYC
05-10-2009, 03:03 AM
When our first child - a daughter - was born, myself and my Oirish wife had a long and arduous discourse over the child's name. She wanted one of those un-phonetic Celtic names like Niamh (pronounced Neeve) and I wanted something classical like Katharine. We eventually found a compromise with the phonetic Celtic name Cara. We were later horrified to discover in our local supermarket that it was also the name of a potato company..

I know a Niamh, a Siobhan, a Caiomhe (pronounced quee-va, I might be misspelling it) and a girl with a Celtic name that sounds something like Mare-aide, but I've no idea how to spell it.

Yeah, it causes some confusion. I like Cara.

scarletpeaches
05-10-2009, 03:17 AM
I once taught tt42 how to pronounce 'Saoirse' over MSN. :D

Tepelus
05-10-2009, 04:29 AM
I have a cousin named Cara.

LAWolf
05-10-2009, 04:38 AM
Very interesting site (http://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager)to check out popularity of certain names.

JoNightshade
05-10-2009, 07:44 AM
And here I thought Emma was back because of Jane Austen... not that I like Austen, but it's better than Friends... sigh.


My best friend's nephew and his girlfriend named their daughter Hazel because they think it's a cool name. We need more "vintage" names right now; there are too many Britneys, Brittnays, Brittnees, Britknees, and Brittneas.

I have a little cousin named Hazel, after our grandmother (who passed away before she was born).

My other grandmother (living) is named Inesse (pronounced eye-ness) which she has always despised. She always asks people to call her other things. I don't think it's horrific, but methinks if the creature currently gestating in my belly is a girl, we won't be using that one... :)

The names I encounter most frequently in my age group are Jennifer (Jenny, Jenna, Jen) and Michael (Mike). Jennifer especially DRIVES ME CRAZY because my brain can never remember which variation on the name they want to be called. I'm always thinking, "Okay, is this the JEN Jennifer or the Jenny Jennifer?" And invariably get it wrong.