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jmascia
04-30-2009, 04:38 PM
Okay, now is the time to talk about how incredibly screwed up this country is. A couple of years ago, the first season of Sesame Street was released on DVD. Everyone knows Sesame Street, many of us watched the show as children and many of us plan on having our own children watching it. Here is the screwed up part. On each of these DVDs of the first season of Sesame Street reads the warning: NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.

If only this were a joke, but I assure you, walk into the children’s section of any Best Buy or FYE and you will see for yourself. How can a show designed for children, not be suitable for them, you may ask. Here, is the explanation given from the PR people.

Big Bird is obviously on something, because he hallucinates and is the only one who can see Mr. Snuffluffigus. Oscar the Grouch is apparently a manic depressive, not to mention a bum, since he spends his entire day inside a garbage can. Cookie Monster is your kids first introduction to a drug addict, he can’t get enough cookies. (PS – for those of you who have not kept up, Cookie Monster, though still named Cookie Monster, no longer eats cookies. He eats veggies now, as they are better for you and its okay to have an over abundance of them). Oh yeah, and the whole Bert and Ernie gay couple thing really threw some people off.

Beside the characters, they had complaints about the setting. Yes, the setting of the original Sesame Street looked a lot a real city setting rather than the magical street it is today. They also had some complaints about some of the situations. This may sound absurd, but in the very first episode, Gordon sees one of the children, upset, and invites her back to his house for milk and cookies. Now, though talking to stranger is something we should teach our children never to do, I highly doubt that Gordon is a pedophile.

If this is what our country has come to. Making us regulations against children’s programming, then I say let me out now.

Perks
04-30-2009, 05:18 PM
I had a friend apologize for not remembering how 'dark' and 'disturbing' Muppets from Space was. A group of us took our three year olds to see it when it was revived by a local theatre.

I couldn't help asking her if she was insane.

But I'll tell you, though, I do actually find The Cat In The Hat to be a subtly sinister book. I don't remember reading it as a child, but when I read it to my own kids, I was kind of taken aback at how wrong it all seemed. Lol! So, I'm crazy too.

BenPanced
04-30-2009, 07:00 PM
They've also put warnings on the DVD sets for Looney Toons and Tom & Jerry for the racial content in many of those.

jmascia
04-30-2009, 07:08 PM
Yeah, I know about those too. And like many of us who grew up in the 70s and 80s I grew up watching them on TV. But, I can understand why they would put it on them because those cartoons were honestly never intended for children when they were created.

I mean, don't get me wrong, it still pisses me off, but not nearly as much as the Sesame Street ones.

Team 2012
04-30-2009, 07:31 PM
Yep, Tom and Jerry were practically Klansmen, all right. Somebody has to protect us from outselves.

Maryn
04-30-2009, 07:35 PM
Putting on my "Think Like a Lawyer" hat (I'm not a lawyer), I bet the warnings are there not because anybody affiliated with PBS or the DVD distributor feels the content is not appropriate for kids but to sidestep lawsuits from parents who believe their children should only be exposed to warm and fuzzy things (leaving them unprepared for the real world and its hard corners). If the parent has been warned, they cannot file a lawsuit with any expectation of winning even if they believe the horrific content of Sesame Street has harmed their child irreparably.

Maryn, practical

Toothpaste
04-30-2009, 07:36 PM
This is the crazy thing about children's tv, film and books. Children and adults see them very differently. And this is why writing in this genre is so fascinating for me.

In "Alex" I have a sequence on a train where time is meaningless, where they keep repeating the same day over and over with no stop, and people are disappearing but no one except Alex notices. Zombies are then introduced as is a soul sucking machine. Kids love this sequence. Adults are freaked out by it. Adults see the horror of the situation, place themselves into it as if it was utterly real, and it gets to them. Kids just see the events happening as they occur. It's weird, but there must be an explanation. They don't see the nightmare of time having no meaning etc. It's two totally different ways of reading things.

Same with Sesame Street. I watched it as a kid. I never thought Oscar was a homeless person. He was a grouch and his home was a garbage can. Snuffleupagus wasn't an illusion, he simply was never there when others were. Ernie and Bert were friends who were opposite from each other. And the adults on the street were all pleasant and sweet and taught moral lessons.

But then adults come in and project their own world weary views on everything, and then they want to take away the joy and wonder for kids and give them "appropriate" material to watch. Adults really do ruin the good time for kids. They also seem to not understand them at all. Really frustrating.

Maybe adults should talk to the kids and see what they are seeing. As opposed to tell them what they think they are seeing. There's a thought.

CDaniel
04-30-2009, 07:38 PM
Sesame Street was my show of choice back when I was growing up in the 80's. It saddens me to here this.

I agree, if this what this country is coming too, get me a ticket on the first what ever, heading where ever.

Calla Lily
04-30-2009, 07:42 PM
Toothpaste: :Clap: Absolutely.

jmascia
04-30-2009, 08:13 PM
But that's just what I'm talking about. What was wrong with Sesame Street. I mean, really what's wrong with the Loony Toons and Tom and Jerry for that matter. They say it's too violent. I hate to say it, but when did you ever hear of a child trying to drop an anvil on someone's head or eat spinach so they could punch someone through the ceiling. Never happened.

The Fairly Oddparents on Nickelodeon had an episode a little more than a year ago when they went into one of these old cartoons and Timmy, the child character, who had never seen anything like that before says that it is the greatest display of "Non-Imitatable" violence he has ever seen. The key word is what I placed in the quotes.

But seriously, what child is going to watch Sesame Street and say, "Oh gee, Bert and Ernie are gay. I guess I'll be gay too." or "Wow. Cookie Monster eats cookies like my mom tilts back bottles of whiskey."

And you're absolutely right Maryn, one reason they do put it on there is so they don't get sued. But that still shows the sad state this country is in.

DeleyanLee
04-30-2009, 08:15 PM
Toothpaste makes a really good point, but I think there's a little something more to it:

Values have changed since the show was first aired. Having grown up in the 60's, I remember when the neighbors would watch all us kids and if I screwed up, any mom on the street could correct me and I took it, just as if she were my mom. There was a sense of community that's become lacking as people's lives got busier, as violence against children became more well-known and people became more suspicious and distrusting in general.

Not to mention such things as food, germ and other health awareness. Things like that didn't exist anywhere close to the obsession level it has now.

The world has just plain changed in the last 40-odd years. It totally doesn't surprise me that Sesame Street's first seasons have warnings on them because they cannot be viewed with the same mindset as they were originally. People don't think that way anymore. They can't.

It makes total sense to me why it has the warnings.

jmascia
04-30-2009, 08:16 PM
I would like to add one more thing to that. I watched Pinnochio (yes, the DISNEY movie). In the movie, the child runs away from home, ditches school, goes to an island where he smokes cigars and drinks beer, this is a movie we all watched as kids. Tell me 2 things. 1) Why do you think this one has no warning on it? and 2) How many of you after watching that movie as a child asked your mom or dad for a cigar?

BenPanced
04-30-2009, 08:20 PM
And it's not just cartoons getting edited (remember the run of Tom & Jerry cartoons where they redubbed Mammy's voice so she didn't sound "colored"?). A few years ago, probably 1997 or so, I was watching a rerun of Bewitched on Nick At Nite. It was when Samantha was expecting (sorry. We can't use the "p" word in this context! It didn't exist on TV back then!) Tabitha, and she was preparing for a dinner party. During one scene, she was unwrapping packs of cigarettes to put them into a box on the coffee table; because she was preg...expecting, the scene was digitally edited so it zoomed in AND YOU COULDN'T EVEN SEE HER TOUCHING THE NAKED CIGARETTES. And, yes, I've seen the original episode before this.

We've come a long way, baby.

CDaniel
04-30-2009, 08:38 PM
I would like to add one more thing to that. I watched Pinnochio (yes, the DISNEY movie). In the movie, the child runs away from home, ditches school, goes to an island where he smokes cigars and drinks beer, this is a movie we all watched as kids. Tell me 2 things. 1) Why do you think this one has no warning on it? and 2) How many of you after watching that movie as a child asked your mom or dad for a cigar?

No to the last. When I first saw this when I was a kid all I thought at the time was that it was a cartoon. Period. Oh and it had a lot of boring music in it. lol. :)

SPMiller
04-30-2009, 08:42 PM
The world has just plain changed in the last 40-odd years. It totally doesn't surprise me that Sesame Street's first seasons have warnings on them because they cannot be viewed with the same mindset as they were originally. People don't think that way anymore. They can't.I feel your forty-year estimation is way off, at least as far as the Dallas area goes. Random adults got on my case all the time as a kid in the late 80s to early 90s in both the middle-class burbs and the barrios across the Trinity. Pissed me off, too, which is why I remember it so clearly. I've always been a bit of a rebel...

CaroGirl
04-30-2009, 08:51 PM
My kids are 9 & 11 and have never watched a single episode of Sesame Street on TV. I, however, grew up as a S.S. consumer. In my memory, S.S. rocked (and The Electric Company rocked even harder; anyone remember a very young Morgan Freeman with a huge 'fro?). So, I decided to share the love with the wee ones. I found old S.S. skits on YouTube and showed my kids: the Yip-Yips (those muppets with the giant extendable bottom lips who shout "Book, book, book, uh-huh, uh-huh"), the tweedle-bugs (those low-IQ bugs who live in Ernie's window box and can't figure out how to work the car), and a host of other loveable S.S. weirdness. My kids LOVED it! They HOWLED at its silliness and inanity. I'd forgotten how gratuitously silly most of Sesame Street actually was.

At least as silly as... SpongeBob Squarepants or Fairly Odd Parents, shows that my kids watch daily with delight. You know, if anything needs a warning, it's bizarre, Pythonesque, psychedelic, SpongeBob frickin' Squarepants. At least Sesame Street TRIED to teach kids to read.

Cyia
04-30-2009, 09:05 PM
It's weird, but there must be an explanation. They don't see the nightmare of time having no meaning etc. It's two totally different ways of reading things.


The concept of time is learned, not instinctual. Kids don't understand it for a long time. Tell a 4 year old to sit still and quiet for 5 minutes and they think it's an eternity. A ten minute car ride feels like a year. They understand boredom, but not the physical units of time passing, so having a place where time means nothing fits in with their own perception of the world.


And this S.Street mess is a lot like what the "experts" said about Winnie the Pooh like 10 years ago.

Christopher Robin isn't a healthy child -- he has no real friends and exists in his own little world.

Eeyore -- clinically depressed

Pooh -- Obese and obsessive over-eater

Tigger -- promotes lying

jmascia
04-30-2009, 10:32 PM
Actually, my feelings on Tigger was that he had severe ADHD.

But even so, if the critics were saying those things about Winnie the Pooh, why no warning on the label? Why single out Sesame Street? The show was made for kids. It doesn't matter that times have changed. What was good for kids then should be good for kids now, especially since we have become so called "freer" with our censorship and whatnot.

Wavy_Blue
04-30-2009, 11:27 PM
*cringe* PC makes me die a little inside.

Soon we will all be working Christmas, schools won't be allowed to perform Fiddler on the Roof, choirs won't be allowed to sing any music composed by someone who was Christian, and heck, they might as well just ban money since it says "In God We Trust."

By then we will all look the same and dress the same, because heaven forbid we offend anyone with our beliefs and personalities...

AND GOD FORBID CHILDREN EAT COOKIES!!!!!!

Wavy_Blue
04-30-2009, 11:31 PM
I would like to add one more thing to that. I watched Pinnochio (yes, the DISNEY movie). In the movie, the child runs away from home, ditches school, goes to an island where he smokes cigars and drinks beer, this is a movie we all watched as kids. Tell me 2 things. 1) Why do you think this one has no warning on it? and 2) How many of you after watching that movie as a child asked your mom or dad for a cigar?

He also gets turned partially into an ass. :D

There probably doesn't need to be a warning because by the end of the movie, Pinocchio realizes these things are wrong and becomes noble and brave. Plus Disney has a heck of a lot of money to spend to get their movies distributed the way they want...without warnings.

Kathleen42
04-30-2009, 11:33 PM
I often suspect that Shelly Duvall' s Faerie Tale Theater would never have made it onto tv nowadays.

Williebee
04-30-2009, 11:34 PM
I learned a great deal from watching Sesame Street as a small child. Namely:



COOKIE!!!!


num num.

Lyra Jean
05-01-2009, 12:35 AM
I miss Sesame Street. Why are they trying to ruin my childhood?!

nahalwi
05-01-2009, 12:41 AM
hm....so, they don't like COOKIEmonster eating cookies, but they won't show kids the 'real' bugs bunny any more who ate carrots ALL the time or Popeye who ate spinach all the time...

I used to watch SS all the time when I was little. Always. I would go to the shows when they were in town. I learned how to count in spanish from them. I can't say much else, but I can still count to 10! I also have to say the one character I never did and still do not like is Elmo. Don't like him, have never liked him. Ever. And yet they push and push him on kids these days.

One thing that does really bother me is the idea that people associate Bert and Ernie with being gay. As a kid, that was never my thought. I thought of them as brothers. Best friends. Never sexual in any sense, and i think that's part of this 'growing up' that people do is they do, as Toothpaste said, start seeing things differently. And it's a shame that we can't see something that is (and has always been intended to be) innocent as corrupt and sexualized just because we are so used to viewing the world like that and can't separate reality from children's fiction.

SPMiller
05-01-2009, 01:05 AM
So what if they were designed to be gay? Negative reaction to the suggestion indicates the depth of socialized discrimination.

nahalwi
05-01-2009, 01:23 AM
So what if they were designed to be gay? Negative reaction to the suggestion indicates the depth of socialized discrimination.

If they were designed to be gay that would bring a topic that parents have every right to discuss with their children, just like parents should talk with them about things like when on a show a little girl blushes over some boy or a boy starts noticing girls. Yes, people discriminate. Should they, no.

However, it has been stated that they created the characters (Bert and Ernie) to be of about 5-6 years of age, despite the situation where they do not have 'parents' or are a traditional image of children.

Which brings to mind another question, would you want to have a children's program where the characters are 5-6 years old having any sort of sexual relationship? And to say or push that the two characters are gay would imply that they are aware enough and also sexually or romantically involved. If this were the case, I personally don't feel that has a place in a children's program (as an adult speaking and from an adult perspective).

That said, watching how the characters were (I don't know how they are currently) in the program, as a child watching them, I wouldn't have noticed or cared either way.

Sage
05-01-2009, 01:29 AM
This reminds me of when the first season of My Little Ponies (you know, the show about ponies and rainbows and friendship) came out, and there were reviews all over Amazon about how you shouldn't buy the original show for your kids because it was way too dark for children. Um... okay.

dgiharris
05-01-2009, 01:31 AM
... On each of these DVDs of the first season of Sesame Street reads the warning: NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.

If only this were a joke...

Big Bird is obviously on something, because he hallucinates and is the only one who can see Mr. Snuffluffigus. Oscar the Grouch is apparently a manic depressive, not to mention a bum, since he spends his entire day inside a garbage can. Cookie Monster is your kids first introduction to a drug addict, he can’t get enough cookies. (PS – for those of you who have not kept up, Cookie Monster, though still named Cookie Monster, no longer eats cookies. He eats veggies now, as they are better for you and its okay to have an over abundance of them). Oh yeah, and the whole Bert and Ernie gay couple thing really threw some people off.

Beside the characters, they had complaints about the setting. Yes, the setting of the original Sesame Street looked a lot a real city setting rather than the magical street it is today. They also had some complaints about some of the situations. This may sound absurd, but in the very first episode, Gordon sees one of the children, upset, and invites her back to his house for milk and cookies. Now, though talking to stranger is something we should teach our children never to do, I highly doubt that Gordon is a pedophile.

If this is what our country has come to. Making us regulations against children’s programming, then I say let me out now.

Please tell me you're joking.

The cookie monster doesn't eat cookies anymore but vegetables?

Are you F-ing kidding me?

When I hear adults talking about how 'bad' Sesame Street is I literally want to smack them.

Seriously, I want to smack them. Becuase obviously, verbal arguments and other options that require thought, analysis, and deduction have no sway. Thus, the only hope of them seeing how stupid they are is by smacking them, probably until they lose consciousness.

Why is it that we adults forget what it was like being kids?

Geez-f-ing-us.

Mel...

Rarri
05-01-2009, 01:37 AM
They're not showing Sesame Street at the moment, it's Sesame Tree!

I get tired of over-analysing children's programmes or movies, Disney films are horrendous if you look to closely but they've been a part of childhood for decades now.

backslashbaby
05-01-2009, 02:37 AM
Does anyone remember the flasher in the raincoat who was really showing letters or something :D ?

I love vintage Sesame Street!

You could you lose your purse or you might lose something worse on the subway:
http://www.yelp.com/redir?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv %3DWkPh8As-y6E

U Really Got a Hold On Me - Smokey and that U that won't take No for an answer :D:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyUxVCR0p9g

And my favorite: Stevie knows that uh ain't nobody gonna bring me down ;):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ul7X5js1vE

Bubastes
05-01-2009, 02:47 AM
I adore Sesame Street. I learned how to speak English by watching SS and Electric Company, and I probably managed to assimilate into American culture faster as well. I love SS so much that I know I can't be rational if I had to argue with the idiotic adults who insist on spoiling the fun.

And The Muppet Show! That was teh awesum as well!

badducky
05-01-2009, 02:58 AM
About the supposed "gayness" of Bert and Ernie...

When I watched B&E as a kid, I shared a room with my brother. He was serious and frowny. I was wild and crazy! When we were in hotel rooms, we shared a bed.

Because we were little kids.

Bert and Ernie might be gay, someday, when they grow up. At the moment, though, they are stand-ins for children, not for adults.

I think it is telling as to the success of the art form if adults project their own preconcieved roles upon the happy foam puppets.

I also suspect the people who follow the advice of the flyer are also the people whose kids need Sesame Street the most.

Clair Dickson
05-01-2009, 02:58 AM
If things are different today, it is because parents are afraid of every remote possibility and transmit that fear to their kid, (on purpose or accidentally.)

It's the mom who's afraid of dogs and every time a dog comes by, she tenses up. The kids will pick up on this and start to figure out that there's something to fear. Even if mom never says that dogs are scary, she is teaching her kid to be afraid.

Of course, I admit that not only is Sesame Street harmless fun for kids (esp. Classic Sesame Street) but I really just don't believe the world is a scary place. Sure, there are dangerous, but being afraid isn't going to help any more than being prepared will. Though, Media will tell you otherwise. Like the Summer of the Shark Attack! Where media made a big deal about the number of shark attacks, but statistically they were down that year (http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/science/03/13/shark.study/). I'm sure there are many other cases where the media coverage bred fear, making the world seem more of a scary place than it really is.

I plan to show my kids Sesame Street and those horrible Disney Movies, too.:rolleyes:

Super Geek
05-01-2009, 03:13 AM
Please tell me you're joking.

The cookie monster doesn't eat cookies anymore but vegetables?

Are you F-ing kidding me?

I had heard this many a time, but as someone who now has a child who regularly watches Sesame Street, I can say that this is not true. There are still cookies, and there is still NOM NOM NOM NOM. I think that they did a single episode where Cookie Monster promoted healthy eating episode and it was blown out of proportion. I've seen people freak out about green Elmo in a similar way since the "Elmo goes Green" special came out.

Sesame Street has turned into The Elmo Show a bit, but apart from that, it really isn't that different from the Sesame Street of my (80's) youth. They've added a lot of female muppets, which I think is a terrific change, and they show a lot of sketches that I watched as a kid. If I ruled the world, I'd push for a little more Grover and a little less Elmo, but I don't think my kiddo would be so happy with that.

dgiharris
05-01-2009, 05:30 AM
I had heard this many a time, but as someone who now has a child who regularly watches Sesame Street, I can say that this is not true. There are still cookies, and there is still NOM NOM NOM NOM. I think that they did a single episode where Cookie Monster promoted healthy eating episode and it was blown out of proportion. I've seen people freak out about green Elmo in a similar way since the "Elmo goes Green" special came out.

Sesame Street has turned into The Elmo Show a bit, but apart from that, it really isn't that different from the Sesame Street of my (80's) youth. They've added a lot of female muppets, which I think is a terrific change, and they show a lot of sketches that I watched as a kid. If I ruled the world, I'd push for a little more Grover and a little less Elmo, but I don't think my kiddo would be so happy with that.

Thank god. I can sleep tonight.

As for the Elmo take over. You can blame the 'tickle me Elmo' doll for that one. They must have made over a Billion dollars over that craze and subsequent derivatives.

But my favorite characters were Burt and Ernie. And like the above poster, as a child, hell even as an adult, them living together doesn't make them gay.

Were Chandler and Joey on Friends gay cause they roomed together?

Puh-lease.

Mel..

Lyra Jean
05-01-2009, 07:28 AM
Big Bird was always my favorite. I never noticed that Mr. Snuffleupagus (sp?) wasn't seen by any of the other characters.

I thought the whole Bert and Ernie thing about being gay was just a joke. I never thought people actually believed that was true.

What do people say about the relationship between Kermit the Frog and Piggy?

Wavy_Blue
05-01-2009, 08:34 AM
Early Disney movies are the best. Dumbo gets drunk and has a whole seven-minute long montage of hallucinations before he wakes up the next morning in tree. Bambi's mom get shot. Heck, there are BOOBS in Fantasia, for crying out loud.

Children's animation sure ain't what it used to be. Then again, The Hunchback of Notre Dame was very adult, and that movie isn't too old...

Kathleen42
05-01-2009, 02:36 PM
My boyfriend had never seen Labyrinth. Of course, as soon as I learned this, I made him watch it with me. He found it rather creepy and inappropriate for a children's movie. I reminded him that it was from the 80's.

jmascia
05-01-2009, 02:56 PM
THere is so much more on TV today then there was back then. So, I can't understand how these things that made it on TV back then are now innappropriate when the stuff on today is so much worse.

dgiharris
05-01-2009, 07:40 PM
THere is so much more on TV today then there was back then. So, I can't understand how these things that made it on TV back then are now innappropriate when the stuff on today is so much worse.

I think in the past we just had a better sense of our priorities vs the way the real world works.

I also feel that part of the problem is generational.

The 1960s brought us flower power and the birth of anti establishment
The 1970s continued the anti-establishment trend
The 1980s , The 60s and 70s generation start to become the establishment while their children form generation X
The 1990s, The 60s and 70s generation are now, "the Establishment" and start implementing the Mamby Pamby Yuppie feel good changes (no dodge ball, spanking kids is wrong, etc. etc.)
The 2000s, Mamby Pamby Yuppie policies and trends are in full swing

Now, at first glance I think this is counter intuitive, I mean, shouldn't the anti-establishment be more liberal in regards to what kids can watch?

I think this is due to the anti-establishment's need to 'protect' the kids at all cost resulting in 'shielding' them from as much harm as possible. When taken to the extreme, it leads to insane policies among other things.

Hmmm.... I'll have to think on this a little more

Mel...

Wavy_Blue
05-01-2009, 09:26 PM
Now, at first glance I think this is counter intuitive, I mean, shouldn't the anti-establishment be more liberal in regards to what kids can watch?


My thought exactly.

dgiharris
05-01-2009, 10:01 PM
I went away and thought some more.

I think I was a touch off. It's not so much the generation, but more so the drift of 'Academia' towards the left.

Now, Academia has always tilted to the left and in my opinion, the left is more progressive and if Academia had to tilt either right or left, I would prefer it tilt left.

However, it is just that the extreme left started the whole "Don't spank your kids" mantra in the 70s - 80s and it started gaining serious momentum in the 90s. Its not my intent to argue the right or wrong of that, but to just identify the starting point for the 'protection' of kids movement.

Taken to the extreme, there is this new philosophy regarding what kids can and cannot handle, what is and is not good for them etc and all of this is geared to 'protecting' kids from one evil or another.

And when you go to any extreme, be it right or left, you are bound to screw a lot of things up, which is what is happening now.

No dodgeball in school, playing sports without keeping score so 'everyone is a winner', getting upset because two male puppet characters live together, overreacting because a fictional puppet character has a make believe friend, etc etc.

Mel...

Cyia
05-01-2009, 10:08 PM
I still remember "U really got a hold on me" - one of my favorite SS bits as a kid.

Disney? Inappropriate for children?

Well, there's mob violence against the elderly in Snow White.

The afore mentioned underaged drinking in Dumbo and smoking in Pinnochio

Puff *cough* the magic *cough* Dragon

Cruella ---> DeVil <--- lived in Hell Manor ... subtlety at its finest, right along with Lucifer the homicidal fat-cat

Maleficent calls up the powers of hell in Sleeping beauty (which was probably one of the first "curse" words in a cartoon like that)

Classic Disney wasn't anything like the watered down "Disney-ized" dreck we see today.


And there can't be anything on SS or in Disney that compares with growing up to hear Mr. Conductor rattle off all those words you can't say on TV. ;)

SPMiller
05-02-2009, 01:35 AM
And who can forget Song of the South and the original Fantasia?

Oh, wait, those got censored long ago.

Cyia
05-02-2009, 02:12 AM
As did The Black Cauldron.

No more munchins and crunchins. :cry:

jmascia
05-02-2009, 09:16 AM
At least you can still find Black Cauldron and Fantasia on DVD. Song of the South has been banned pretty much all over and is impossible to find.

By the way... I love the Black Cauldron!!!! Thanks for bringing it up, Cyia!

jmascia
05-02-2009, 09:17 AM
PS Cyia, Puff the Magic Dragon isn't Disney. However, those too were good cartoons.

Lyra Jean
05-02-2009, 10:13 AM
Is Song of the South the one with Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox? If so, how can they get rid of that one?!

In looney tunes they got rid of Speedy Gonzales because it was considered racist against Mexicans but it's okay to keep the French Pepe LePew. The one who stalks "women" and cannot take no for an answer.

Wavy_Blue
05-02-2009, 10:33 AM
Is Song of the South the one with Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox? If so, how can they get rid of that one?!


It's "banned" because Uncle Remus is performed by a white actor in blackface. Not the greatest performing trend in American history. Though Disney has never officially said they will not release it. It just doesn't seem to be on the agenda as of right now.

Fantasia is currently out of print on DVD, but this has nothing to do with censorship issues, just Disney's standard "classics in the vault" treatment. It is slated for re-release on DVD and Blu-Ray in March 2010.

I can't wait. Such a fantastic movie with beautifully restored images...

jmascia
05-02-2009, 04:18 PM
Song of the South was also banned because the characters within it Brer Rabbit, Fox and Bear are also considered to be a bit racist (why, I don't know) and Disney has no trouble parading said characters around its parks. I have a bootleg DVD of it that is actually a rip from an old VHS tape. So, I get to watch that wonderful (and yes, it is a very good movie) anytime I want.

And Rosemerry, they pretty much banned all the Loony Toons, not just Speedy. You can't see the Loony Toons on any channel anymore (except maybe Boomerang which my cable provider refuses to get). That's why I buy the DVD collections they release for them every year, even if they are selective about the ones they put on the DVDs I still have a little piece of Bugs and Daffy.

nahalwi
05-02-2009, 07:17 PM
Uncle Remus was played by James Baskett who is not white. He was the first African American male actor to receive an Academy Award for his role in Song of the South. I believe he passed away shortly after making this film.

There have been many rumors of Disney re-releasing this film, but I honestly don't think it will ever happen. Not with the PC culture we've developed. The reason there is so much controversy over the film is because the African Americans in the film are shown as uneducated and servants/slaves to a white plantation family. It is meant to take place after the civil war during the 'reconstruction' period.

I think what bothers me the most is the reason they want to hide this movie is because people want to forget that period in American history. It's not pretty, it's not something we are proud of, but it still happened. I have a copy of the film and if anyone else is able to get a copy of it I highly recommend it, because things like this I want to save to show my kids. I think they did a good job of addressing some issues and telling stories in a way that is attractive to children and instead of ignoring the past, telling what happened and why we shouldn't let it happen again.

Cyia
05-02-2009, 07:28 PM
PS Cyia, Puff the Magic Dragon isn't Disney. However, those too were good cartoons.

Gah, you're right -- Pete's Dragon was what I was thinking of.

unthoughtknown
05-02-2009, 07:32 PM
Why is it that we adults forget what it was like being kids?


True.

Surely this thread is a joke?

WendyNYC
05-02-2009, 07:34 PM
There is so much out there now that is so incredibly NOT appropriate for little kids--girls are fed a diet of sexuality and prettiness (princesses to Bratz to slutty schoolgirl chic with Britney and others) and boys get huge doses of violence--and people are worried about freaking Sesame Street?

When little girls are wearing midriffs that say "So Many Boys, So Little Time" and underwear with "I'm Juicy on Tuesdays" emblazoned on the butt, we have bigger problems than Bert and Ernie living as roommates.

Jcomp
05-02-2009, 08:31 PM
Sesame Street is super sinister. Just ask Dave Chappelle (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i73dWYJqVHk)... (language warning, as if that's necessary)...

Rarri
05-02-2009, 10:09 PM
At least you can still find Black Cauldron and Fantasia on DVD. Song of the South has been banned pretty much all over and is impossible to find.

By the way... I love the Black Cauldron!!!! Thanks for bringing it up, Cyia!

It's on Amazon UK :)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Song-South-VHS-Lucile-Watson/dp/B00004RO2K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1241287767&sr=8-1

jmascia
05-03-2009, 04:36 PM
That's fine. However, unless the DVD is region free. i can't watch it anyway.

benbradley
05-03-2009, 07:04 PM
For what it's worth, I recall when Sesame Street first aired (November 10, 1969 according to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame_street)), I was 12 years old, I watched the very first episode because I had seen the blurbs on it and it was "something new" on TV, but it was obviously aimed at kids younger than me. If anything, I felt disappointed there wasn't something like that on TV when I was younger. It was obvious I seriously could have learned arithmetic and stuff from it at age 4 or even younger.

And the worst of these "features" of Sesame Street or other shows of the time wouldn't have contributed to warping MY mind anyway. I wanted to be like Spock because of my own "issues" that had nothing to do with the characters of Spock or the cantankerous Captain Kirk.

I went away and thought some more.

I think I was a touch off. It's not so much the generation, but more so the drift of 'Academia' towards the left.

Now, Academia has always tilted to the left and in my opinion, the left is more progressive and if Academia had to tilt either right or left, I would prefer it tilt left.

However, it is just that the extreme left started the whole "Don't spank your kids" mantra in the 70s - 80s and it started gaining serious momentum in the 90s. Its not my intent to argue the right or wrong of that, but to just identify the starting point for the 'protection' of kids movement.

Taken to the extreme, there is this new philosophy regarding what kids can and cannot handle, what is and is not good for them etc and all of this is geared to 'protecting' kids from one evil or another.
As an analogy, I've often read (even not having had children myself) how doctors say babies SHOULD be taken out and "exposed to germs" to build up immunities so they don't all of a sudden pick up every bug when they first go to kindergarden or first grade and get really sick. There's surely a psychological equivalent of that.

And when you go to any extreme, be it right or left, you are bound to screw a lot of things up, which is what is happening now.

No dodgeball in school, playing sports without keeping score so 'everyone is a winner', getting upset because two male puppet characters live together,
That last one is something more likely done by those on the political right, accusing the producers of Sesame Street of falling in line with the whole "Homosexual Agenda" thing.

But yeah, when every political ideology gets a veto of every possible idea in a children's program, it's bound to get very watered down.

jimpickens
05-04-2009, 02:20 AM
Society needs either an enema or just to simply lighten up this pc bullshit is killing this country.

jmascia
05-04-2009, 08:07 PM
ABSOLUTELY!