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Sophia
04-26-2009, 12:44 AM
Have you coined any terms to describe parts of your own approach to writing? In chat tonight DeleyanLee described her genius term:

Emovising: Revision for emotional content = emotion revision = emovision or emovising. Usage: "I'm doing the emovision on the chapter I just finished."

Do you have any terms you use? Perhaps we can compile a new AW writers' lexicon. :D

Mine:

Edwardising: Improving my YA hero.

Matera the Mad
04-26-2009, 04:40 AM
Nothing too noteworthy, but I do have a few pet things.

Horizontal thinking: Lying down and letting characters fool around in my head, with or without the added benefit of a nap. Very effective in getting things moving on. (Increased circulation to the brain? Wottever, works for me.)

The Dredge: Beta reader function, copying awful bits into a separate text document as I read

Remeaningfulize: Totally rearrange a paragraph so it finally makes sense :o

Apostrophlea: Misplaced you-know-what

Quossum
04-27-2009, 10:09 PM
Vomiting: When a first draft is spewed onto the page with no sort of thinking at all; the scene is spilling out wildly and will have to be seriously edited later.

Mental masturbation: Writing those darling scenes (often sex scenes, but not necessarily) that won't really advance the story and will have to be taken out later, but were oh so much fun to write.

Wordectomy: Okay, I didn't make it up; my junior high English teacher did (or found it somewhere). Refers to that first revision in which all the cluttered language is cleaned up, and results in at least a 10% reduction in the word count right away.

Barrett
04-27-2009, 11:28 PM
Gabbingflow

This is a stretch of dialogue which is free of tags and usually consists of one or two word replies. I find I have to watch for them, as they're fun to type.
Example:

"Hey."
"Huh?"
"Look."
"Whoa."
"Yeah."
"Umm...run?"
"Yep."
"Bye!"

DeleyanLee
04-27-2009, 11:32 PM
Literary orgasm: that moment when everything for a story just comes together perfectly.

That's thanks to a fellow in a long-dead crit group who said he couldn't write without one. It took us about 15 minutes to stop laughing and wipe the tears away.

Another one a friend uses that I like is: word vomit: Typing the exact perfect thing and totally bypassing the filters that normally would've held it back.

scarletpeaches
04-27-2009, 11:36 PM
Brainvomit: How I write my first drafts. No going back, no editing, no angsting. Just onto the page. That's it.

SIS: "Sort it, Shithead!" - What I say to writing buddies who utilise coincidences or other wanky plot devices in their novels which then go on to publication; yes thethinker42, this means you.

Wangsting: What emowriters do instead of getting on with it.

GGIW: "Gerronwi' gerrin' it writ!" What thethinker42 says when I'm telling her about what I'm going to write, instead of just writing it.

De-shitting: What I do to a first draft to make it slightly less...well, shit.

The "Ding ding!" moment: What happens when I have the characters, the inciting incident and the ending and I start writing. Around halfway through the first draft, something in my brain goes "Ding ding!" and it all falls together like it was planned.

I'm sure there are more. Lori will be along to continue my post. :D

CaroGirl
04-27-2009, 11:41 PM
Scribblage: The pre-writing process of scribbling down everything in my head. Requires severe editing later on.

De-that-ify: The process of removing excess "that"s in a manuscript.

Organ Grinding: Mostly applies to that most emotional of organs: the heart, and refers to toning down the emotion during certain to scenes in order to make them readable without excessive vomitage.

Matera the Mad
04-28-2009, 07:32 PM
Forgot this one:
Writegasm: What happens when I get up with a whole lot of story in my head.

Bubastes
04-28-2009, 07:59 PM
Word liposuction: the process I use to turn my WIP from flabby to faaaaaabulous. Usually involves sucking away at least 10% of the original word count.

Time sliver: a period lasting between 30 seconds and 5 minutes during which I add to my WIP. Eliminates the "no time to write" excuse. Lots of time slivers = a finished WIP!

Greenify13
04-28-2009, 08:10 PM
Confuzzlfying- making what-ever it is I am write more f*cking confusing then before...
Or is this___ confuzzling enough for you?

Greenify13
04-29-2009, 12:38 AM
What happened to Wayne's? I am really curious...hmmm

Wayne K
04-29-2009, 12:40 AM
Too much levity. The OP wanted serious answers, mine were a little over the top.

Greenify13
04-29-2009, 12:47 AM
Too much levity. The OP wanted serious answers, mine were a little over the top.
I see, :) maybe I should provide an example of why I use the word "confuzzling" for writing. Or one that I asked...is it confuzzling for...
My best example:
Post 5579 (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3302914&postcount=5579)

rugcat
04-29-2009, 12:58 AM
A term I use all the time and thought I'd coined until I saw it popping up in other places, is "Invisible writing."

By that I mean writing where the writing is so smooth and simple that the author, in effect, becomes invisible. The reader simply absorbs the story, never thinking about the language used. That's always my goal.

The exact opposite are the stylists that who amaze the reader with the beauty of their words or the lush imagery of their descriptions. Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet is a perfect example.

The pyrotechnic writers get all the press -- if the writer's invisible, they often get overlooked. It seems so easy that people think it really is easy.

Mad Queen
04-29-2009, 05:42 AM
Jellyfish character: A loosely defined character that can assume any role in a story at the writer's convenience. Everything about the character seems random, so consistency is never a problem.

thethinker42
04-29-2009, 05:55 AM
Brainvomit: How I write my first drafts. No going back, no editing, no angsting. Just onto the page. That's it.

SIS: "Sort it, Shithead!" - What I say to writing buddies who utilise coincidences or other wanky plot devices in their novels which then go on to publication; yes thethinker42, this means you.

Wangsting: What emowriters do instead of getting on with it.

GGIW: "Gerronwi' gerrin' it writ!" What thethinker42 says when I'm telling her about what I'm going to write, instead of just writing it.

De-shitting: What I do to a first draft to make it slightly less...well, shit.

The "Ding ding!" moment: What happens when I have the characters, the inciting incident and the ending and I start writing. Around halfway through the first draft, something in my brain goes "Ding ding!" and it all falls together like it was planned.

I'm sure there are more. Lori will be along to continue my post. :D

She pretty well summed up our joint writing lingo, but I'll add the following...

Those scenes(tm) - The term I use on my blog when referring to sex scenes. Always in italics.

Scarletizing - When I send a chapter or scene to scarletpeaches to see if it meets her approval. The responses are graded on a spectrum ranging from "S.I.S." (see her post above) to "R.M.N." (RITE MOAR NAO!) If the response is closer to the former, I'd better get it sorted. If it's closer to the latter, I've hit the sweet spot.

Darling Genocide - When I go through and rip my WIP's apart during the revision. I don't just kill my darlings, I slaughter them.

Nivarion
04-29-2009, 08:33 AM
heshewhatsit: when you don't use a single proper noun for far too long.

Chapter two disorder & Chapter four syndrome: The bags are packed and the ticked in hand. Now its time to go. That spot where you have your stage set, and your problem landed. But now it's time to write the beginning of the journey where nothing new happens for a while and you are in a slump.

BEAST AND THE HARLOT: where what your character does in the chapter can be summarized by the opening to Avenge Sevenfold's song "The beast and the Harlot (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8C9y_KY47E)." (the sound of it, you know, as in your character gets in there and kickes 10 out of 9 asses) and you have to tone it down.

damn: that point were all one of your characters can say is "Oh yeah well... F^&@ you!" *Dies* Or "Up yours A$$ HOLE" (like independence day, right before he flies the jet into the big laser of doom) *Dies* or last but most commonly "Damn" *Dies*

Damn happens quite often. It's a stupid last words thing.

Priene
04-29-2009, 12:15 PM
The misplaced we: when a writer transfers their own opinions onto humanity as a whole

ie

we find celebrities fascinating

Wayne K
04-29-2009, 03:29 PM
Y'know what? I thought of one.

The wife and I were batting around "A Life Gone Awry" coffee mugs and lunch boxes. I call it Memoirabilia.

Wayne K
04-29-2009, 03:30 PM
That one is real so I'm not deleting it.

thethinker42
04-29-2009, 03:41 PM
Y'know what? I thought of one.

The wife and I were batting around "A Life Gone Awry" coffee mugs and lunch boxes. I call it Memoirabilia.

*dies laughing* Best. Pun. EVER.

Love it.

Stijn Hommes
04-29-2009, 09:32 PM
Time sliver: a period lasting between 30 seconds and 5 minutes during which I add to my WIP. Eliminates the "no time to write" excuse. Lots of time slivers = a finished WIP! I disagree. I need so much time to get in the right mindset that a 5 minute time sliver is not going to be enough to be productive. I need at least 30 minutes to write something productive.

Sophia
05-01-2009, 12:32 AM
There are so many brilliant terms here; you guys are geniuses! Thank you for all the responses.