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JoeEkaitis
06-09-2005, 05:57 PM
Jim Lileks's Gallery of Regrettable Foods (http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html) awakened a few memories. As a mother of seven children (5M/2F), Mom had to come up with ways to feed us all. Chili ladled over mashed potatoes was actually enjoyable. I can easily imagine Wolfgang Puck doing the same thing with turkey white bean chili and garlic mashed potatoes, garnished with a cracker made from a net of toasted Cheddar shreds. Ditto for stuffed cabbage extended the same way.

But sometimes, things went terribly wrong, like the misguided concoction called "Three-In-One" (no, NOT the light-duty lubricant). An innocent meatloaf is set atop a bed of sliced potatoes, drenched in several cans of whole peeled tomatoes and peas, and baked until it nearly floats in a dual-strata liquid with a layer of red-tinted grease floating on top and an opaque red layer below. It was served by digging a spoon into the meatloaf until it hit the bottom of the roasting pan, and then scooped up with the potatoes, peas and tomatoes. A few spoonfuls of the pan drippings complete the presentation.

Mom and Dad loved it, but we put it away as best we could: eating the meatloaf and potatoes while spreading out the peas and tomatoes until it looked like we had eaten most of it (which never fooled Mom and Dad).

When I left home to live on my own, I vowed I would never make Three-In-One and I've never looked back.

Oh, and Mom and Dad still speak to us, even when we describe Three-In-One to incredulous in-laws at family gatherings.

Your turn. :)

eldragon
06-09-2005, 07:22 PM
My maternal grandmother, although a fabulous baker, was a pretty bad cook. Lumpy potatoes were common holiday fare.


Once, my sister was there because she had MONO....and apparently my parents didn't want her to infect us. (Grandma just lived next door). My grandma served her cream of wheat with tomato soup - mixed.

I rest my case.

Sailor Kenshin
06-09-2005, 07:22 PM
Three-in-one actually sounds quite yummy compared to what my mother foisted upon us.

http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/guus/drunk.gif

JoeEkaitis
06-09-2005, 07:29 PM
Three-in-one actually sounds quite yummy compared to what my mother foisted upon us.

http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/guus/drunk.gif
Do go on. Please. ;)

Sailor Kenshin
06-09-2005, 08:05 PM
My mother's cooking was the reason I learned to cook at an early age. Pure self-defense.

Like her trademark, carbonized onions. I mean little black tiles of what were formerly perfectly good onions, the stench of which crept into every surface of the house, never to be eradicated. http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/duckman/sick.gif

The one thing she made that I actually liked was chopmeat, with a can of kidney beans dumped in, and a can of tomato sauce, served over spaghetti.

She called it "chili."

Compared to the rest, it was gooooood.

oswann
06-09-2005, 08:11 PM
My mother once steamed a cucumber thinking it was something else, I imagine. It was a horrid, flaccid mess, but my father ate it anyway saying it wasn't so bad. He didn't want to hurt her feelings.



Didn't stop her divorcing him.
Os.

Sailor Kenshin
06-09-2005, 08:19 PM
I'm five posts away from having a PICTURE!!!!

Yay. http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/edoom/pokeball_smile.gif

thistle
06-09-2005, 09:11 PM
When I was in high school, my dad used to do all the cooking while Mom worked and took college night classes.

Dad also used to go hunting for squirrel. He never bagged any, though. He always "fell asleep in the woods."

I was a smart kid. You'd think I would have put two-and-two together when Dad didn't buy meat at the grocery store.

It wasn't until I came back from a year abroad that I finally realized why the chili always tasted so funny. I opened the freezer in the garage and found bag upon bag of frozen meat labeled, "Fresh game."

Yes, squirrel chili, squirrel stew, rodent-wiches.

Just to let you know: my dad was a big-time executive at a huge multi-national company. We weren't poor. My father was cheap, cheap, cheap.

robeiae
06-09-2005, 09:11 PM
Frito Salad...'nuff said.

Rob :)

Sailor Kenshin
06-09-2005, 09:18 PM
Frito Salad sounds goooooood!

JoeEkaitis
06-09-2005, 09:20 PM
Once, my sister was there because she had MONO....and apparently my parents didn't want her to infect us. (Grandma just lived next door). My grandma served her cream of wheat with tomato soup - mixed.

I rest my case.
Please tell us she didn't try to pass it off as "polenta the way your mother likes it".

thistle
06-09-2005, 09:34 PM
Maybe someone can help me with this mystery.

When I spent my year abroad in Belgium, I visited a friend in Germany. My friend wasn't there when I arrived, so her mom and I had lunch while we waited for her. I don't speak much German beyond asking for a beer and a W.C., in that order. Susanne's mom didn't speak English or French. We pointed and nodded a lot.

Anyway, Frau Kohler served me this really weird dish that was like thick tomato soup with chunks of beef and...bananas. The soup/beef combo was OK, but the bananas were...unexpected.

Has anyone heard of such a thing? Is this a common German food? No one I've talked to has heard about it...

oswann
06-09-2005, 10:11 PM
This is called the "play a joke on the foreigner to see what we can make them eat" dish. It's quite popular.



Os.

MadScientistMatt
06-09-2005, 10:19 PM
Yes, squirrel chili, squirrel stew, rodent-wiches.

Just to let you know: my dad was a big-time executive at a huge multi-national company. We weren't poor. My father was cheap, cheap, cheap.

My father sometimes served cooked squirrels too... but he never tried to pass it off as anything else. Brunswick stew is pretty good with them.

And there was a time my brother's pet rabbit got completely mean. It would, literally, bite the hand that fed it. We finally wound up shooting it and making it into stew.

But I think the worst dish in the family was when I tried cooking gingerbread. I was maybe nine at the time. I'm not actually sure what it tasted like. Nobody actually knew, because we only got as far as trying to cut it. Might as well have been trying to cut plywood with a kitchen knife. I never did figure out what I did wrong.

maestrowork
06-09-2005, 10:59 PM
Try making hard-boiled eggs with a microwave...

p.s. my dad had a big jar of Chinese rice wine filled with herbs and... baby mice and bugs and things I couldn't even recognize. It stayed in the kitchen cupboard for 3 years. Eventually he tossed it away (it just got too gross) at our (and my mom's) "gentle" suggestion...

Solatium
06-09-2005, 11:21 PM
Golly . . . about my worst food experience in childhood was getting a chicken sandwich at Wendy's and finding some gristle in it. I guess I had it pretty good. (And I was picky.)

Yeah, but then I went to a Seventh-day Adventist high school. Their vegetarian lunches were interesting -- things with names like Prime Stake (sic), Chik Fry, and Special K Loaf (which is exactly what it sounds like). I never understood the impulse among vegetarians to feed themselves on pale imitations of flesh meat; they're not only bad in comparison to the real thing, they're objectively bad.

One thing I actually did like was haystacks -- a buffet salad of corn chips, beans, shredded lettuce, cheese, salsa, and so forth. (Is this anything like the Frito salad robeiae mentioned?)

---

I suppose story about the Montana brownies would be OT . . .

Paint
06-10-2005, 12:37 AM
I was one of seven children too. (4b-3g) We had fried bologna. (balony?) Anyway...it curled up in the skillet and had pockets of grease in the center. We wolfed it down. Sick fare was milk toast. Butter toast heavily, pour over hot milk, salt and pepper. I consider it comfort food. We used to chicken fry squirrel. We always wondered why one pizza place in town had better pizza than anyone else. Finally they were arrested for putting Alpo dogfood horsemeat on the pizza. (This could be a childhood myth) Mom had a runny soup she called goulash. Ground beef, macaroni and ketchup. Amazingly I still want it when I go to her house!

BradyH1861
06-10-2005, 01:21 AM
My mom made this horrible, disgusting casarole. I have no idea what ingrediants went into it. I still gag just thinking about it. Anytime anyone came over to the house for supper, that is what she would serve. I refer to it as company casarole. She still threatens to make it for me from time to time...

Brady H.

arrowqueen
06-10-2005, 02:02 AM
My mother-in-law used to make tripe soup. I never ate any, but the smell and the look of it was quite enough to induce nausea.

arrowqueen
06-10-2005, 02:04 AM
Um...that doesn't quite qualify as 'childhood food'. Can I claim to have been a child-bride?

Fractured_Chaos
06-10-2005, 02:34 AM
My mother could burn water. Needless to say, we had alot of boxed, and frozen dinners. At least they were edible.

When Iw as 14, I gave my mother one too many grey hairs, so she sent me to live with my dad. He -liked- to cook, and was generally pretty darn good at it. He's the one who taught me, and taught me never to be afraid to experiment. This is much to my fiance's dismay, but I'll get to that in a minute.

My father, who is usually a wonderful cook, never used a recipe. He just seemed to have a knack. Like the cake he just threw together one time that had not just cinnamon and cocoa, but coffee, and mayo...and believe it or not...it was absolutely to die for. Unfortunately, he was never able to duplicate it. So don't ask me what all was in it, I couldn't tell you, if I tried.

But every now and again, he'd make something that defied description, and was just......horrendous!

Like the potato salad with radishes in it (I don't know what else he put in it, but it was disgusting). Or the attempt at coconut wine (which was tossed before it exploded). Cooking around my house was always an adventure, because you never knew what you were going to get. And I was always game to try -something- new and different. It might not be good, but nothing he made killed me. Well almost nothing....

He would always make fresh-squeezed lemonade in the summer, too. But he and I always disagreed about how much sugar went in it. He liked alot more than I did. So, my father decided to settle the arguement one time by not putting in any sugar at all. If I wanted sugar, I could add my own. Well, that was fine with me.

Except he forgot he did that, and took a huge swallow of lemonade...with NO sugar. At all! That time, I almost died!

From laughter!

My father was an avid fisherman. So when the weather was right, we always had fresh fish.

My dad also liked making his own bait.

He also made his own BBQ sauce, which he cooked in the crock pot on low for several days, adding ingredients a little at a time. And naturally, I was always sampling it the whole time it cooked.

One day, I came home from school, and discovered he had something in the crockpot that didn't look like his usual BBQ sauce, but remember, my father always experimented. It smelled funky as all get out, but that's not always so unusual around that house. So I took a taste.

It was the most gawdawful thing I had ever tasted in my life! And I've tasted some nasty stuff my father had made, believe me. NOTHING ever made me nearly gag and puke quite like that...whatever it was did.

So here I am, hanging overt the kitchen sink, making horrible retching noises, when my father walks in, and just leans against the doorway with his arms wrapped around his stomach, laughing until tears ran down his face. I, personally, failed to see the humour in the situation, but he sure did!

When I stopped wretching, and rinsed my mouth out with whatever was handy (Dad, bless his heart, handed me his beer), and when my father could finally catch his breath, he calmly informed me that he was cooking up a new bait recipe. I know it had liver and limberger cheese in it, I don't remember what else.

I don't think we ever got rid of the smell either.

Come to think of it...Dad ended up throwing away the crock pot.

But he did catch some big-azzed catfish that year.

As for what my father teaching me about cooking that my fiance regrets? I'm a very good cook (I will follow a recipe for some things). I've even -tried- to screw up, and it just doesn't happen. So, needless to say, Sam has gained some weight since we met, and he blames it all on me! :ROFL:

Sailor Kenshin
06-10-2005, 02:40 AM
Okay, y'alls are making me hungry.... http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/Bizkit/sweat.gif

astonwest
06-10-2005, 02:43 AM
Once had a babysitter who accidentally set a wooden spoon on fire with the gas stove, while cooking Ramen noodles or mac & cheese or something...

robeiae
06-10-2005, 04:07 AM
Once had a babysitter who set a couch on fire with a lit joint while cooking her brain...

Rob :)

Maryn
06-10-2005, 04:56 AM
I was in my first apartment when I learned that vegetables didn't come in 6 x 8 x 2 rectangles but could be purchased fresh and were really rather tasty. Who knew?

My mom was a lot of terrific things, but cook wasn't among them.

Maryn

PattiTheWicked
06-10-2005, 05:14 AM
My childhood food trauma stems from the fact that my mom, at some point in the 1970's, went through a phase where we were all going to eat health food. This didn't actually mean eating heathfully, apparently, it just meant not buying things that were commercially popular. While other kids had bumblebee tuna with Miracle Whip on Wonder bread sanwiches, I ate generic tuna with HOMEMADE mayo on some kind of weird brown cardboardy stuff. Other kids had Jif, I got pureed peanuts. I used to love sleeping over at friends' homes because sometimes I'd get Frosted Flakes or donuts for breakfast instead of grape nuts.

I think probably the worst part was when my mom decided that she was going to start making me balogna sandwiches for lunch and we were short on that homemade mayo. Instead, I had a balogna and BUTTER sandwich. She must have thought this was a great idea, because she packed me one every week until I got to seventh grade and started buying my own lunches. When cafeteria mystery meat is looked forward to with pleasure, you know something is very wrong.

sgtsdaughter
06-10-2005, 05:37 AM
:scared:BRAUNSWIGER!!! My mom packed that crap everyday for years. Years! Mayo and a slice of American cheese. OMG, the smell still makes me ill.

My dad finally started going to the grocery store, very long story there. Then the nasty lunch meat from hell ended.

Oddly, my brother (who was in high school while I was in elementary) ordered his lunches with onions and mustard. He found some poor hapless souls to trade with for awhile. Me . . . little kids laugh, make fun, and run away from you when your lunch looks and smells that bad. :Shrug:

There are many more . . . her meatloaf. I used to sing a song about it, to everyone's delight but hers. Would post it her, but I fear that some unlucky chance would happen and she would see it. That would bring death by meatloaf.

Breaded porkchops (I've always had issues with pork too, so that made it even worse.)

Cornbread that was soooooo dry that it felt like crackers cracking in your mouth.

Needless to say, this isn't even the tip of the iceburg. I'll stop now--afterall, I am trying to eat my dinner. I learned to cook at a young age for reasons of self defense. My siblings, dad, and me all fought to cook. Then again, dad opted for eating out about twice a week too.

Inspired
06-10-2005, 05:40 AM
:scared:BRAUNSWIGER!!! My mom packed that crap everyday for years. Years! Mayo and a slice of American cheese.

Awwww. You're bringing back fond memories for me. Now, when the bloodwurst comes out with the homemade head cheese and mincemeat pie, you'll see me gagging. Pickled eggs, pickled pigs feet, pickled brussels sprouts - if you can fit in a jar, my mom can pickle it!

LieselGarmach
06-10-2005, 05:46 AM
My mother burned the canned creamed corn every time she tried to make it for over 4 years. She finally gave up when my father started writing her attempts on the calendar.

Dad, however, was one of the first in their "circle" to own a home microwave back in the very early 70's. He brought home a frozen pizza and made us all watch it.... "Look at it bubble, kids! Isn't this just great?"

It didn't brown, tasted like cardboard with tomato paste on it, and the cheese all melted to the side of the oven because the counter wasn't level.

sgtsdaughter
06-10-2005, 06:06 AM
More . . .

Powdered Milk. Mom tried to fool us by mixing it with a cup of regular milk, and she kept it in milk cartons in the fridge. Yuk.

Most of my Bunchi's cooking. Gawd. She could ruin a ham and destroy noodles. Lets not go there. Made a couple of great dishes (messed with everyone's minds and only gave me the real recipe).

Coici Helen's cooking. Ask any family member and we will all tell some fine tales of feigning illness to get out of her meals.

Duck's blood soup. A Polish delicacy, but not for this US born girl.

My mom's beer chicken. You heard it. She loved it--everyone else hated it. Yuk.

My sister's version of Kabolsa--sauted with green peppers, onions, mushrooms, and ketchup. There was a strange mixture of spices--garlic, rosemary, and I don't know what else. White gravy garnished the top. Then, if the gravy wasn't bad enough she served it over some kind of flavored rice. Man . . . that was beyond bad.

My brother's tomato soup--take a can of Campbell's, throw in noodles or rice, cook, and then stir in a scrambled egg like you would for egg drop soup. Garnish with garlic and cilantro. Eeew.

Sadly, my sister and brother's mother was/is an excellent cook. Gets paid well for it. Didn't pass on to them though.

Okay, I really have to stop now. I you folks could see my face at these memories you would die of laughter.

MadScientistMatt
06-10-2005, 06:08 AM
Health foods? Ok, looks like I forgot - I do have one real horror story from my childhood.

I had some pretty bad alergies growing up. My parents took me to an experimental blood test to see if they could find a new treatment - the normal thing is a shot a week, and that's pretty painful. Well, this test claimed that someone in the family was alergic to pretty much every grain in creation. With two exceptions: Rice, and buckwheat.

So my mother tried to bake bread with nothing but rice and buckwheat. Never worked. So we wound up going on a diet of rice cakes. I had a tendancy to chew on weird things at the time, and I can tell you that rice cakes really do taste almost exactly like eating a Styrofoam cup.

Then a later alergy test turned up that nobody in our family had any grain alergies at all. Whew.

WVWriterGirl
06-10-2005, 07:52 AM
My mom was generally a good cook, but there are a few things that she makes that stand out like a sore thumb.

The first is her version of "Hungarian Goulash". Our driveway is about 1/4 of a mile long, and I could smell that crap cooking when I got off the bus. No meat - just cabbage, hot banana peppers, onions, green peppers, and whatever other vegetable she had slowly decaying in her fridge. A can of either tomato paste or sauce, simmer 'till limp and slimy, and you've got goulash. The smell alone made me wanna puke...I never ever ate the stuff.

The second thing she made that I absolutely detest is pinto beans. Had someone else made them, I might like them...but she loads them down with pepper. Now, I live in the south, and liking pinto beans and cornbread is pretty much a requirement for living here. She's effectively ruined it for me. My husband will eat 'em (they're his favorite food), but they make him sick to his stomach every single time. Apparetly my father either has an iron stomach or he's just become desensitized over the years.

WVWG

mkcbunny
06-10-2005, 07:56 AM
Instead, I had a balogna and BUTTER sandwich. She must have thought this was a great idea, because she packed me one every week until I got to seventh grade and started buying my own lunches.
My mom was the queen of making food from nothing, and food for cheap. [We were always low on cash at the end of the month; steaks at the beginning, and beans at the end.] One of the budget dessert/snack treats she made was brown sugar sandwiches, which were white bread spread with butter and brown sugar. They weren't bad.

She was also really big on just the types of meals served in the aforementioned Regrettable Foods. She loved working with Jell-O and used elaborate molds for her experiments. More than once, she made aspic, which was basically clear gelatin with tomato soup or tomato juice in it. I think it had pickles, as well. Yeeegh, it was disgusting. She also made the fruity and creamy varieties of Jell-O desserts, and many involving blended cottage cheese. All of those were better than the aspic.

She was also a big SPAM fan and tried to pass it off for Easter ham one year. Fried. With pineapple rings.

BradyH1861
06-10-2005, 08:31 AM
Whenever mamma went on a diet, my brother and I were the only ones who lost any weight.

Brady H.

Inspired
06-10-2005, 03:38 PM
We joined a church where there were a LOT of elderly. Imagine my lack of surprise when I found jello with suspended prunes at the first potluck. They were happy old ladies.

BlueTexas
06-11-2005, 09:34 AM
Grandma's Holiday Jello:

Green/Lime Jello
Olives
cherries
pineapple
bite-sized chunks of white american cheese
walnuts
mandarin oranges

It looms at us from the dead-center of the table every year, and we've all feigned olive allergies at one time or another.

sgtsdaughter
06-11-2005, 11:37 AM
Grandma's Holiday Jello:

Green/Lime Jello
Olives
cherries
pineapple
bite-sized chunks of white american cheese
walnuts
mandarin oranges

It looms at us from the dead-center of the table every year, and we've all feigned olive allergies at one time or another.

OMG!!! At first I thought that you were talking about her jello and then things you didn't like. Those all mixed together . . . your innerds have my sympathy.

Solatium
06-11-2005, 08:09 PM
Olives? Jeez! I thought the canteloupe and mushy bananas in our Jello were bad.

Inspired
06-11-2005, 08:16 PM
I once had the joy of seeing lime jello with shredded carrots and a dollop of mayo on my plate when I was a dinner guest. I faked a smile and tried it.

It was actually good! I know, it sounds awful! She must've put some secret ingredient in it, because I really liked it. Well, not enough to make it myself or request it, but it was good.

check out this yummy recipe: http://www.nikibone.com/recipe/jello/spamjello.html

Sailor Kenshin
06-11-2005, 09:31 PM
I once had the joy of seeing lime jello with shredded carrots and a dollop of mayo on my plate when I was a dinner guest. I faked a smile and tried it.



Jello salads with mayo are yummy! (try Perfection salad on a lettuce-lined plate with a good dollop of half mayo, half plain yogurt on top). http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/cwm/cwm/lurk.gif

Paint
06-11-2005, 10:06 PM
Grandma's Holiday Jello:

Green/Lime Jello
Olives
cherries
pineapple
bite-sized chunks of white american cheese
walnuts
mandarin oranges

It looms at us from the dead-center of the table every year, and we've all feigned olive allergies at one time or another.

I nearly fell out of my chair laughing at this one! I think I remember it from somewhere! I like mayo on jello salads too.

Richard
06-11-2005, 10:16 PM
Three words:

English. School. Dinners.

If you can corn it, stick it with slobbering swedes and finish it up with semolina, it's been served up at some point.

ritinrider
06-13-2005, 03:25 AM
Oh my gosh. Here I thought I was the only kid in America (or the world even) choking down bad food. Of course some of you weren't choking at the same time I was, your parents were. That makes me ask, what kind of cooks were your grandparents?

For myself, my mother was known (at least to my kids and myself) for her green, greasy, dressing. Yuk. I don't have any idea why it looked green, but it did. My poor mil tried to figure it out one time asking me all kinds of questions about what my mom put in it. She thought she could find the problem and tell me so I could telll my mom how to fix it. I don't think so.

Another one that stands out in my memory is 'blackend shrimp', waaaaaaay, before blackened anything was popular. And hers wasn't blackened from pepper, but from over cooking.

And yes, I actually heard the comment, "there are children in Aftrica starving right now, and you're turning up your nose at perfectly good food" OK, if the children in Africa had my mom's cooking, they would still be starving. And, how did my eating bad food help them. Mind you, I never ask these questions, they were just there.

Here's to good eating in your future.

Nita

Fractured_Chaos
06-13-2005, 04:26 AM
For myself, my mother was known (at least to my kids and myself) for her green, greasy, dressing. Yuk. I don't have any idea why it looked green, but it did. My poor mil tried to figure it out one time asking me all kinds of questions about what my mom put in it. She thought she could find the problem and tell me so I could telll my mom how to fix it. I don't think so.

Too much sage? My mother had the same kind of dressing. We were never so happy as we were the day Stove-Top came out.


And yes, I actually heard the comment, "there are children in Aftrica starving right now, and you're turning up your nose at perfectly good food" OK, if the children in Africa had my mom's cooking, they would still be starving. And, how did my eating bad food help them. Mind you, I never ask these questions, they were just there.

Here's to good eating in your future.

Nita

My mother tried to say the same thing to me. I told her that maybe we should just mail my share to those kids.

I was grounded for two weeks after that. I wonder why?

ritinrider
06-13-2005, 04:49 AM
Too much sage? My mother had the same kind of dressing. We were never so happy as we were the day Stove-Top came out.


Oh, yes, Stove-Top, the saver of many a holiday feast. We love it at our house, of course we 'doctor' it a bit. And I can actually make edible cornbread dressing, thanks to my mil.


My mother tried to say the same thing to me. I told her that maybe we should just mail my share to those kids.

I was grounded for two weeks after that. I wonder why?


At least you were brave enough to voice your opinion. I kept mine to myself, not wanting to end up in the backyard somewhere dazed and confused.

Nita

TheNightTerror
06-14-2005, 05:04 PM
Let's see here . . .

The only real culinary horror I can think of was my fault. A friend of mine was over, and we were hungry. My father refused to cook anything for us, so we thought, hey, we can make macaroni and cheese!

First part, cooking the noodles, went fine. Then, it happened.

"Hey, what's that date on that milk mean?"

"Don't know. It looks like it's about a month overdue!"

"Hmmm. Let's try it anyway!"

*shivers*

I emptied half a carton worth of chunks into that pot before I realized something was wrong. Then, I went to dearest father, asked him what I should do, and his response was: "eat it, you made it! Don't waste food!"

Macaroni and cheese soup with rotten milk . . . don't try it.

On the other hand, chocolate syrup on rye bread is actually good! That I ate on a dare. I got some of the stuff you pour into milk to make chocolate milk, and smeared it all over a piece of break like it was butter. I actually wolfed it down. Hot chocolate with 10 tablespoons of powder in it, that's too much. *shivers*

bluwinteryfox
06-16-2005, 10:27 PM
I didn't think I'd be able to finish this thread because I was laughing so hard. I'm glad to know that my mother wasn't the only one who should have left the cooking to those who could.

We had this chicken thing once a week, generally on Wednesday. I don't know why Wednesday, but that's when it was. It was generally legs and thighs covered in cream of chicken soup mixed with some strange spices and baked in the over till done. Yuck. I cannot eat baked chicken because of that.

PattiTheWicked
06-16-2005, 10:53 PM
And yes, I actually heard the comment, "there are children in Aftrica starving right now, and you're turning up your nose at perfectly good food" OK, if the children in Africa had my mom's cooking, they would still be starving. And, how did my eating bad food help them. Mind you, I never ask these questions, they were just there.



One time my mom actually said that to me, during the Battle of the Brussell Sprouts.

"You better eat that. There are kids in the world who don't get enough to eat every night."

I said, "Maybe you should mail them my Brussell Sprouts."

That got me sent to my room pretty damn fast.