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dirtsider
04-06-2009, 11:18 PM
I have a secondary character that has a permanent limp caused by an accident (from doing urban, underground exploring). I was thinking a very bad broken leg but nothing so drastic as being confined to a wheel chair. (Unless it turns out to be very cool reason.) I was wondering if any of you had something more interesting.

The main thing about this is that the secondary character is someone who knows one of my MC's and used to go out and investigate a lot of the things my MCs are doing now. But because of the injury, he can't go out and actually do that anymore but is available as a sort of clearing house for information.

TheIT
04-06-2009, 11:50 PM
Try this thread:

Walking With a Permanent Limp?
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=129188

Maryn
04-07-2009, 12:15 AM
While it's easy to come up with a reason for a limp, most urban exploration would be slowed by a limp but still possible. I think you may need to make him far less mobile, like able to walk only with the use of a cane. Make him unable to use ladders, climb in or out of windows, scramble up or down debris piles, or walk on tilted concrete.

Maryn, whose kids know urban explorers

dirtsider
04-07-2009, 12:52 AM
Yeah, I was thinking that he'd have something to the point where he's not quite wheelchair bound but not mobile enough to go urban exploring. And I like the visual of him having a cane which would work in several layers. (The secondary character is a mage like one of the MC's who knows him.) It's a walking tool and a magical tool as well. And the occasional weapon when someone's stupid enough to think that limp equals weak.

Thanks!

50 Foot Ant
04-07-2009, 09:52 AM
I broke my leg in 1992 and still limp to this day. I had to walk on a hairline fracture, and it twisted slightly, so my foot sits about 10-15 degrees outward rotation.

It hurt, but I was still able to walk on it and carry weight, but the stress twisted the bone slightly, and by the time they found out, the only correction would have been major work, and not worth it.

So your character could have broken his leg, thought he sprained his knee, and walked back to his car, and the exertion could have twisted the bone slightly, and rather than bother to get the expensive, painful, and time consuming fix he's happy with the limp and uses the cane to get around in wet weather.

dirtsider
04-07-2009, 04:28 PM
I broke my leg in 1992 and still limp to this day. I had to walk on a hairline fracture, and it twisted slightly, so my foot sits about 10-15 degrees outward rotation.

It hurt, but I was still able to walk on it and carry weight, but the stress twisted the bone slightly, and by the time they found out, the only correction would have been major work, and not worth it.

So your character could have broken his leg, thought he sprained his knee, and walked back to his car, and the exertion could have twisted the bone slightly, and rather than bother to get the expensive, painful, and time consuming fix he's happy with the limp and uses the cane to get around in wet weather.

Ohh. Ouch! But a cool idea. Thanks!

Deb Kinnard
04-07-2009, 05:02 PM
I'm thinking, nerve damage in the hip? Maybe when the injury first occurred, they didn't diagnose it correctly, and let a fracture "cool down" for a couple of days before reducing it. This might cause the injured nerve to swell and not heal properly once the fracture was set.

A "traction injury" or overstretched nerve can cause this. Nerves heal (if they do) at about half an inch a month. So it could be a long time before his nerve shows any appreciable improvement.

RJK
04-07-2009, 06:40 PM
After a major break, there's a good chance arthritis will come along in the closest joint. If it is severe enough, he won't be able to put weight on the leg when it's bent more than a certain amount, like to climb a ladder, or even stairs. The pain will cause him to fall, in order to get the weight off that joint. A slight limp when walking, an impossible task when faced with a ladder.