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TsukiRyoko
03-27-2009, 02:06 AM
I have a few questions that you guys might be able to help me with for a story I'm writing.

First set of questions: In the event of a nuclear bomb attack, what would most likely happen to the bodies closest to the explosion? I know some bodies would be burned badly (ugh, the pictures!), beyond recognition, victims found further away would have burns, radiation poisoning, etc (and probably wouldn't live very long, if at all), but what would happen to the bodies right next to the explosion? Would they vaporize completely is they were that close to the hypocenter? Would there be bones or any other remains from the victims found?

Second set of questions: What group of people would most likely want to tour a place like a cryogenic freezing lab, or some other new, nearly science fictional technology? Is there a board of scientists currently in existence who would be interested in this?

Thanks a bunch in advance :D

semilargeintestine
03-27-2009, 02:12 AM
For the first one, you should watch a great documentary called White Light/Black Rain (http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/whitelightblackrain/). It's pretty heavy, but it really lets you see what it was like for the people on the ground.

This (http://bepreparedcalifornia.ca.gov/EPO/BeInformed/RadiationEmergencies/Nuclear+Blast.htm) is also a good website to look at. It gives warnings for what people should do as well as what could happen as a result of being near a nuclear blast.

TsukiRyoko
03-27-2009, 02:13 AM
For the first one, you should watch a great documentary called White Light/Black Rain (http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/whitelightblackrain/). It's pretty heavy, but it really lets you see what it was like for the people on the ground.

This (http://bepreparedcalifornia.ca.gov/EPO/BeInformed/RadiationEmergencies/Nuclear+Blast.htm) is also a good website to look at. It gives warnings for what people should do as well as what could happen as a result of being near a nuclear blast.
Thank you, I will definitely look into those :)

semilargeintestine
03-27-2009, 02:14 AM
Check out this (http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1552677/what_happens_when_a_nuclear_bomb_explodes/) too. It's a short 2 minute video with a scientist explaining how a bomb works along with actual footage from tests.

blacbird
03-27-2009, 04:31 AM
I have a few questions that you guys might be able to help me with for a story I'm writing.

First set of questions: In the event of a nuclear bomb attack, what would most likely happen to the bodies closest to the explosion?

Vaporization. Seriously. Nothing left. If you want to have some remains, you need to determine how far from the explosion the people need to be in order for actual bodies to be left. And this also depends on the magnitude of the nuclear blast, which can vary greatly.

caw

TsukiRyoko
03-27-2009, 06:29 AM
Vaporization. Seriously. Nothing left. If you want to have some remains, you need to determine how far from the explosion the people need to be in order for actual bodies to be left. And this also depends on the magnitude of the nuclear blast, which can vary greatly.

caw
That answers my question perfectly. Thanks ;)

Namatu
03-27-2009, 04:57 PM
I will add that the fallout from a nuclear blast can travel far and wide on air trails, hundreds of miles or more. The level of radioactivity at those more distant locations will naturally not be as strong, and the populace might not experience any ill effects that they can trace back to it (if they even know about it).

kct webber
03-27-2009, 05:14 PM
The Bird is right. Generally. Keep in mind, however, that you have to take into account whether the bomb is a ground burst or an air burst. For a ground burst, even small hills make enough of a difference that you may find some remains even somewhat close to the blast. Just some scattered, blackened bones, most likely. But if it's an air burst, the terrain matters far less. The direction of the blast will go down onto everything, rather than up and out like it will in a grown burst. Even with an air burst, though, certain terrain still matters. Caves. Deep basements under large buildings. They'll be dead. But you may find remains. Terrain matters.

And further, when you say 'right next' to the center of the blast, it's not really clear what you mean by 'right next to'. When nukes are involved, 'close' takes on a whole new meaning. Are we talking a mile? Or meters?

Soccer Mom
03-27-2009, 07:04 PM
First: TSUKI!!!!!!!!!!!!!! TACKLE HUGS!

Second: ahem. Gonna move this to Experts and Research, but I'll leave one of those handy-dandy redirect thingymabobs.

TsukiRyoko
03-27-2009, 11:07 PM
And further, when you say 'right next' to the center of the blast, it's not really clear what you mean by 'right next to'. When nukes are involved, 'close' takes on a whole new meaning. Are we talking a mile? Or meters?
When I say right next to the center, I'm talking about... Let's say, within a few miles of the blast. Say, within 3 miles in diameter from the hypocenter or closer.

Namatu
03-28-2009, 04:29 AM
I'm thinking you might get a bit glow-in-the-darky.

Aschenbach
03-28-2009, 05:56 AM
It might not be exactly what you are looking for but check out the "protect and survive" films on youtube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPFCZv8Dng8&feature=related
This is what the British Government showed us during the cold war. They are somehow poignant, tragic, hilarious, and terrifying.

"After 2 days the danger from fall out will be less. But it can still kill you."

"If a family member dies, wrap them up tightly in plastic or paper. Label the body, and label the wrapping. If they are in the house for more than five days, dig a trench outside and bury them, or cover them with earth."

"Listen to the radio and wait for the emergency services."
...as if there would be any left in the event of nuclear armageddon...

Brrrr...I am glad the cold war is over. I used to have nightmares about this stuff.

C.bronco
03-28-2009, 06:15 AM
The History Channel had a good program on the survivors of Hiroshima a few years ago. That would be a really good source if you can find the documentary.

benbradley
03-28-2009, 07:19 AM
When I say right next to the center, I'm talking about... Let's say, within a few miles of the blast. Say, within 3 miles in diameter from the hypocenter or closer.

Here are two really neat pages:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects_of_nuclear_explosions
The Hirishima and Nagasaki bombs were equivalent to 13 and 21 (respectively) kilotons of TNT (don't worry about tens of thousands of tons of TNT, just remember it's a number to describe how big the blast is). They were detonated about 2,000 feet above the ground, and anyone directly under would probably be killed in (my guess) a couple of seconds due to the heat and radiation. That's a "small" nuke bomb. Others nuke bombs have 100 or 1,000 times that much energy (especially hydrogen bombs), and if dropped on a town like Hiroshima would probably vaporize everone and every building within radius of several miles, and kill most people for many more miles around. The Hroshima and Nagasaki bombs are firecrackers by comparison.

And who would tour a cyrogenic lab? Future customers would want to. And reporters for science magazines, and online science sites such as http://singularityhub.com/.

TsukiRyoko
03-29-2009, 09:16 AM
Big thanks to everyone, your answers have helped me out quite a bit :)