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pohaver
03-13-2009, 02:38 AM
I expect to be done with my non fiction book in about 4 months. I have someone who can edit it thoroughly for about $1500. I am not a writer, so will need heavy editing.

I was thinking about using a print on demand service. I am not in this for money, just personal satisfaction. The subject is youth soccer based on my experiences as a coach, referee and administrator for 18 years.

Should be about 200 pages. It's hard to keep it short, but the editing should help.

Does anyone have any experience or opinions on POD services like: Iuniverse, Mill City Press. I am open for suggestions. Want to keep costs down.

everythinginblak
03-13-2009, 02:51 AM
Everyone here will most definately tell you: DO NOT FOR ANY REASON go with PublishAmerica. You might want to check out that forum to get some info.


I almost went with iUniverse when I was sixteen. Had a couple of contracts from AuthorHouse when I was fourteen. Did not go with either one because a( I didn't feel I was ready to be published b( it did not feel right. Both publishers as of the late have had a few complaints. Might want to do some research on that. I believe iUniverse merged with two other POD publishers as well last year (?). Not sure. Someone who knows for sure could follow up on this.

I suggest going with lulu http://lulu.com (http://lulu.com/) if you want to use a POD publisher. They are very upfront and are very easy to use. The only thing you would pay for with them is printing copies of your book and any other services that they offer that you feel could benefit you. If you want editing services, try getting a beta reader on here who loves to read non-fiction. 1500 dollars is alot of money that could be used for something else. Lulu offers editing services as well-and it doesn't cost that much.

Anyway, as always, before going with any publisher-POD or not-do some heavy research. It comes in handy :D

pohaver
03-13-2009, 02:59 AM
What's a "beta reader"?

M.R.J. Le Blanc
03-13-2009, 03:04 AM
someone who reads your work before it's published. They can look at it more objectively, point any issues like continuity or the like. I second the notion to go with lulu instead. Though I'm not sure I'd put out so much money for editing, it seems like for what you're expecting of your book a little extreme. That's just me though, someone a little more knowledgable might be able to better weigh in on that.

everythinginblak
03-13-2009, 03:04 AM
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=30

Someone who reads your work and gives you insightful feedback. :)

aka eraser
03-13-2009, 03:05 AM
pohaver, I'm going to move this thread to our POD Self-Publishing and E Publishing forum.

A beta reader is someone who'll read your ms and tell you what they think of it, not necessarily what you want to hear.

pohaver
03-13-2009, 03:22 AM
Is there are fee for a beta reader.

pohaver
03-13-2009, 03:27 AM
I have seen a lot of recommendations for Lulu for POD. I will check it. I was looking at Mill City Press. I need someone to do my cover, and get it formatted correctly. I do not know anything about format. I am using MSWord right now. Mill City also will give you a website free for one year to market your book.

pohaver
03-13-2009, 04:04 AM
As I mentioned above, I am writing a non fiction book on youth soccer. It will be about 200 pages. Not being a writer or anything close, I will need it edited and maybe restructured for better reading. It will need a lot of work before it is ready for print. Content is no problem, it is based on my experiences, so that is easy. My target audience is new soccer parents and new coaches.

I have read about the pros and cons of POD. I don't know what my options are to get it into print and out to market. Don't want to use traditional printing, and buy a lot of books up front. Just want to get it into print. Making money is not the goal. Don't want to spend more that about $2000 to get it done.

Is POD the way I should go with their in-house editing, or should I do this all another way? LuLu looks OK, so does Iuniverse and Mill City Press. Mill City Press will give me a website too to help market the book.

Any advice is helpful. I expect to have the first draft done by late summer.

everythinginblak
03-13-2009, 04:07 AM
Is there are fee for a beta reader.

See, that's the best part about AW: All of the advice is free! There is no charge for a beta readr. :)

Lulu gives you your own storefront with a biography about you, contact info, and all your books that you have published. If you want a website, you can easily set one up with tripod or freewebs.com

When looking into POD-you usually pay an up front fee before they 'publish' your book. iUniverse falls into that category. Lulu does not ask for an upfront fee. As I have said, the only thing you will pay for from them is: Purchasing your books and any services that they may offer if you feel that you may need them. You set your own book price with lulu, by the way. They have a FAQ section that you should check out :)

Nandi
03-13-2009, 04:45 AM
Pohaver, I have examined a number of POD services, and I still seem to like Mill City the best. Their basic package, not the deluxe one. Unless I receive a favorable response soon from one of the agents or publishers I have queried (and I have queried a lot of them!), I'll probably be using Mill City.

MickRooney
03-13-2009, 03:14 PM
Pohaver,

Consider first that POD is not necessarily the ideal publishing platform for a fiction book. You need to consider what kind of people might be interested in reading your book and how best to reach them. This is the biggest challenge with POD services. Most simply provide you with a book which is available to order on line and few POD services manage to get physical book store space.

When you go the POD route, you must accept that virtually all the marketing and sales will be on your shoulders.

ResearchGuy
03-13-2009, 11:20 PM
. . .Lulu does not ask for an upfront fee. . . .
However Lulu does now offer paid publication, at various prices, making it also a subsidy publisher. I suppose it was a business necessity, but it was still disappointing to see Lulu move in that direction. I am reasonably confident that Lulu still avoids deception about its products and services, though.

One can still use Lulu simply as a book printer, with the only cost being for books ordered. The user is not obligated to buy Lulu's cover design or other services.

--Ken

ResearchGuy
03-13-2009, 11:33 PM
. . .I am not in this for money, just personal satisfaction. . . .
POD is the right way to go for something like that. Never heard of Mill City Press, but iUniverse is a bit pricey now. Lulu is a fine choice IF you can do the book design and formatting yourself, or have it done for you. Few can. (I use Lulu, but I do the design work, interior, cover, and all.) Lulu can provide decent basic covers that require no expertise and no cost. But it still takes some experimentation to get the right look. Laying out the interior is the hard part, as you have to upload a fully formatted file, one that looks precisely the way you want it to (page size, font(s), spacing, headers, footers, headings, table of contents, page numbering, copyright info, title page, etc.).

Shop around to compare options and prices. I've produced books via Lulu that cost nothing but my own time and the printing costs of any copies I have chosen to order. But I do this stuff as a business and learned the techniques over many years.

--Ken

Another
03-19-2009, 03:19 AM
Pohaver,

Consider first that POD is not necessarily the ideal publishing platform for a fiction book ... Most simply provide you with a book which is available to order on line and few POD services manage to get physical book store space.

Any PODs come to mind which do get book store space?

Another

MickRooney
03-19-2009, 09:12 PM
Any PODs come to mind which do get book store space?

Another

In generally, it is not a question of which POD service to use, but rather, the efforts of the author themselves to approach local bookstores with a view to taking copies of their book.

Most booksellers will not stock Print on demand titles because they are not offered returnable books or a high enough discount from the POD publishers/wholesaler. The few POD publishers who do offer returnability, charge this at an additional fee to the author (several hundred dollars sometimes).

Off the top of my head, and you would need to check, Virtual Bookworm used to offer this service, and possibly Mill City Press. Personally, I think the returnability of a POD title goes against the whole initial principle of digital print on demand (printed to order).

Nandi
03-19-2009, 09:21 PM
If your primary interest is placing books locally, I know that where I live it is possible to talk, in person, with bookstore managers who are willing to place a couple of copies of a self-published, POD book on their shelves and sell it on consignment, splitting the revenue with the author. This is true for the so-called big box stores (B&N and Borders), as well as smaller, independent bookstores. Placing these nationally, though, is a whole other thing.

cpickett
03-21-2009, 12:16 AM
Hi Paul,
With regard to your question about getting on store shelves, what's been mentioned so far is correct. If you do not have big name status or a distribution company with sales representation, shelf-space is hard to come by, particularly for a first time author. Most of the packages POD publishers offer make your book available to be ordered through major outlets, but that's along with the other 200K that are out there as well. Few offer serious help in marketing (printing postcards and bookmarks does not count).

As far as Mill City, they are owned by someone who's done a comparison of fee-based/partner-publishing/POD companies and who believes they offer something very different but it's really not terribly different from others. It is on the expensive side of the equation. The book is The Fine Print by Mark Levine and many people have found it useful.

You can also find a similar comparison list at http://www.dehanna.com Look at the services you need, and while cost up front is important, it is also extremely important to understand per unit cost. If your book is $5 or $6 to print, and you do want to sell even a few copies, it will be tough to put a paperback price on it of $13, sell through Amazon etc. and make any money. Even if you intend to give them away, I would imagine you'd like your print cost to be as affordable as possible.

There is a lot to learn about the book publishing process. Glad you are taking steps to educate yourself as much as possible. Keep at it, don't make any major decisions until you feel confident and well-informed.