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View Full Version : [Agency] D.C. Jacobson & Associates, LLC



Leigh86
03-12-2009, 07:26 AM
I looked and couldn't find athread on here for them, so I guess I'll start it. They're a strictly Christian agency and they have a pretty impressive looking website and according to it, he used to work at Multnomah. From what I can tell, they must be relatively new.
Anyway, I'm wondering if anybody has any extra info about them besides what's on their website. Thanks so much!

M.R.J. Le Blanc
03-12-2009, 10:41 AM
Adding link: http://www.dcjacobson.com/

CaoPaux
03-16-2009, 08:20 PM
He has a couple clients published by David C. Cook (the first in 2007). I'm not sure what "published in association with D.C. Jacobson" means, though.

Leigh86
04-02-2009, 04:58 AM
Well, I heard back from them today. They said my novel sounded "intriguing" and that they wanted to see more. So that's good news!

cswayden
05-01-2009, 10:21 AM
I have a Christian novel and I found D.C. Jacobson. Through their website I quiered them and they asked for a partial. I was elated. I got an email back from them declining but...and here's where I need some help. Though they declined they did say that they offer a wonderful consulting service. Here is some of what they wrote me:

"However, we do see potential in this project and would like to help you achieve your publishing goals. You may want to consider DCJA’s unique consulting services; our purpose is to guide aspiring authors (who we believe in) to maximize their project’s potential. Our team of publishing professionals works together, combining 30+ years of industry experience, to perform in-depth evaluations of your work and give you access to some of the same personalized coaching our contracted authors receive.

Note: The DCJA consulting packages are a high-value, low-risk investment in your writing career. By the end of our process, you will have a tighter book concept, a professionally prepared proposal, and the tools necessary for you to land an agent or publisher (or to go the self-publishing route if you choose). And if by the end of the process, DCJA decides to represent you, we will reimburse your consulting fees."

To me this seems a little odd. Does anyone else think this way? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

M.R.J. Le Blanc
05-01-2009, 04:41 PM
It's more than odd - it's a conflict of interest. If they get money from you via this package, they have zero incentive to actually rep you and sell your book. Real agents make their living on that 15% commission, so you better believe they're going to bust their butt to sell your work. Someone like this, no incentive. They may manage to sell books, but I wouldn't be surprised if other agents have then beat in number of books sold.

Don't bother with these guys. Everything they're offering to help you with through that package you can learn how to do here, at AW - for free. Stick with someone with track records. You can look up agents on www.agentquery.com to start.

Juneluv12
05-01-2009, 04:53 PM
Fabulous! I have a YA partial out with them right now. I've got partials and fulls out with Christian and Secular agents. I also have a adult novel I wanted to send as well.

Argh, this really makes me mad!

CaoPaux
05-01-2009, 06:41 PM
Well, that certainly reveals what "published in association with" means. Bleah.

Leigh86
05-02-2009, 01:36 AM
Yeah, I have a partial out with them right now. While I'm disappointed about hearing this, I'm NOT surprised. The second time I looked at their website, I saw the "consultation" thing.
Umm...Isn't that EXACTLY what a literary agent is supposed to do as a part of your contract? And last time I checked, that's what the 15% is supposed to be for.
And I agree, Juneluv12, it's frustrating and sad to see how many of these "Christian" agencies are doing stuff like this.
Oh, well. Moving on to somebody else!

cswayden
05-02-2009, 05:46 AM
Thanks Le Blanc for the advice. I thought it was a little strange. Makes me mad really. And you're right, you can find the advice right here, for free. "Yeah let me see a partial, yeah get my hopes up that maybe, just maybe this might be the time I get an agent, yeah pay a lot of money for us to...blah, blah, blah."

At least the lesson was learned before money was sent. Thanks.

Leigh86
05-02-2009, 06:17 AM
Big thank you from me too! I spent 20 min. or so pouting and now I've moved on. I've been doing this just long enough to know that to be in this business, you need to have thick skin, so I guess I'll just keep on trucking!
Nothing ventured, nothing gained. BIG hugs all around!

Juneluv12
05-02-2009, 05:51 PM
I'm almost tempted to send an email for clarifcation. I've heard of people withdrawing their manuscripts for consideration, and I wouldn't hesitate to do this. I've got to recheck my dates. She said she would be back to me within 2-4 weeks. I'm thinking I'm inbetween the 2-4 week mark.

cswayden
05-03-2009, 12:42 AM
I'd be very curious as to what they say. I'm wondering if the email they sent me was just their form letter to try to draw people in to take advantage of their consulting services or maybe it was just for my manuscript. Maybe they'll offer you a contract right away. Let us know how it turns out.

M.R.J. Le Blanc
05-03-2009, 07:01 AM
Their site is pretty clear. The man who started the agency has a 'publishing career', which I'm guessing means he's had books published. Fine, great. But that's no qualifying experience to be an agent. There's also a lot of misinformation i.e. agents disappearing after the contract, new authors having a hard time finding success. And the additional services is a HUGE flag. It questions their incentive to sell books if they're making money on the side. And any agency who is dependant on something like this I would question their ability to sell books. There's plenty of good agencies out there making their money on selling books, and nothing more. Those are the agents you should be focusing on.

Juneluv12
05-05-2009, 10:57 PM
Mr. Jacobson was kind enough to promptly reply back to my question about his agency. He said it was okay to share my response with others here on the board, so here it is.

I read through the message board and was fascinated to read M.R.J. LeBlanc’s post: “Their site is pretty clear. The man who started the agency has a 'publishing career', which I'm guessing means he's had books published. Fine, great. But that's no qualifying experience to be an agent.” If he had read our website or done a bit of research, he would have seen that I was actually the owner and publisher of Multnomah Publishers for fourteen years and helped authors like Dobson, Blackaby, Alcorn, Piper, Feldhahn, Gunn, Kingsbury, and Rivers produce bestselling, life-changing books. After selling Multnomah to Random House in 2006, I started this agency, focusing on deep relationships with very few authors with whom my colleagues and I have a high capacity for friendship and shared vision. We invest a significant amount of time in our contracted authors and of course do not charge them for any of our services, just the standard 15% commission.

Our Consulting Services were born out of a demand from unrepresented authors for publishing coaching. We receive several submissions and queries each day, and have done our best to share helpful tips with authors we can’t represent, instead of just sending a typical nondescript “pass” email. But, what we’ve found the past two years is that every time we respond to someone with a few insights, they come back with more questions, wanting more advice on how to improve their proposals and book concepts. Unfortunately, we can’t invest the time into an in-depth response to every one of the hundreds of submissions we receive, as our foremost responsibility is servicing our represented authors. We began offering Consulting Services this spring out of a desire to help unrepresented authors whose book ideas legitimately have potential but aren’t at the level we would represent or is likely to be picked up by another reputable agent or publisher. Our team spends several hours providing in-depth feedback and suggestions and charges a rate that’s fair for the level of service we provide.

There is no conflict of interest because we don’t charge any fees from the authors we represent and if we consult with an author who we end up signing down the road, their consulting fees would be fully refunded. Our heart is to continue working closely with a few represented authors and to also lend our experience and insights to consulting clients we think will most benefit from our services.

I hope this response helps clarify our intention. Please feel free to share this info with your associates on the AW site and encourage them to become more familiar with our site if they’re interested in learning about us.

CaoPaux
05-06-2009, 12:05 AM
Hmm. Any mention of clients or sales?

M.R.J. Le Blanc
05-06-2009, 05:05 PM
Well I'm a she, not a he (since he indicated he was reading this board :) ).


If he had read our website or done a bit of research, he would have seen that I was actually the owner and publisher of Multnomah Publishers for fourteen years and helped authors like Dobson, Blackaby, Alcorn, Piper, Feldhahn, Gunn, Kingsbury, and Rivers produce bestselling, life-changing books. After selling Multnomah to Random House in 2006, I started this agency, focusing on deep relationships with very few authors with whom my colleagues and I have a high capacity for friendship and shared vision. We invest a significant amount of time in our contracted authors and of course do not charge them for any of our services, just the standard 15% commission.

I don't recall seeing that, but it's completely possible I missed it. I think it would have been appropriate to put it in the about us/The DCJA Story section, since that's usually the first place people go. It's where I went, anyway, and with the title of that section expected to hear more about how DCJA came about, and not just what they do. Just an observation.


Our Consulting Services were born out of a demand from unrepresented authors for publishing coaching. We receive several submissions and queries each day, and have done our best to share helpful tips with authors we can’t represent, instead of just sending a typical nondescript “pass” email. But, what we’ve found the past two years is that every time we respond to someone with a few insights, they come back with more questions, wanting more advice on how to improve their proposals and book concepts. Unfortunately, we can’t invest the time into an in-depth response to every one of the hundreds of submissions we receive, as our foremost responsibility is servicing our represented authors. We began offering Consulting Services this spring out of a desire to help unrepresented authors whose book ideas legitimately have potential but aren’t at the level we would represent or is likely to be picked up by another reputable agent or publisher. Our team spends several hours providing in-depth feedback and suggestions and charges a rate that’s fair for the level of service we provide.

There is no conflict of interest because we don’t charge any fees from the authors we represent and if we consult with an author who we end up signing down the road, their consulting fees would be fully refunded. Our heart is to continue working closely with a few represented authors and to also lend our experience and insights to consulting clients we think will most benefit from our services.

But see, this still is a conflict of interest. One, because it's very easy for this to get abused and two it gets into really murky territory. At the very least, it's guilt by association because there are many agencies out there who do do this and not to anyone's benefit but their own. Plus, this hints to me that the agency cannot support itself on sales alone, and relies on the income generated from consulting services in order to run. Not a good sign. I can understand the desire to help the authors being rejected, but there's a reason other agencies don't do this. It's because they simply don't have time - they're working with their own clients and selling books. Would they, if they did have the time? I'm sure many would. But it's not a reality. And the fact that your agency spends so much time helping authors you've felt the need to offer a consulting service to compensate your time (which in that respect I can't fault you for wanting to be compensated for your time) it's time taken away from selling your clients' books. Successful agents agent as a full-time job, not as a part-time job or in conjunction with something else.

I have no problems with consulting services, as long as they're fair and really offer what they advertise. But an agency who runs one in conjunction with their agenting does not inspire much confidence at all. As a writer, I want to know you can sell my book - knowing you're spending a significant amount of time with a consulting service would make me wonder just what kind of effort my work is getting. I'm sure you're probably with the best of intentions, but as I've stated there's a reason agents don't do this and why it is not offered.

ChristineR
05-06-2009, 05:27 PM
They offered consulting services to someone they declined, which is a huge red flag. The implication is that they might accept him--and refund the money--if he buys the consults. This person apparently had no thought of getting consulting services before the submission.

Also, (and I feel like a heel for saying this) the fact that they call themselves Christian is another red flag. There's nothing wrong with only agenting Christian books, but the implication is that they are more trustworthy than other agencies with conflicts of interest because they are Christians. But scammers are smart enough to realize that sticking that label on yourself is more likely to make vulnerable writers overlook suspicious offers of consulting services.

heidi willis
05-09-2009, 01:59 AM
This is my first post here, so I'm a bit nervous diving into the waters, but I'm not new to writing and agent hunting, or researching, so I'm going to put in my two cents anyway.

Firstly, I think spending any amount of time in this business can make us all cynical. There are so many things to watch out for, so many scammers ready to make a buck off our hopes and dreams... it's so easy to lump everyone together.

I did extensive research on DCJA before submitting to them. I was worried initially that there is so little about them on the internet. But what I have found about Don Jacobson as a person has made me more than comfortable.

If you google his name you will find out a lot about his history... the fact that he started, owned and sold Multonomah Press, and treated it as a ministry. He OWNED one of the largest Christian publishers! He went on to build a coffee growing business, also as a ministry and mission. He doesn't need an agency for income. He has money enough to not have to do this kind of business. But he does it because books are his passion, and because he truly wants to use his life to glorify God. He has some deep ties in the Christian community. I think his reputation as a person and a businessman were more than enough to make me trust his agency.

I don't think anywhere he says on the website that he is more trustworthy because they are Christian. It is, however, important to know they only rep Christian books because that cuts down on getting submissions they don't want. That saves both their time and the author's.

As for authors they've repped, the list is impressive. Some authors with very established careers started with him, which he listed above in his answer. Not all of them are with him now... perhaps because he stopped working in publishing for a few years and they moved on, and now he's back but they have other reps? That would be a question I'd ask. He has, however, made some very big deals in the past.

I submitted a query to them two months ago and got a very nice, personal and encouraging reply asking for a partial and synopsis. Recently I received a very nice and personal reply asking for my full.

I don't know what the end result will be. If they offer their consulting services, I will politely decline. But my interactions with them so far don't indicate that it is anything other than a way they've tried to help struggling authors who don't research on the internet or take writing classes or have the foggiest idea of where to begin.

If they call and I get the chance to speak with them, or by grace work with them, I'll come back and let you know what I find out.

Leigh86
05-16-2009, 06:33 AM
Just received an email declining representation for me, but they OF COURSE offered their consultation packages. Thanks, but no thanks. Oh, well. Moving on.

starlight
06-30-2009, 05:51 PM
I recently queried D.C. Jacobson and assoctiates about a novel and recieved a reply back asking for a complete book proposal with several sample chapters if available. I am prepared to send a synopsis, partial, full, whatever, but not a book proposal. Since when do people ask for book proposals on a completed work of fiction? Maybe I'm just being ignorant, but I really don't know what they are looking. Advice anyone?

waylander
06-30-2009, 06:21 PM
Sounds like a response appropriate to a non-fiction submission.
E-mail them back and ask for clarification

starlight
06-30-2009, 06:33 PM
Yeah, I think I'll do that. Thanks. Or maybe I'll just remind them my manuscript is fiction and send them the synopsis and first three chapters. After reading all the post on here, I'll admit, I'm not really expecting much. Probably they just want to consult for me.

Juneluv12
06-30-2009, 06:37 PM
Yeah, I think I'll do that. Thanks. Or maybe I'll just remind them my manuscript is fiction and send them the synopsis and first three chapters. After reading all the post on here, I'll admit, I'm not really expecting much. Probably they just want to consult for me.

I'd actually emailed Victoria just a week or two about them detailing my experience.

I initially gave them the benefit of the doubt after emailing for clarification on the "consulting" part. Then I got back a rejection on my partial for my YA. They outlined some pretty minimal things that were "wrong" with the book. I asked for the chance to revise and to submit a proposal for my adult novel. She said yes.

Then a few weeks later they came back with this....that they felt my novels were two secular(never mentioned this with the YA in the suggestions), and that they mainly handled non-fiction(never mentioned this before).

I would seriously consider this before taking the time to do a proposal. I hate to say it, but i really think their business is sham!

Leigh86
07-29-2009, 06:08 AM
I got another email from them the other day reminding me of their consulting services. They also wanted to see if I was still pursuing a career in writing.
And they said, AGAIN, that they were "intrigued" with my novel. Well, if they were so intrigued, then why did I get a rejection from them in the first place?
I don't really understand this so called Agency.

dundermiffflin
01-13-2011, 08:10 PM
Is the consensus still negative about DC Jacobson? I understand the points made about offering services for a fee after rejecting your pitch. I did notice Francis Chan is with them. Crazy Love has sold one million plus copies. They must be doing something right?

Jamiekswriter
01-13-2011, 08:25 PM
It all depends. How much did Francis Chan pay D.C Jacobsen, if anything? Is Chan's publisher David C. Cook, the same D.C. as in D.C. Jacobsen & Associates? Did Chan get an advance with David C. Cook for "Crazy Love"?

dundermiffflin
01-13-2011, 08:36 PM
It all depends. How much did Francis Chan pay D.C Jacobsen, if anything? Is Chan's publisher David C. Cook, the same D.C. as in D.C. Jacobsen & Associates? Did Chan get an advance with David C. Cook for "Crazy Love"?

Yeah I am not sure of any of the details? Are you implying they should not be trusted? If so, do you have a good alternative agent to pitch to? (Christian Non-Fiction) Thanks!

dundermiffflin
01-13-2011, 08:40 PM
I did find this link:

http://www.davidccook.com/About/news/index.cfm?N=7,169,1,3

Jamiekswriter
01-13-2011, 08:50 PM
Nope, not implying anything. Not my genre so I'm not the best person to ask. You might want to try querytracker.net and search for agents using "Christian" as a source and double check with agentquery.com on what they're looking for. Also you may want to see if David Cook accepts unsoliciatated manuscripts. That way you could just submit to them yourself.

If you do decide to go with D.C. Jacobson, please don't give them any money. That's not the way the author/agent process works. The agent gets paid when you do. Usually they take 15% of what the publisher pays you. An agent that believes in your work will edit you as part of that 15%.

Good luck!

dundermiffflin
01-21-2011, 11:35 PM
Ok thanks for the tips.


Nope, not implying anything. Not my genre so I'm not the best person to ask. You might want to try querytracker.net and search for agents using "Christian" as a source and double check with agentquery.com on what they're looking for. Also you may want to see if David Cook accepts unsoliciatated manuscripts. That way you could just submit to them yourself.

If you do decide to go with D.C. Jacobson, please don't give them any money. That's not the way the author/agent process works. The agent gets paid when you do. Usually they take 15% of what the publisher pays you. An agent that believes in your work will edit you as part of that 15%.

Good luck!

CAWriter
01-24-2011, 10:56 AM
Yeah I am not sure of any of the details? Are you implying they should not be trusted? If so, do you have a good alternative agent to pitch to? (Christian Non-Fiction) Thanks!

David C Cook is a long-established Christian publisher, not at all related to DC Jacobsen. A friend of mine was with Jacobsen for her first book. They didn't agree on her career path after that so she went elsewhere, but they do get legitimate deals.

There are a large number of other agents to query with Christian non-fiction. WordServe Literary, Books and Such (each has multiple agents you'd want to look at to see who would be the best match for you).

You might want to get a copy of The Christian Writer's Market Guide by Sally Stuart. It will be the best source of information in one location that you can get. The new edition just came out.

dundermiffflin
01-24-2011, 08:28 PM
Great thank you.


David C Cook is a long-established Christian publisher, not at all related to DC Jacobsen. A friend of mine was with Jacobsen for her first book. They didn't agree on her career path after that so she went elsewhere, but they do get legitimate deals.

There are a large number of other agents to query with Christian non-fiction. WordServe Literary, Books and Such (each has multiple agents you'd want to look at to see who would be the best match for you).

You might want to get a copy of The Christian Writer's Market Guide by Sally Stuart. It will be the best source of information in one location that you can get. The new edition just came out.