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View Full Version : An endless night of the demon baby. . . What was wrong with her?



underthecity
03-08-2009, 06:14 PM
We've been breast feeding our newborn and supplementing it with formula. The breast feeding was lasting only about five minutes per side because the milk hasn't all come in yet. Baby Alayna is now four days old.

Last night things were pretty normal, she last fed after 9 but kept rooting around and kept fussing. We gave her 10 mL of formula in a syringe. More fussing, more rooting. She started crying. And screaming. Wife's nipples are sore, gave her more formula. More crying, more screaming. Let her nurse. More crying, more screaming and fussing.

This, btw, was going on over a period of at least two hours. We had to keep holding her, she kept wiggling and kicking and refused to lie down. Mommy and Daddy were exhausted.

Saturday Night Live comes on. Wife is holding her, nursing her. She appears calm but when I try to lay her down in the bassinet, she wiggles and kicks and cries and screams and screams. And I mean the ear-splitting scream. The neighbors must have thought we were abusing her.

Wife takes her back and hold her, before long she's nursing again. Finally baby sleeps but wife has to sit in bed and hold her. This lasts for one hour. Then it's more screaming. And screaming. And more nursing, but I can't remember. I think I gave her more formula because all night while she's been crying, she's been sucking on her fist and rooting. So, she must be hungry, right? Right?

At 3 a.m. she nurses again and wife has to hold her as she falls back asleep. Will she stay asleep? We had no idea.

Sometime after that, my wife had to use the toilet and set Alayna back into the bassinet. Baby stayed put, no more crying.

Then around 8, my wife wakes me up and says she is nursing again. Baby was awake, but was only fussing mildly asking for breakfast.

Baby had slept for five hours straight, a new record.

Now baby Alayna is fine. She nursed for over fifteen minutes each side, I changed her diaper, she is sleeping in her bassinet because apparently the demon has left her. My wife pumped one breast and got one ounce.

Those are all the highlights, and I'm not sure I got all the details right because the whole night's a blur. In a nutshell, baby screaming nonstop, fed formula and breastmilk, kept screaming all night. And she ate a lot. Now ahe's fine.

So, what in the world was going on? Any mothers want to take a crack? Was it really a demon? And if this happens again, what do we do?

(BTW, otherwise, everything's great and we love her to death.)

Clair Dickson
03-08-2009, 06:30 PM
My brother had a night like that with his baby... he finally figured out that the kid was cold. Soon as he wrapped the baby up in a thick blanket and put a hat on, the baby was fine.

Don't know if that's what happened with yours. Could have been a tummy ache, too.

Have fun! ;-)

firedrake
03-08-2009, 06:30 PM
Ah, you have my sympathy.
When my lad was born I tried breastfeeding but I just wasn't producing enough. As a consequence my nipples were in shreds.
We were lucky, we lived in England at the time and so we could phone the maternity unit at 3.00 in the morning and get advice.
Their advice was to switch entirely over to formula. It worked like a charm because we knew how much Nat was getting.
Did you burp Alayna after she fed? She could have indigestion. You should really get her to burp before you lay her back down again.

underthecity
03-08-2009, 06:59 PM
It was a warm night and the room was warm. She was wearing a sleeper and was usually swaddled, but she kept kicking it off. I don't want to overheat her.

We're thinking too that it was excessive gas, but just don't know for sure. We did keep burping her throughout the feedings and got her to burp, but perhaps she had gas that hadn't come out. Don't know.

Perks
03-08-2009, 07:02 PM
Well, her liver is immature. The medicines your wife received in the hospital take several days to clear the baby's system. She could have had a hangover. You'll have a few days and nights like this for the next several weeks.

Devil Ledbetter
03-08-2009, 07:06 PM
Ah, you have my sympathy.
When my lad was born I tried breastfeeding but I just wasn't producing enough. As a consequence my nipples were in shreds.
We were lucky, we lived in England at the time and so we could phone the maternity unit at 3.00 in the morning and get advice.
Their advice was to switch entirely over to formula. It worked like a charm because we knew how much Nat was getting.
You've got it backwards. It's not low milk supply that leads to shredded nipples. Nipples in shreds are a sure sign the baby isn't properly latched on - usually because it's sucking at the nipple rather than fully latched at the breast. An improperly latched baby will not get enough milk, which in turn causes a reduction in milk supply. The more the baby nurses, the more milk you make, and vice versa. This is why it's possible to nurse twins and even triplets, and why formula feeding causes reduction in milk supply.

It's very easy to tell if a breastfed baby is getting enough milk. Just count diapers. Five or six wet diapers and a couple of poopies in 24 hours is plenty for a newborn. It's actually a more accurate measure than looking at empty bottles because the empty bottle never accounts for how much the baby spits up.

Babies typically go through milk demand spurts at a few days (5 is typical), around 3 weeks, 6 weeks, etc. This is where they seems "never satisfied" and demand to nurse "all day" for 24 -48 hours. In this way, they force an increase in milk supply - unless they are given formula at these times. When this happens, the mother's milk supply doesn't increase, baby never seems satisfied at the breast and mom decides she "can't" make enough milk.

Underthecity, please, please, please have your wife contact your local La Leche League leader (http://www.lllusa.org/groups.php). These volunteers help new mothers with breastfeeding and are wonderfully supportive. I was an LLL leader for 5 years. (Yep, despite my avatar I am female.)

The first few days of breastfeeding are usually the hardest. The absolute best thing for increasing milk production is to just get in bed with baby, rest and relax and let her nurse, nurse, nurse. Milk is made when mom is at rest. Stress inhibits milk production and the let-down reflex. What you can do for your wife is take care of everything else (diapers, laundry, meals, visitors, shopping, errands) so she can relax and nurse while she and baby get the hang of it.

Best of luck to you!

Soccer Mom
03-08-2009, 07:18 PM
Yes, the first couple of days breastfeeding can be rough. Check the diapers, as DL said. Five to six mean she's getting enough.

The thing is to be patient. The other thing is not to obsess over it. Occasionally a mother isn't able to produce enough. That happened to me with one of my children. Don't let your wife make herself miserable over it if that happens.

I heartily agree to bringing a helper from the La Leche League. They can help set your mind at ease. I had to do that and she was able to help with one who had trouble latching. It's a nipple-saver. Trust me on this.

Some nights are just rough and there never is a good answer. Some babies are gassy and colicky. Some have a "fussy" period of the day. Just hang in there and don't feel guilty about snatching sleep whenever you can. Naps can keep you from losing your mind.

Thump
03-08-2009, 07:33 PM
Don't have a baby myself but I remember when my youngest sister was a newborn. I was five and insisted on being responsible and helping mom out with the kid (including waking up at night to help with the feedings - I was such a cute kid, if I may say so myself :p ). Sometimes my sister would be impossible and freak my parents out.

Eventually we figured out that sometimes she had gas or a tummy ache, and this one time there was a tag in her jammies that hurt her back when she was lying down, and the only way she was comfortable was being held. Mom couldn't breastfeed but being in that position is instinctively comforting, especially with a nipple in the mouth even if they aren't actually nursing (much). At least, that's my reckoning :D
Or maybe baby Alayna just needed comfort for no particular reason. That happens too I hear.

Perks
03-08-2009, 07:38 PM
Babies typically go through milk demand spurts at a few days (5 is typical), around 3 weeks, 6 weeks, etc. This is where they seems "never satisfied" and demand to nurse "all day" for 24 -48 hours. In this way, they force an increase in milk supply - unless they are given formula at these times. When this happens, the mother's milk supply doesn't increase, baby never seems satisfied at the breast and mom decides she "can't" make enough milk.

Underthecity, please, please, please have your wife contact your local La Leche League leader (http://www.lllusa.org/groups.php). These volunteers help new mothers with breastfeeding and are wonderfully supportive. I was an LLL leader for 5 years. (Yep, despite my avatar I am female.)

The first few days of breastfeeding are usually the hardest. The absolute best thing for increasing milk production is to just get in bed with baby, rest and relax and let her nurse, nurse, nurse. Milk is made when mom is at rest. Stress inhibits milk production and the let-down reflex. What you can do for your wife is take care of everything else (diapers, laundry, meals, visitors, shopping, errands) so she can relax and nurse while she and baby get the hang of it.

Best of luck to you!
Ah yes! Such great advice. Gauging by ounces of formula down the hatch is very misleading. Did you know a newborn's stomach is the size of a cherry? You can't put ounces and ounces in. A tiny bit is 'enough'.

She will seem to be nursing almost constantly, and that's good, if a little counter to those gurgly, contented six month olds they show on formula commercials.

Do call La Leche League. They are wonderful and will halve your frustrations in the first phonecall.

Wayne K
03-08-2009, 08:29 PM
She's a demon. As soon as the new baby smell wears off either get her a job or sell her to gypsies. I'll take her if you want. If you meet the family first you'll know she's in experienced hands. Hell, you can just meet my mom...

lostgirl
03-08-2009, 08:41 PM
My baby had an underdeveloped stomach and would scream constantly... I couldn't breastfeed. never made milk (freak of nature is what I am.. :D ) but the only formula the kid could drink was the caviar of formula -- Alimentum (something like that) and as soon as we found the formula he was a completely different baby.. I'd be up all night holding him as he screamed. Boy I thought I'd never survive it.

but we tried every thing.. hang in there.. could've just been a touch of colic too.

underthecity
03-08-2009, 08:57 PM
Thanks for the nudge about La Leche. My mom had told her about La Leche a long time ago (turns out LL was around when I was a baby). But my wife kind of disregarded the advice, I think because my wife hates to "reach out" for support groups. For instance, she never visits message boards for anything, even though there was a great one for expectant mothers. She has no interest in MBs at all. As you can see, I love them myself.

But they mentioned LL at the hospital, and someone else here at AW has told me about it, and Devil Ledbetter above has suggested it, and a few minutes ago I brought it up to her, and she seemed interested, so tomorrow we'll contact our local LL and see what they say.

rhymegirl
03-08-2009, 09:00 PM
I think she just had gas.

To me, the combination of breast milk and formula, maybe not a good idea. I think they can tolerate breast milk much better. But some moms do have trouble achieving enough milk flow. I'd pick one or the other.

jubileerocker
03-08-2009, 09:05 PM
Welcome to parenthood and the daily puzzle of why is my baby crying now!

Were her clothes bothering her? Do you have a swing or something that vibrates or plays music? We love SNL in this house so thats always a plus for us

Devil Ledbetter
03-08-2009, 09:16 PM
I think she just had gas.

To me, the combination of breast milk and formula, maybe not a good idea. I think they can tolerate breast milk much better. But some moms do have trouble achieving enough milk flow. I'd pick one or the other.Breastmilk is better tolerated than formula, but it's not an either/or proposition. There is no medical reason to abruptly wean when giving formula - although giving formula often leads to unintentional weaning.

The baby getting formula and some breastmilk is better off than the baby getting no breastmilk at all.

jubileerocker
03-08-2009, 09:23 PM
As heart braking as it is also you might have to give up breast formula. I couldn't I delivered too early and wasn't producing like I needed to for my child. It sounds like that's all the baby wants and she's not getting enough. If you move her completely to formula she will forget about breast milk

Haggis
03-08-2009, 09:26 PM
The good news is that you'll live through this.

The bad news is that someday soon, she'll be asking you for the car keys. :(

Devil Ledbetter
03-08-2009, 09:32 PM
As heart braking as it is also you might have to give up breast formula. I couldn't I delivered too early and wasn't producing like I needed to for my child. It sounds like that's all the baby wants and she's not getting enough. If you move her completely to formula she will forget about breast milk
I understand that some people can't breastfeed for whatever reason, and I don't judge. But advising others to ditch breastfeeding at the first hint of difficulty is irresponsible. You have no idea whether his baby is "getting enough," and crying isn't necessarily any indication that she isn't. Babies cry for reasons other than hunger. Furthermore, if she is hungry, it's more breastfeeding that will bring her mother's milk supply up to speed - giving formula will do the exact opposite.

Yes, if they "move her completely to formula" she'll indeed "forget about breastmilk." And they can also forget about the many, well-documented health (and budgetary) advantages breastfeeding offers.

Also, there is no such thing as "breast formula."

Carole
03-08-2009, 09:36 PM
All this is normal--as everyone mentions above. With my first son, it was a non-stop screaming fest for three months straight. It was very trying and emotionally draining, but he was fine. There's hardly anything more difficult to go through than a baby who is clearly unhappy but mommy and daddy can't fix it. Patience is key. Babies pick up on your anxiety and it will make them even more restless.

Patience. :) This will pass. I promise it's not forever.

When Daniel was going through it, all anyone ever told me was that it was colic. Colic--the mysterious ailment. My deductions told me that it was an immature digestive system. He had painful gas, and his little body simply wasn't used to processing milk yet. They are having a constant stream of brand new sensations and it seems to be overwhelming for them sometimes. Eating is new, food in the body is new, gas is new and pain (hunger or digestion issues) is definitely new. Before birth, they're just floating around all peaceful like and then out of the blue they are bombarded with all this new stuff. Swaddling is great. It keeps them feeling secure and warm.

All I can say is patience. That, and make sure you and mommy give each other plenty of time away from baby to recover emotionally from the crying jags. It's hard at first, but it will pass.

If it's really breastfeeding issues, there is nothing wrong with not being able to breastfeed. And sometimes it takes babies a little while to get the hang of it. If it just doesn't work, then give her a bottle and be happy that she is eating. Again--there is absolutely nothing wrong with bottle feeding. Baby won't suffer for it. Let me say that again--Baby will not suffer from formula. Millions of babies have been bottle fed with formula, and they did just fine. Breastfeeding is wonderful, sure. But do not let anyone make you or your wife feel "less than" if it's not possible. My mother wasn't able to breastfeed. I did, but only for three months with each of my boys. I gained well and developed exactly like I was supposed to on formula. My boys gained well and developed exactly like they were supposed to on formula. Breast or bottle, it's really not a life-altering decision for baby.

Also, has anyone mentioned that mommy might get what they call the blues? Right now, it's just about time for them to start. Her hormones will be all wonky for a while, so don't be surprised if she starts weeping when all you said to her was, "Have you seen the TV remote?" :)

Rarri
03-08-2009, 09:55 PM
Four days old is still really little, the first six weeks of breastfeeding are turbulent at the best of times. Don't fret about mixed feeding, if your wife wants to, she can go back to exclusively breastfeeding. To throw another perspective on this, your baby has been cosy inside her mummy for nine months, to then be alone in a moses basket can be a shock! If you feel up to it, cosleeping (done safely) can help alot and during the daytime (and indeed evening when they're wee), slings can be amazing. We wouldn't have survived without our mei tai.

Rarri
03-08-2009, 09:57 PM
Meant to add, the La Leche League website has some great info on their answer pages, i found alot of solace there. http://www.llli.org/nb.html

stormie
03-08-2009, 10:11 PM
It's not low milk supply that leads to shredded nipples. Nipples in shreds are a sure sign the baby isn't properly latched on - usually because it's sucking at the nipple rather than fully latched at the breast. An improperly latched baby will not get enough milk, which in turn causes a reduction in milk supply. The more the baby nurses, the more milk you make, and vice versa.
Yes, exactly. That was the first thing I was told after giving birth. They showed me how to make sure my baby was latched on the right way and it didn't hurt.

James81
03-08-2009, 10:17 PM
Might want to watch consistently holding the baby until she goes to sleep. You start making that a habit and it's all you'll be doing. lol

What i used to do sometimes, instead of just holding my kids to put them to sleep, was I'd lay them in their crib and stand there with them and rub the tops of their eyes. That always worked really well.

And it just sounds like she was hungry man. Get you some milocon (sp?) drops too. Sometimes they get gassy and that pisses em off.

There's gonna be lots of nights like this, so from this point forward grab sleep WHENEVER you can. lol

Old Hack
03-08-2009, 10:20 PM
Yep, those first six weeks can be very difficult. My boys were both early and spent their first few weeks feeding for 20 minutes, sleeping for 40, pretty much around the clock. It's difficult, but can be done if everyone pulls their weight. I co-slept with my babies and my husband slept in another room so he could be fresh for work and driving around; I was at home all day so slept when my babies slept, and then spent the rest of the day nursing them!

I'm biased in favour of breastfeeding because my boys both did so very well on it (and both fed long-term): but really, this is your baby and you need to find a way that makes you all happy. Just bear in mind that breastfeeding gets easier the longer you do it, and tiny newborn mouths can struggle to latch on, hence the sore nipples. In a week or two it'll be easier, and in a month or two you'll wonder what was so difficult about it.

Meanwhile, just keep going, and you and your wife remember to be kind to each other. Having a new baby--particularly the first--can be very hard work, and very stressful, no matter how gorgeous she is.

Perks
03-08-2009, 10:25 PM
In a week or two it'll be easier, and in a month or two you'll wonder what was so difficult about it.


In a month or so, you'll have that blessed hindsight and see that a couple of weeks, as nightmarish as they feel while you're doing it, are just a phase. Breastfeeding is far healthier, thousands of dollars cheaper, and vastly more convenient than bottle feeding.

All chances are that your wife is perfectly capable of breastfeeding. The next ten days will be nothing but that and sleeping. It feels crazy, but it's so temporary. Write off the next ten days to insanity and sleeping at all hours of the day, but feeling like none, and you'll come out the other side a set of parents and a regular, ole baby.

Perks
03-08-2009, 10:30 PM
Might want to watch consistently holding the baby until she goes to sleep. You start making that a habit and it's all you'll be doing. lol


And I'm going to disagree with James, here. Surprise, surprise. Hold that baby as much as you want. Five days ago, she didn't even know there was an 'out there'. If you think you're freaked out at the changes, you're discomfiture's got nothing on the displacement she feels.

There will be all sorts of time for training once she's settled into the idea of planet Earth.

(And I'm not pushover. I acclimated my kids to a crib very early. It's just too traumatic on everyone to try to do it in the first few days.)

Perks
03-08-2009, 10:38 PM
I think one of the weirdest things about having a new baby, is the time warp. Most people sleep about a third of their lives. Think about it, you sleep a full day out of every three. So we get used to measuring only about two-thirds of our time.

Take away that sleep and suddenly, a day feels waaaay longer than you're used to. Four days into this new experiment and you've got a week's worth of running your ass off invested and you feel like, certainly, you should be better at it than you are, because you've been doing it for-ever.

That's all this is Allen, and Mrs. Allen. A time warp. Everyone told you, but until you experience it, it doesn't make any sense.

Get into the bed with that baby and pretend you have the flu. You aren't allowed to do anything but lay there, doze, and moan (and feed the baby.) In a few days, get up from your sick bed and start coming, slowly, back to life.

Clair Dickson
03-08-2009, 10:40 PM
There are nipple shields... I've heard they can help protect mommy's sensitive parts and thus make it easier to keep trying to get the hang of nursing. I don't know first hand how they work. My SIL was happy to hear about them, but I never did ask her how her boobs were doing... (we're not *that* close, and I don't have any carpet slugs of my own! Not that it's ever stopped me from offering advice. ;-)

Perks
03-08-2009, 10:46 PM
Nipple shields are generally for specific problem cases. Mostly, you just have to grit your teeth and make sure you're getting the baby positioned correctly. You really do have to load what looks like about half your breast into the baby's face to get it right. That's why a midwife or a lactation consultant is so valuable those first few days.

It's painful for about ten days, which, on top of being exhausted and feeling like you've been hit in the crotch with an axe, seems more than is fair to ask of a new mother. But she can do it, even better with someone who knows about these things assuring her in person.

Rarri
03-08-2009, 10:57 PM
Ah Perks, your posts has reminded me of this: 'Insanity is hereditary: you inherit it from your children'

It really is ok to hold your little one constantly; whether you follow attachment parenting or find the first few weeks easier by holding your little one. Our son was in a sling alot as a baby and we coslept until just after his first birthday, he's just as independent as his friends who were in strict routines and their own cots.

Cosleeping really is worthwhile at times with breastfeeding, takes off alot of the pressure from getting up constantly and if your wife uses a sling (guessing that you wouldn't be breastfeeding in the sling...) she can breastfeed at the same time which can be a real relief for being able to walk around and have hands free.

Perks
03-08-2009, 11:03 PM
Cosleeping really is worthwhile at times with breastfeeding, takes off alot of the pressure from getting up constantly and if your wife uses a sling (guessing that you wouldn't be breastfeeding in the sling...) she can breastfeed at the same time which can be a real relief for being able to walk around and have hands free.I have no problem with early co-sleeping, except that I couldn't do it. Lol! I'm a very light sleeper and having the girls with me just kept me too vigilant.

For me, I found that I just had to play jack-in-the-box and pop up and down all night for the first few weeks. It was awful, but at least when I was asleep, I was really asleep.

I'm not advising this, of course. It seems most people prefer to bring the baby in with them. I'm just saying that there are many ways to do it. I just can't endorse letting a newborn 'cry it out' so they don't get spoiled. A few months in? Absolutely, for short, but increasing, stints, because I do think infants and toddlers get very used to working their parents strings. But for newborns, I think it's just too much.

Of course, this is all opinion. Allen and his wife will just have to sift through and find what works for them.

Rarri
03-08-2009, 11:08 PM
For me, I found that I just had to play jack-in-the-box and pop up and down all night for the first few weeks. It was awful, but at least when I was asleep, I was really asleep.

I did that for a while until one night, around 3am, i was feeding my son and i saw a massive spider running across the floor; my resolve to cosleep suddenly increased enormously!

Every parent and baby are different, definitely!

Soccer Mom
03-08-2009, 11:22 PM
I wouldn't worry that you are holding the baby too much. Being held and cuddled is a very real need to small ones.

Wayne K
03-08-2009, 11:25 PM
I wouldn't worry that you are holding the baby too much. Being held and cuddled is a very real need to small ones.
And to some of us bigger types too...

MelodyO
03-09-2009, 01:53 AM
Glad to see you're getting consistent and non-contradictory advice, my dear! :tongue

Having a newborn can be hell, and all you can do is try different things and see what, if anything, works. My second baby was so horribly unhappy that the first time she ever allowed me to set her down without bursting into sobs, I wrote it on her 1st year calendar (she was 7 months). FWIW, she's a sweet and lovable 10 year old now.

My piece of advice, to go with all the others: the best thing I ever did was learn how to nurse while lying down on my side in bed. FINALLY, both of us could sleep.

All my best wishes and confidence in you both.

Carole
03-09-2009, 02:05 AM
I agree about the holding too much thing. I remember reading somewhere (can't for the life of me remember where) that it is impossible to spoil an infant by holding him or her too much. There are hospitals that bring in volunteers simply to hold newborns, particularly babies born to drug addicted mothers. Comforting and security is a need that infants have. :)

rhymegirl
03-09-2009, 02:13 AM
And to some of us bigger types too...

Yes. True. I especially like hugging.

underthecity
03-09-2009, 02:46 AM
I THINK we figured out the problem.

Earlier that day we had TGI Fridays Chicken Fajitas for dinner which I made on the stove. Its contents included green peppers and onions. So, perhaps the peppers and onions, after being digested by my wife, made it into the breast milk which gave little baby Alayna gas all night long. Perhaps the gas pains were painful.

That's the going theory.

Thanks a lot to everyone who replied in this thread. I hold her every chance I get. Perks, she has nipple shields given to her by the hospital. Most of the time the baby latches on just fine, sometimes, not so much.

Regarding co-sleeping, I can't do it. I can't have anything touching me at night while I try to sleep (makes cuddling with wife difficult), plus, if there's an infant in bed with me, I'm too paranoid to sleep, thinking I'm going to roll over on her. I know this because we babysat one of her baby cousins once and he slept in our bed. I don't want to repeat that experience.

Rarri
03-09-2009, 02:51 AM
I THINK we figured out the problem.

Earlier that day we had TGI Fridays Chicken Fajitas for dinner which I made on the stove. Its contents included green peppers and onions. So, perhaps the peppers and onions, after being digested by my wife, made it into the breast milk which gave little baby Alayna gas all night long. Perhaps the gas pains were painful.

That's the going theory.

Thanks a lot to everyone who replied in this thread. I hold her every chance I get. Perks, she has nipple shields given to her by the hospital. Most of the time the baby latches on just fine, sometimes, not so much.

Regarding co-sleeping, I can't do it. I can't have anything touching me at night while I try to sleep (makes cuddling with wife difficult), plus, if there's an infant in bed with me, I'm too paranoid to sleep, thinking I'm going to roll over on her. I know this because we babysat one of her baby cousins once and he slept in our bed. I don't want to repeat that experience.

That's ok, co-sleeping isn't for everyone :)

Your theory could very well be true, it's well known that the foods a mother eats impact on her milk. For example, if the mother eats a curry, the baby may have an upset tummy or some very strange nappies. Similar with allergies, sometimes if the baby is allergic to something, the mother may have to cut out the allergen from her diet to prevent upset for the baby.

KikiteNeko
03-09-2009, 02:55 AM
She could have acid reflux. My cousin's baby had that and she would scream all night and they had no idea what was wrong.

scarletpeaches
03-09-2009, 03:00 AM
We've been breast feeding our newborn...

How the hell did you manage that? You're a medical miracle, man!

Silver King
03-09-2009, 03:14 AM
How the hell did you manage that? You're a medical miracle, man!
That must've happened after "they" delivered the baby. :D

All of my kids were crying, screeching little freaks for at least the first couple of weeks. It only scared us with the first one. After that, we knew what to expect.

Great advice earlier about seeking help to make sure the child is latching on properly. My daughter went through a horrible first few days with her child until my wife coached her to successful feeding. Then that baby turned into a suckling machine you could hear from across the room. :)

Beach Bunny
03-09-2009, 04:02 AM
You can try the "cuddle cure": http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/lifestyle/80970_cry.shtml

Perks
03-09-2009, 04:16 AM
Your theory could very well be true, it's well known that the foods a mother eats impact on her milk. For example, if the mother eats a curry, the baby may have an upset tummy or some very strange nappies. Actually, that's pretty highly under dispute and often dismissed as a modern myth. Think of all the nursing mothers in India, Ethiopia, and all over the world where diets are full of intense flavors and spices for each meal, every day.

Allayna was most likely clearing her system of the labor and epidural drugs and having a new-baby freak out. Hopefully tonight will be better, but she's still brand new. They're probably in for at least the usual amount of ugly days and nights and I get a bit concerned when it is linked back to breastmilk or something the mother could have done differently.

Devil Ledbetter
03-09-2009, 04:57 AM
Actually, that's pretty highly under dispute and often dismissed as a modern myth. Think of all the nursing mothers in India, Ethiopia, and all over the world where diets are full of intense flavors and spices for each meal, every day.


Allayna was most likely clearing her system of the labor and epidural drugs and having a new-baby freak out. Hopefully tonight will be better, but she's still brand new. They're probably in for at least the usual amount of ugly days and nights and I get a bit concerned when it is linked back to breastmilk or something the mother could have done differently.Ahh, the voice of reason.

The one downside of breastfeeding is how quick we are to blame mom and accuse her of inadequate milk supply, eating the "wrong" things, etc. whenever baby is fussy. Sometimes babies are just fussy. Sometimes there is a reason for fussing. Rarely is the reason breastmilk.

In a culture where we've lost all confidence in the adequacy of our own bodies to nurture our children, breastfeeding becomes an act of boldness, bravery, and defiance.

Perks
03-09-2009, 05:01 AM
Sometimes there is a reason for fussing. I blame the little shits for not learning English fast enough. If they'd just tell us what the problem was, I can guarantee we'd fix it, if only to make that horrible noise stop.

rhymegirl
03-09-2009, 05:08 AM
See, I said it was gas.

That will be $100.00.

popbunny
03-09-2009, 05:27 AM
Moms who eat curry throughout their pregnancy will likely not have to stop eating it while bf. When I'm nursing my babes, I have to avoid all dairy - in pregnancy I take calcium pills because I hate dairy, so possibly the babes don't do well with it because they weren't exposed to it in the womb.

Give your wife a babymoon. In our society we're in such a rush to get babies on a schedule, get mom out of the house. It's bs. Mom and babe need to have an extended nurse in - lay in bed for days on end nursing on demand. If cosleeping isn't something you can do in your marital bed, she can do it in another bedroom with a single or double bed set up. Once she learns how to nurse lying down it'll be much easier.

The first few weeks are exhausting, emotional and crazy. The saying for new parents is that the nights are long and the years short. The nights will seem endless for awhile, and suddenly it's their first day of school.

Hold your baby, keep trying the breast and get help with that if she needs it. It truly is best!

Silver King
03-09-2009, 05:43 AM
...In a culture where we've lost all confidence in the adequacy of our own bodies to nurture our children, breastfeeding becomes an act of boldness, bravery, and defiance.
I remember a few years ago when formula companies were touting their wares as superior to mothers' milk. It's amazing that some people actually believed that to be true.

A couple of personal insights:

When my grandson was born, his mom (my son's wife) fed him skim milk you buy at the grocery store. This went on for a few weeks before I realized what was happening and loaded them up with formula. I feared the boy would not develop properly, but several years later, he seems perfectly normal.

When my daughter first started nursing in public, she used a poncho-type covering that fit over her head and engulfed her and the baby. The main problem was that the child was uncomfortable and sweating to high heaven under the covering and wouldn't feed well. After a while, my daughter ditched the poncho and fed her child as discreetly as possible, which seemed to make both of them happy.

SusanH
03-09-2009, 05:53 AM
I Have a grandaughter that went through that. Mixing breast milk with formula is ok for baby, but sometimes it can give the baby gas. Go to Walgreens or CVS and buy the mylacon baby gas drops.( ask pharmaist) It is the only thing that worked for her. It is a life saver. My daughter just had her second baby 5 days ago and her nipples are to sore to nurse so she is supplementing with formula. She already has 4 boxes of the mylacon in her fridge. It really works. Mixing formula with breast milk can also constipate so go to the same pharmacy and pick up some glyceryn suppositories...They are also a life saver..... Baby should not be made to suffer.....fix it as soon as possible....

Devil Ledbetter
03-09-2009, 05:58 AM
I remember a few years ago when formula companies were touting their wares as superior to mothers' milk. It's amazing that some people actually believed that to be true.

A couple of personal insights:

When my grandson was born, his mom (my son's wife) fed him skim milk you buy at the grocery store. This went on for a few weeks before I realized what was happening and loaded them up with formula. I feared the boy would not develop properly, but several years later, he seems perfectly normal.Aaaack! Wherever did she get the idea to do that? I'm glad he's okay.


When my daughter first started nursing in public, she used a poncho-type covering that fit over her head and engulfed her and the baby. The main problem was that the child was uncomfortable and sweating to high heaven under the covering and wouldn't feed well. After a while, my daughter ditched the poncho and fed her child as discreetly as possible, which seemed to make both of them happy.Ponchos, tenting with blankets, etc. are not only uncomfortable, but seem to draw more attention than a discreetly lifted shirt or one unbuttoned from the bottom rather than the top. I've nursed in public more times than I can count - restaurants, parks, swimming pools, parties, even walking around the grocery store with the baby in a sling. I've never "flashed" anyone or drawn any attention for it. The trick is easy-access clothing, confidence, calmness, and making eye-contact with people.

When my youngest was a few days old I went to my sister's "opening" party at an art gallery. I had my son tucked into a Maya Wrap sling. A fashion-hound friend of my mother's came up to me and declared "I love your purse! Where did you get it? I need one of those."

I said "Oh, you don't want one of these purses. They're really noisy and they leak." I pulled back the fabric to show her my sleeping newborn. She about fell over.

Devil Ledbetter
03-09-2009, 06:10 AM
I Have a grandaughter that went through that. Mixing breast milk with formula is ok for baby, but sometimes it can give the baby gas. Go to Walgreens or CVS and buy the mylacon baby gas drops.( ask pharmaist) It is the only thing that worked for her. It is a life saver. My daughter just had her second baby 5 days ago and her nipples are to sore to nurse so she is supplementing with formula. She already has 4 boxes of the mylacon in her fridge. It really works. Mixing formula with breast milk can also constipate so go to the same pharmacy and pick up some glyceryn suppositories...They are also a life saver..... Baby should not be made to suffer.....fix it as soon as possible....No. Mixing formula and breast milk does not cause gas, fussiness or constipation. In fact, constipation is absolutely unheard of in exclusively breastfed babies.

Formula can cause constipation though. Better to avoid it altogether if possible. If you breastfeed exclusively, you're not going to need glycerin suppositories.

If your daughter's nipples are too sore to nurse, the baby is improperly latched at the breast. Here is a simple demonstration of why that is: place your index finger in your mouth just ahead of your first knuckle and suck. Notice how your tongue rubs the end of your finger? That's exactly what an improperly latched baby does to a nipple. Now place your finger in your mouth up to the second knuckle and suck. Notice how you couldn't make your tongue rub against the finger tip even if you tried? That's why a properly latched baby will not make nipples very sore.

There is the "getting used to nursing" tenderness we all experience, and then there is the "scrape me off the ceiling" agony of nursing with nipples shredded by improper latch. A La Leche League leader or lactation consultant can provide your daughter with accurate breastfeeding advice that will get your daughter and grandchild off the formula/gas/mylocon/constipation/glycerin suppositories merry-go-round they've just stepped on.

underthecity
03-09-2009, 06:40 AM
You can try the "cuddle cure": http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/lifestyle/80970_cry.shtml

I have that book!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am reading it now and have been practicing learning about how to do the "Five Ss" for several days now. Still working on it.

One thing that became an instant hero in our house is the "Swaddler." It's this cloth thing that wraps and attaches itself together with velcro to create a nice, instant swaddle. It won't wiggle apart when she kicks her legs, and seems nice and cozy. We used it today and I swear, she slept for four hours straight. When we undid her to change her diaper, we discovered she had her legs folded exactly like they had been in the womb. So, in essence she had regressed to the womb environment. It was the cutest thing.

kristie911
03-09-2009, 10:56 AM
I loved my Swaddler...it was a total lifesaver. I used it until my son was too big for it. It was the only way he would sleep for more than 4 hours.

I wish I could get one for him now...maybe he'd sleep all night. Can you swaddle a 4 year old? :)

CaroGirl
03-09-2009, 04:56 PM
The more you hold the baby now, the more secure the baby will feel, and the less you'll have to hold her later. She'll eventually come to know you're there for her always, whether you're holding her or not. Do not stress her out by letting her lie in a crib and cry. Not at this age.

Regarding the sore nipples, my 2nd baby was "tongue-tied," meaning her tongue formed a heart shape when she stuck it out because the string of flesh under the tongue was too far toward the end of her tongue. She didn't get a good latch, kept coming on and off and losing suction. So my nipples bled and bled. The pain was excruciating. We had to go to the hospital to get the flesh snipped back. Voila, no more problem. Alayna might not be tongue tied, but I'm just throwing it out as a possibility.

Does your area have a "well-baby drop-in centre"? It's a place you can take your baby, for free, staffed by qualified nurses. They'll weigh your baby and answer any questions you have. They'll observe your wife's latch and give advice. This might be just a Canadian thing but I loved my well-baby drop-in. I met other mums and we started a coffee group. It rocked.

SusanH
03-10-2009, 01:47 AM
No. Mixing formula and breast milk does not cause gas, fussiness or constipation. In fact, constipation is absolutely unheard of in exclusively breastfed babies.

Formula can cause constipation though. Better to avoid it altogether if possible. If you breastfeed exclusively, you're not going to need glycerin suppositories.

If your daughter's nipples are too sore to nurse, the baby is improperly latched at the breast. Here is a simple demonstration of why that is: place your index finger in your mouth just ahead of your first knuckle and suck. Notice how your tongue rubs the end of your finger? That's exactly what an improperly latched baby does to a nipple. Now place your finger in your mouth up to the second knuckle and suck. Notice how you couldn't make your tongue rub against the finger tip even if you tried? That's why a properly latched baby will not make nipples very sore.

There is the "getting used to nursing" tenderness we all experience, and then there is the "scrape me off the ceiling" agony of nursing with nipples shredded by improper latch. A La Leche League leader or lactation consultant can provide your daughter with accurate breastfeeding advice that will get your daughter and grandchild off the formula/gas/mylocon/constipation/glycerin suppositories merry-go-round they've just stepped on.


I hate to disagree with you, but I am going by what her pediatrician and the breast feeding nurse told her and her own experience with it. I also breastfed my three children and have been a nurse for 37 years, some on the OB floor. Breast milk doesn't cause constipitation but will cause some gas. Depends on the baby's digestive tract... Breast feeding nurse said baby was latched on right, he just has a harder suck than most.... My first grandchild had to be switched from the breast to bottle and that is where her problem started.

I was just giving a little advice from experience especially in the middle of the night when the infant is screaming his head off. Better to have the medicine on hand for relief vs. running to the ER where they will give him a $300.00 suppository.........you didn't need to give me a lecture.

underthecity
03-10-2009, 02:44 AM
Does your area have a "well-baby drop-in centre"? It's a place you can take your baby, for free, staffed by qualified nurses. They'll weigh your baby and answer any questions you have. They'll observe your wife's latch and give advice.

As far as I know, Alayna's tongue is normal, so I'm not sure if the tongue's a problem or not.

Since Saturday night, she's been feeding a lot better, 99% breast milk 'til now. She's slept through the night better (knock on wood), waking every two to three hours to feed.

We had an appointment today at the hospital so the Lactation Specialist could meet with us. While there, she had to breast feed and the LS observed the feeding on both breasts and said both mom and baby are doing fine. Only, Alayna is "playing around" too much, that is, latches on, feeds, then takes herself off then puts herself back on. We're not sure yet how to cure her of it.

So far so good. Five days down, 18 to 21 more years to go.

Perks
03-10-2009, 02:48 AM
I was just giving a little advice from experience especially in the middle of the night when the infant is screaming his head off. Better to have the medicine on hand for relief vs. running to the ER where they will give him a $300.00 suppository.........you didn't need to give me a lecture.I don't think it was meant as a lecture. Obstetric advice of the last fifty years is often at odds with more recent research specific to breastfeeding.

Constipation resulting from a switch to formula is very consistent with the most current information, but I've not come across anything that suggests breastmilk is more likely to cause excess gas than formula.

If I can presume to speak for DL as well as for myself, I think we are just trying to reassure them that a crying jag, at day 4, doesn't mean they need to do anything. It's a lot to take in when everyone's saying that their baby's stomach may be underdeveloped, or her tongue tied, or that she may be allergic to something her mother ate, or that breastfeeding might not work, or maybe they need medicine, etc. (Not that some of these things don't happen and make new parenthood miserable.)

Four day old babies are likely to cry. For hours at a time. It happens. It doesn't mean they did anything wrong or need to do anything differently. Three weeks from now, it may be a different story altogether. But for now, all's probably well and hell, all at the same time.

SusanH
03-10-2009, 02:53 AM
So glad things are going well. From my experience, the baby will stop letting go and attaching again when she gets a little stronger. Her jaws are more than likely tired.... but this is my experience. You know your baby best. I wish you the best and enjoy every minute and take lots of pictures and movies.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:03 AM
Those are all the highlights, and I'm not sure I got all the details right because the whole night's a blur. In a nutshell, baby screaming nonstop, fed formula and breastmilk, kept screaming all night. And she ate a lot. Now ahe's fine.

So, what in the world was going on? Any mothers want to take a crack? Was it really a demon? And if this happens again, what do we do?

(BTW, otherwise, everything's great and we love her to death.)

My first couple of weeks with my son are a blur, also. I think that happens so there is no resentment later in life. ;)

A couple of things that helped me incredibly with my son for the first few months were a rocking chair and a swing suitable for a newborn. One that sways both directions, side to side and front to back.

I do stand behind the rocking chair however. Get one if you don't have one (you mention your wife having to hold the baby in bed). A rocker will help both of them get some shut eye.

Same for the swing, my son spent many hours in that swing and it helped. No harm in it if it brings both mommy and baby satisfaction.

Something else that helped me with feedings was that my son was bottle fed in the NICU for the first 3 days of his life. The bad thing about that was that he developed a pattern with feedings. His feedings became larger very quickly, I think I had him on 8 0z bottles not long after coming home, I can't remember exactly. Maybe your baby is a hungry baby.

Are you burping her? Might be uncomfortable if she's gassy. Who knows. Every baby brings a whole new mistery, I think. Oh, and swaddling, you may not be swaddling snug enough for her standards.

Oh, and this is just me, but if my boyfriend ever used the word "we" as you did with your wife breastfeeding, I'd have slapped him. ;)

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:11 AM
Ah, you have my sympathy.
When my lad was born I tried breastfeeding but I just wasn't producing enough. As a consequence my nipples were in shreds.
We were lucky, we lived in England at the time and so we could phone the maternity unit at 3.00 in the morning and get advice.
Their advice was to switch entirely over to formula. It worked like a charm because we knew how much Nat was getting.
Did you burp Alayna after she fed? She could have indigestion. You should really get her to burp before you lay her back down again.

Yea, once you're on formula I bet you will all get a little more sleep. I stopped BF'ing after 3 weeks. I couldn't handle it. The pain, the leaking, all of it.

As for the burping bit, be careful. I failed to burp my son one night when he was 2 weeks old and put him down in his crib, I walked away and returned to find him gurgling on spit up. He'd choked on his burp-up. He wasn't breathing.

A 911 call, a studio apartment filled with medics, ambulance ride to a park, helicopter ride to childrens hospital, and a night in the hospital taught me to make that baby burp. And if I couldn't burp him, and HAD to lay him down, he was propped up so any spillage would run down his chin.

Babies, fun. You learn as you go. ;)

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:14 AM
It was a warm night and the room was warm. She was wearing a sleeper and was usually swaddled, but she kept kicking it off. I don't want to overheat her.



Ah, I'd say dress her a little looser, and swaddle a little tighter. She wants to be snug and safe. I'd bet on it.

Silver King
03-10-2009, 03:21 AM
Aaaack! Wherever did she get the idea to do that? I'm glad he's okay.
She learned that from her grandmother, a backwoods ninny who wouldn't know her ass from her elbow even if you provided diagrams. Another timeless piece of advice she shared had to do with burping, where the infant lays on her stomach across the mother's lap after feeding. Then, similar to a bongo player, the baby's back is drummed with both hands.

I could go on, but it's too depressing. I've often tried to offer advice, in a nice way without seeming like I'm meddling, but it's all fallen on deaf ears. Her grandma knows best.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:23 AM
What i used to do sometimes, instead of just holding my kids to put them to sleep, was I'd lay them in their crib and stand there with them and rub the tops of their eyes. That always worked really well.



I totally thought you said "I lay with them in their crib..." haha.

UTC, try EVERYTHING. If your wife is comfortable doing this so early, put the baby in a crib. Have a crib melody light player, playing soothing ocean sounds, hehe, or what ever.

Lights and sound help. Patting her helps. Jiggle the side of the crib, that helps. Do it all. You'll eventually find something that she enjoys and gets her to sleep a little faster.

One night we swaddled my son and set the "sound/light" player on and got into bed. The crib was next to our bed and the player came with a remote, so I lay with my arm hanging out the bed and each time the player would stop, I'd hit the remote and set it off again. Did this a few times, till he fell asleep. Do what you can. ;)

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:26 AM
Get into the bed with that baby and pretend you have the flu. You aren't allowed to do anything but lay there, doze, and moan (and feed the baby.) In a few days, get up from your sick bed and start coming, slowly, back to life.

Yea, they actually do become quite fun to have around.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:27 AM
It's painful for about ten days, which, on top of being exhausted and feeling like you've been hit in the crotch with an axe, seems more than is fair to ask of a new mother.

Gawd, if that isn't hitting it RIGHT ON THE HEAD.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 03:37 AM
I THINK we figured out the problem.

Earlier that day we had TGI Fridays Chicken Fajitas for dinner which I made on the stove. Its contents included green peppers and onions. So, perhaps the peppers and onions, after being digested by my wife, made it into the breast milk which gave little baby Alayna gas all night long. Perhaps the gas pains were painful.

That's the going theory.



this happened to my cousin. see, trial by error.

writerterri
03-10-2009, 05:46 AM
Not sure if this was said yet but my first two had heart burn from my milk and the cows milk. Just would scream out of the blue after eating or sometime later. I tried not to drink milk or have milk products or onions or anything that could cause gas as well. My daughter had to have baby Zantac because the pain was causing her distress and making her breath too hard and fast. They both had to have soy formula too. Stinky! But restful.

Does your baby turn her head to one side or the other when she screams? That may be a sign she has gerd. If she arches her back, gas.

It runs heavily in my family. Everyone who is related to my grandparents has it.

Happy parenting!

Or something like that. = )

Devil Ledbetter
03-10-2009, 06:03 AM
As far as I know, Alayna's tongue is normal, so I'm not sure if the tongue's a problem or not.

Since Saturday night, she's been feeding a lot better, 99% breast milk 'til now. She's slept through the night better (knock on wood), waking every two to three hours to feed.

We had an appointment today at the hospital so the Lactation Specialist could meet with us. While there, she had to breast feed and the LS observed the feeding on both breasts and said both mom and baby are doing fine. Only, Alayna is "playing around" too much, that is, latches on, feeds, then takes herself off then puts herself back on. We're not sure yet how to cure her of it.

So far so good. Five days down, 18 to 21 more years to go.Once the milk has come in, "overactive letdown" can mean a little more milk than the baby can handle may be flowing out all at once. If she can't handle it, she'll pull off (rather than gag on it). This is an issue I experienced with my son. I found that letting him come off and just letting the milk flow slow down for a few minutes before latching him back on was usually enough to keep him comfortable. Also, nursing "uphill," that is, with his head higher than my breast, made gravity work against the milk flow thereby slowing it down to a level he could handle.

They get better at handling flow themselves as they get a little bigger.

I'm so glad to hear things are going better now.

underthecity
03-10-2009, 06:09 AM
Are you burping her? Might be uncomfortable if she's gassy. Who knows. Every baby brings a whole new mistery, I think. Oh, and swaddling, you may not be swaddling snug enough for her standards.

Oh, and this is just me, but if my boyfriend ever used the word "we" as you did with your wife breastfeeding, I'd have slapped him. ;)

Yes, we burp her after feeding. Usually, to be safe, I'll tap her back for five minutes to make sure she's burped in case I didn't hear her.

Regarding the "we" part in the "we're breastfeeding," while she is doing the hard work, I am there to assist. It's a joint effort. I'm supporting her as much as I can, I'm stimulating the baby, I'm repositioning the boppy, things like that. If I just left the room while she did it, then I'd say "she's breastfeeding."

Writerterri, she usually lays on her back while screaming, at least she did Saturday night. We think it's gas, too. Although the lactation specialist said that it could have been because she just wanted to scream.

Oh, and we do have a rocking chair. This was my wife's big Christmas present from me (thank you, Cracker Barrel). And little baby just loves it when Daddy rocks her in the chair while holding her. Also, my wife does sit in it to nurse during the day, or to pump breastmilk on what I've come to call "the milking machine." It's only at night at 3 a.m. when she sits up in bed to nurse.

Devil Ledbetter
03-10-2009, 06:23 AM
Regarding the "we" part in the "we're breastfeeding," while she is doing the hard work, I am there to assist. It's a joint effort. I'm supporting her as much as I can, I'm stimulating the baby, I'm repositioning the boppy, things like that. If I just left the room while she did it, then I'd say "she's breastfeeding."I wish I could give you 1,000 reps for this. :snoopy:

Breastfeeding is a family effort. A supportive spouse can make a huge difference in breastfeeding success. My DH used to bring me a glass of ice water when I sat down to nurse. (Nursing will make you ridiculously thirsty.)

For my second, I had a little basket where I'd put one of the cordless phones, some reading material, a water bottle, fresh burp rags, Lansinoh (http://refs05.securesites.net/snap038/index.php?src=directory&view=Products&category=Breast%20Therapies&query=category.eq.Breast%20Therapies&refno=19&srctype=Products_detail), etc. I'd grab it to take with me wherever I was sitting down to nurse; that way I had everything I needed and didn't always have to nurse in the same spot.

underthecity
03-10-2009, 06:38 AM
For my second, I had a little basket where I'd put one of the cordless phones, some reading material, a water bottle, fresh burp rags, Lansinoh (http://refs05.securesites.net/snap038/index.php?src=directory&view=Products&category=Breast%20Therapies&query=category.eq.Breast%20Therapies&refno=19&srctype=Products_detail), etc.

Thank you! And I do bring her ice water at her request. Plus, regarding the Lansinoh, we got some from the hospital, but I had to buy more at the grocery store. I didn't know where it was and had to ask the teenage girl working in the aisle where the "Lanisoh nipple cream for nursing mothers" was. I think my face turned red, but she knew right where it was.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 08:20 AM
Oh, and we do have a rocking chair. This was my wife's big Christmas present from me (thank you, Cracker Barrel). And little baby just loves it when Daddy rocks her in the chair while holding her. Also, my wife does sit in it to nurse during the day, or to pump breastmilk on what I've come to call "the milking machine." It's only at night at 3 a.m. when she sits up in bed to nurse.

Yea, many a night was sat in my rocking chair. ;) You sound like you're doing just fine. Your wife is very lucky to have you by her side.

Perks
03-10-2009, 03:07 PM
Ha! Allen, you reminded me how ridiculously thirsty I'd get while nursing, at first. I have no idea what that's all about, but it, like everything else, sorts itself out in a couple of weeks and she won't feel like she's been crawling through the desert without chapstick to get to the baby.

As for the rocking chair, I hope that lasts. One of the weirdest things is the 'baby altimeter'. At some point, they often seem to decide that being held is not enough -- you must be standing up. I don't even understand how they can tell the difference. They've got their eyes closed! Almost every baby I've known has done this and it's just plain strange.

You guys sound like you've got a good setup and are a wonderful support for each other and baby Alayna. It's great to know!

James81
03-10-2009, 04:19 PM
As for the rocking chair, I hope that lasts. One of the weirdest things is the 'baby altimeter'. At some point, they often seem to decide that being held is not enough -- you must be standing up. I don't even understand how they can tell the difference. They've got their eyes closed! Almost every baby I've known has done this and it's just plain strange.



Heh, my kids never did this.

CaroGirl
03-10-2009, 04:24 PM
As for the rocking chair, I hope that lasts. One of the weirdest things is the 'baby altimeter'. At some point, they often seem to decide that being held is not enough -- you must be standing up. I don't even understand how they can tell the difference. They've got their eyes closed! Almost every baby I've known has done this and it's just plain strange.
Both my babies did this. My daughter was worse. I carried her around everywhere for the first 3 months of her life. When she was very small, I carried her across my forearm, on her stomach, with a leg on each side of my arm and her chin in my palm. It calmed and soothed her and allowed me to get things done with my other hand, like make a sandwich so I wouldn't starve to death.

jennifer75
03-10-2009, 07:55 PM
At some point, they often seem to decide that being held is not enough -- you must be standing up.

And do the stand and sway.....

I remember, not long ago actually, I was standing and found myself starting to do the hip sway. Funny how it just stays with you.

trickywoo
03-11-2009, 01:36 AM
Maybe over feeding? It takes awhile to get the hang of different cries. Try and watch for a minute next time. Hunger cry sounds almost monotone and repetitive. Gas cry gets the little lizardy tongue and arched back. It's like learning a new language to figure out what they want. I found "The Secrets of the Baby Whisperer" to be a super helpful read the first time around.

I can totally sympathize. You'll get it! It does get easier.

Haggis
03-11-2009, 05:48 AM
I think the important thing here is to get all the rules of child care down. Here, in this very link, are all the things a father has to know about raising a baby.

Linky here (http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o15/Damnhaggis/babyinstructions.jpg).

No need to thank me.

C.bronco
03-11-2009, 05:53 AM
Wow, Allen, your post gave me a flashback! :)
When her milk comes in, it will suddenly get much easier and much more peaceful. Don't worry! I had the exact same day 6 1/2 years ago.

C.bronco
03-11-2009, 06:01 AM
P.S. I was told to avoid broccoli while breastfeeding because it could make the baby gassy, and to avoid garlic because it would affect the taste of the breastmilk.

chevbrock
03-11-2009, 04:01 PM
When my milk "came in" for Missy Moo, she did pretty much the same thing. It was like she was suddenly starving and nothing would soothe her but being constantly attached. It settled down after a couple of days.

Master Four had something similar, but I think it was the hospital-issue chicken curry - as soon as he pooped that one out, he was fine, and slept all afternoon.

Please do everything you can to look after your beautiful wife. Try not to stress, and ask as many questions to as many different people as you can.

Devil Ledbetter
03-11-2009, 04:42 PM
P.S. I was told to avoid broccoli while breastfeeding because it could make the baby gassy, and to avoid garlic because it would affect the taste of the breastmilk.It can affect the taste but that's not a bad thing. We use a lot of fresh garlic in our diet, and both of my breastfed kids adore garlic and always have.

Fresh garlic also prevents thrush.

James81
03-11-2009, 04:45 PM
P.S. I was told to avoid broccoli while breastfeeding because it could make the baby gassy, and to avoid garlic because it would affect the taste of the breastmilk.

It always cracked me up how everybody always had advice like this for new parents.

Avoid this, do this, this makes them gassy, this makes them pee, this make their left pinky crook slightly to the left, that makes them roll around their crib in a fiery gob of anger. lol

Kinda feel sorry for new parents.