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Pencilone
06-01-2005, 06:55 PM
If someone calls your proposal 'intriguing and exciting' but they still give it a pass, as it is not appropriate for their current projects... Is this just a polite way to say 'No, bugger off!', or do you think they really mean it when they call it 'exciting and intriguing'?

I know that at the end of the day this is just a rejection, but still.... Is it something there worth reading between the lines?

... Or am I just kidding myself?

Torgo
06-01-2005, 07:15 PM
Some editors will give you the flannel, but it's so much easier just to send a rejection slip, so this probably is good news. (Bear in mind exciting and intriguing probably means they thought it was pretty exciting and mildly intriguing.) Be of good cheer and keep sending the work out until there's nobody left who might want to buy it; at that point write something even more exciting and so intriguing that it will be unsafe for the editor to drive or operate heavy machinery until they finish it.

Jamesaritchie
06-01-2005, 07:29 PM
If someone calls your proposal 'intriguing and exciting' but they still give it a pass, as it is not appropriate for their current projects... Is this just a polite way to say 'No, bugger off!', or do you think they really mean it when they call it 'exciting and intriguing'?

I know that at the end of the day this is just a rejection, but still.... Is it something there worth reading between the lines?

... Or am I just kidding myself?

In all honesty, there's no way of answering this. Rejections come in many forms, and with many different wordings. I've seen agents and editors call something wonderful that they hadn't even read past page three, and I've seen agents and editors call things terrible that they hadn't read past page one. Trying to read between the lines is futile.

Unless a rejection comes with a request for a rewrite, or with a hand scribbled note, there's simply no way of telling what the agent or editor really thought.

dragonjax
06-01-2005, 09:54 PM
It's worlds better than, "Don't quit your day job." :ROFL:

Seriously: move on. If you continue getting rejections on your work, see if there's a common thread. Other than that, there's just no way of knowing why it didn't work for a particular agent.

Best of luck to you!

Jenny
06-02-2005, 05:26 AM
My opinion is that all feedback that can possibly be read, twisted, wrangled into being positive should be accepted with loud halloos. I find after a few months away with a publisher, the returning work shrieks its errors/flaws to me without any help from the rejecter. So, congratulations on an "exciting and intriguing" bit of writing. Good luck giving it yet another polish and here's hoping the next time you send it out it comes back with a contract.

Talking of stories "fetching" a contract/acceptance, I don't know why I'll ever succeed at writing, I can't even convince the dog to fetch and give, drop, hand it over.

Just the opinion of a failed writer, dog trainer who continues to hold on by her fingertips. I guess that makes me certifiably optimistic.

Jenny

Pencilone
06-02-2005, 11:33 AM
Thanks guys! Your kind words mean more than you think.:kiss:

BenMears
06-03-2005, 07:32 AM
Here's how I suggest you discover the answer to your question--

Is that proposal right now this minute on its way to another editor?

If so, then you are definitely the real thing, no kidding, and it will be even more intriguing and exciting to see what this second editor, who might even buy your proposal, has to say about it.

That said, I am all in favor of kidding oneself, in positive ways. Fake it till you make it. Do the work, the work must be real, but energy and confidence you can manufacture out of air, if you wish.

Best of luck.

Pencilone
06-04-2005, 01:32 PM
Thanks Ben.

I have not sent it to another editor again because I already started rewriting it. I hope to finish the changes I want to make in a couple of months and then I'll definitely ship it around.

The thing is that the proposal I was judged upon had only 2 paragraphs and he could not have possible know how my book is like from just 120 words (that actually contained part of the main conflict and a hook). I wish I sent him a synopsis and 3 chapters, but it was my first dip in the muddy waters of the publishing world and I will definitely prepare my ammunition better next time.

Keeping in mind that I sent my proposal to a publisher that does not accept unagented submissions, I am pretty happy that at least I got a professional reply.

SRHowen
06-04-2005, 05:30 PM
If you rewrite each time you get a rejection you'll never get anywhere.

Let me share something--I got a rejection some time ago that seemed to be a personal one, it said things that seemed to apply to me--loved the plot, the characters but the overall story just didn't grab me enough to offer you representation at this time. (urgh my hands are numb this Am having a nasty time keying)

I really fretted over that one--

Then when sharing the rejection with a friend who was also sending out querys to the same agents I was we discovered we had gotten the same rejection letter--word for word.

After that, unless the rejection said something like --When Sam jumps off the cliff in chapter 9 it doesn't make sense with the rest of the story--I tossed them aside and went on to the next agent.

So just go on, unless there are personal details about YOUR story it's just a rejection.

Jamesaritchie
06-04-2005, 08:11 PM
Unless yu see a glaring and blatant error, I agree about not rewriting. Just send the thing out again and again. Keep sending it out until there's flat nowhere left to send it. In the meantime, keep writing other books and other proposals.

Unless someone with a checkbook asks for changes, it's usually best to leave the writing alone.

Julie Worth
06-06-2005, 08:14 PM
...at that point write something even more exciting and so intriguing that it will be unsafe for the editor to drive or operate heavy machinery until they finish it.

So true!

But for agents, it’s likely the query that’s the problem, not the ms. And maybe they’re not getting past THE UNSEXY TITLE. I'd been slogging away, getting mostly form rejections, before a marketing person said she didn’t like the title, working title though it was. Awful, she said, not sexy. So I picked a new one, a sexy one. And then I realized that my query reflected this original, unsexy title. It reflected my personal view of what I’d written, but that wasn’t the only possible viewpoint. So I rewrote it, with sexy reverberating in my head—and lo! Since then—a couple of weeks ago—I’ve gotten nothing but personal responses. A strong project, said one. What an intriguing story, said another.