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mcnorth
03-06-2009, 01:18 AM
For the old people... who write for teens.

Smish
03-06-2009, 01:21 AM
Lol. Perhaps we should define "old" -- I'm not sure if I qualify :)

donut
03-06-2009, 01:45 AM
HAHAHAHAHA.

*loves north*

Esopha
03-06-2009, 01:45 AM
oh my god.

I love this thread so much right now.

*tosses flowers from RM*

:D

Smish
03-06-2009, 01:48 AM
The Teens Writing for Teens thread has like 5,000 posts or something. I'm not sure we can catch up :)

Smish
03-06-2009, 01:52 AM
Eventually, they'll age out of their thread... and will have to join ours. So, we just need to be patient. We'll eventually overtake them :)

Esopha
03-06-2009, 01:57 AM
I know. I got all goose-bumpy when I saw it.

I definitely don't qualify to hang out in this thread, though. I'm just cracking up in my happy corner.

matdonna
03-06-2009, 02:00 AM
I am pretty sure I must qualify now, since I am a grandma (will be for the second time next month).

My knees feel old. But I'm on Facebook, can I really be old? :P

CACTUSWENDY
03-06-2009, 02:04 AM
Shoot....I have tons of years on all the teens....and I just did a story for them. .....................................walks away...mumbles to self.....I am not old....just seasoned.

Smish
03-06-2009, 02:08 AM
Shoot....I have tons of years on all the teens....and I just did a story for them. .....................................walks away...mumbles to self.....I am not old....just seasoned.

With sugar and spice and everything nice, right? :)

RoseColoredSkies
03-06-2009, 02:22 AM
Do I count as old? I'm only 21 but I'm clearly not a teen anymore. I think I shall hang out with all you cool people! We have to keep each other entertained!

kaitlin008
03-06-2009, 02:36 AM
Yeah, I feel left out because I'm not sure if I belong in the old thread (I'm 23) but I definitely don't belong in the teen thread. I think I'll hang out here anyway, though.

Zoombie
03-06-2009, 02:42 AM
McNorth: Hero of Everything.

Clair Dickson
03-06-2009, 02:44 AM
My husband's 98 year old grandfather refuses to use a cane because canes are for old people and he's not old. =)

Maybe this should just be the thread of people who are glad not to be pimply-faced, awkward teenagers anymore. But who still write for teens. Just use "old" as a synonym for "not a teenager anymore."

(I don't write for teens, but I thought this was an amusing thread and stopped by. *waves*)

Of course, I'll stay away from the question-- what is SO bad about being old, anyway? You couldn't PAY me to be a teenager again. I'm 28. I'm looking forward to getting older.

bethany
03-06-2009, 02:44 AM
Is Old. McNorth, I love you, you grey headed sasquatch.

traininvain
03-06-2009, 02:52 AM
Haha, North, you are the best.

I am 22, clearly an old geezer lady on the brink of death. I've already started collecting cats so I can be crazy old cat lady.

bethany
03-06-2009, 02:53 AM
Haha, North, you are the best.

I am 22, clearly an old geezer lady on the brink of death. I've already started collecting cats so I can be crazy old cat lady.

Gives train a kitten.

Sage
03-06-2009, 02:54 AM
I am ancient then, train, at 28

eyeblink
03-06-2009, 03:04 AM
I hope so. I'm 44. I'm not published as a YA writer or indeed as a novelist, though I am as a short-fiction writer.

At least two YA authors I can think of were older than I am now when their debut novels were published - the late Siobhan Dowd was 46 and Meg Rosoff was 48. So I live in hope. :) With the admission that their FIRST novels were published long ago, Melvin Burgess (for example) is 54 and Aidan Chambers is 74. So, never too old!

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 03:12 AM
This made me laugh. I was also wondering when somebody would start a thread like this. Hooray for all of us still in touch with our inner teens.... and in possession of enough distance to see those years with a little extra clarity!

I'm Kirsten, age 25.... nice to meet you, grown-ups.

peachiemkey
03-06-2009, 03:14 AM
:D
teens are the minority, though! you people are going to overtake us in a second.

possible thread suggestions:
precious preteens writing for teens
tasty twenties writing for teens
flirty thirties writing for teens
fiery forties writing for teens
fierce fifties plus writing for teens

timewaster
03-06-2009, 03:16 AM
At least two YA authors I can think of were older than I am now when their debut novels were published - the late Siobhan Dowd was 46 and Meg Rosoff was 48. So I live in hope. :) With the admission that their FIRST novels were published long ago, Melvin Burgess (for example) is 54 and Aidan Chambers is 74. So, never too old![/quote]

I'm 48 I've published eight teen novels and I am one of the youngest of my teen writer friends. I was a bit shocked actually at how many of us writing for teens are actually middle aged women with teens and grown up children of our own. Age is not a barrier : )

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 03:18 AM
Here are three amusing posts from John Scalzi's blog I've been wanting to link to. This seems like the perfect place -- they'd get me crucified in the other thread. I'm not saying I agree with every one of his points, but... interesting stuff. What do you guys think?


10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2006/04/27/10-things-teenage-writers-should-know-about-writing/)

On Teens, and the Fact That Their Writing Sucks (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)

Emo: Older Than You Think (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2008/12/10/emo-older-than-you-think/)

reenkam
03-06-2009, 03:20 AM
mcnorth.

you are made of so much win, you could give it away daily and still have more than anyone else.

bethany
03-06-2009, 03:25 AM
Oh look. It's geriatric Reen, eating all the cupcakes.

Mumut
03-06-2009, 03:26 AM
I was 61 when my first novel was published. I've now one foot in the grave and one on a banana skin, so this is my thread!

reenkam
03-06-2009, 03:34 AM
Oh look. It's geriatric Reen, eating all the cupcakes.

*waves cane*

you come back here bethany and i'll show you what my maw said about cupcakes back in 1852!

bethany
03-06-2009, 03:37 AM
Here are three amusing posts from John Scalzi's blog I've been wanting to link to. This seems like the perfect place -- they'd get me crucified in the other thread. I'm not saying I agree with every one of his points, but... interesting stuff. What do you guys think?

10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2006/04/27/10-things-teenage-writers-should-know-about-writing/)
On Teens, and the Fact That Their Writing Sucks (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)
Emo: Older Than You Think (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2008/12/10/emo-older-than-you-think/)

Haven't read these in detail, yet, but I think that it's just as narrow minded to lump all young writers together as it is to lump together black writers or women writers or whatever. Obviously there will be some ways in which they can be compared, just like the black writers or the women might be compared. One among many factors.

But age doesn't equal ability, nor does it equal experience. I looked into the face of a kid today who had experienced more grief than I have experienced in my life (of over 30 years). And I've read work by teenagers that blew me away. Including but not limited to members of our own AW.

Esopha
03-06-2009, 03:46 AM
Here are three amusing posts from John Scalzi's blog I've been wanting to link to. This seems like the perfect place -- they'd get me crucified in the other thread. I'm not saying I agree with every one of his points, but... interesting stuff. What do you guys think?


10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2006/04/27/10-things-teenage-writers-should-know-about-writing/)

On Teens, and the Fact That Their Writing Sucks (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)

Emo: Older Than You Think (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2008/12/10/emo-older-than-you-think/)


I see your links and raise you two of my own.

I would answer coherently but my thoughts on Mr. Scalzi's opinions are not suitable for polite conversation.

Interview with Hannah Moskowitz (http://kristin-briana.livejournal.com/9020.html)

My previous blog on the subject. (http://yappingaboutyoungadult.blogspot.com/2008/02/young-writers-tumultuous-teenage-years.html)

I am currently reblogging about the subject, because it's come up in my life again. So in about a day or two you'll have a slightly spicier rant.

Note: I am no longer 16. I am currently 17. Also -- "Meggy" in the comments stream of that blog is a 15 year-old agented writer, and Madeleine (another Muser who is around here somewhere) is sixteen and agented.

I dislike it when people insult my friends, however indirectly.

So Mr. Scalzi.

Tsk. Tsk.

Eta: And here's another bitchy nugget. Don't insult your target audience.

Kathleen42
03-06-2009, 03:49 AM
30 here. Good to know I'm not the only one old enough to remember the original Degrassi.

Sage
03-06-2009, 04:14 AM
Or the original Saved By The Bell?

donut
03-06-2009, 04:23 AM
OMG ORIGINAL DEGRASSI YES.

Joey Jeremiah, my heart belongs to you.

Sage
03-06-2009, 04:25 AM
Here are three amusing posts from John Scalzi's blog I've been wanting to link to. This seems like the perfect place -- they'd get me crucified in the other thread. I'm not saying I agree with every one of his points, but... interesting stuff. What do you guys think?

10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2006/04/27/10-things-teenage-writers-should-know-about-writing/)
On Teens, and the Fact That Their Writing Sucks (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)
Emo: Older Than You Think (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2008/12/10/emo-older-than-you-think/)
I didn't read the other two, but the emo post was actually pretty good once you got past the first few paragraphs "justifying" the post

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 04:36 AM
Esopha, I checked out your posts. Here are some of my half-coherent thoughts, if you want to hear 'em. I think we're in agreement in many ways.

So basically, I believe that Scalzi's points apply to most -- but not all -- teen writers. I would put most 40-year-olds who have been writing two years in the same category.

I was a creative writing major at a pretty highly ranked university, and I workshopped with hundreds of writers, teenage and post-teenage, most of them "serious" enough to pay tens of thousands of dollars to major in writing. I've also worked as a writing tutor, and an editor for websites and a magazine. And just judging from my sampling size, the vast majority of so-called serious writers, teens AND adults, have years and years to go before they're ready to be published. I think any agent or publisher would say the same.

RE: the "life experience" factor you addressed in your blog post. While I don't think it should be dismissed as a valuable writing tool, it's definitely true that a 50-year-old with ultra-intense life experiences -- say, fighting in wars, deaths of loved ones, poverty, etc. -- might write total crap, while a incredibly gifted 16-year-old like Hannah can write stunning prose.

HOWEVER: there are other life experiences amassed in the post-teen era that help help a writer grow exponentially, though most people can't see this until they're on the other side, looking back. I'm talking college education, extra years of voracious reading, and in my case, years of working as a professional freelance writer and editor. Of course, not every author has a college degree, or worked as a journalist (or teacher, or librarian, etc.) But inarguably, a 16-year-old hasn't had the same amount of time to read as a 50-year-old. And reading is the best education for a writer, hands-down.

Like Bethany said, blindly lumping any group together is wrong. But who can argue that most teens (and adults) are truly writing publishworthy stuff? The viewpoint that all teen (and adult!) writers are on the same level is insulting to somebody like Hannah, (or S.E. Hinton! or Nabokov! or McCarthy!) who is an exception to a general rule, not proof the rule is wrong.

This is where I have to agree with Scalzi (see point 3). (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)

I also have to say I think AW is skewed waaaay above the mean when it comes to teenage writing talent. Just that its teenage members are serious enough to locate and participate in this forum in the first place is considerable. I mean this as a huge compliment. I wish to God I had you people around when I was a teenage writer.

holy crap this post is loooong, sorry

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 04:38 AM
I didn't read the other two, but the emo post was actually pretty good once you got past the first few paragraphs "justifying" the post

hahaha agreed, this guy's so used to flamewars.

also: original Saved by the Bell for the win!! I used to watch 2 hours of rerruns every day after school... anyone else remember the TBS/WGN overlap?

Edit: unless by "original", you're talking about Good Morning Miss Bliss. lol.

RoseColoredSkies
03-06-2009, 04:59 AM
Not to veer off track with the current topic, but I had another (possibly less stres-worthy) topic of discussion.

What makes you want to write YA novels?

For me, my current novel (in editing and shortly off for round one with the betas) is the first YA fiction I've done. I've written a few other novels that haven't been published and I didn't really think about who they would be marketed to.

But now that I've come across AW and am taking more seriously the publishing process (and the agent-getting process for that matter) I realize now the importance of knowing your audience.

I have another YA plotline in mind that will hopefully get written after the other novel idea in my head gets out. I swear, the sodding plot bunnies have just deicded to attack in full force!

Zoombie
03-06-2009, 05:11 AM
Shady is like my hero.

Don't tell her that I said that.

Smish
03-06-2009, 05:27 AM
Or the original Saved By The Bell?

And Kids Incorporated :) Even as a kid, I knew it was totally lame, but I loved it!

karo.ambrose
03-06-2009, 05:35 AM
*is old*

And North rules.

So "teens writing for teens" is to "twifty" as "old people writing for teens" is to... "olpfty"?

*is an olpfty*

reenkam
03-06-2009, 05:48 AM
Or the original Saved By The Bell?

There's a non-original Saved By The Bell?????

Sage
03-06-2009, 06:00 AM
SBtB: The New Class

Also there's the SBtB: The College Years

Of course, SBtB is a weird show because the original original series was a completely different show called Good Morning, Miss Bliss, with Zack, Lisa, Screech, and Mr. Belding, but everything that happens there is completely ignored in the high school and later SBtB, even contradicted by it.

Shady Lane
03-06-2009, 06:16 AM
mcnorth.

you are made of so much win, you could give it away daily and still have more than anyone else.


qft


this thread ftw

Shady Lane
03-06-2009, 07:15 AM
:D

C.bronco
03-06-2009, 07:15 AM
For the old people... who write for teens.
I am an old person, and it has been two years since I have written for teens...


Luckily, I remember being one. That helps.

C.bronco
03-06-2009, 07:16 AM
Shady is spectating. Is that a verb?

Smish
03-06-2009, 07:36 AM
qft


this thread ftw

See, I clearly belong in the old folks thread because I have no idea what qft or ftw stand for...

Going to wash my face and dab on the anti-wrinkle eye cream now...

Sage
03-06-2009, 09:03 AM
quoted for truth

for the win


The teen Musers taught me ;)

Red.Ink.Rain
03-06-2009, 09:57 AM
Age is but a number. :D

Glenakin
03-06-2009, 10:08 AM
Here are three amusing posts from John Scalzi's blog I've been wanting to link to. This seems like the perfect place -- they'd get me crucified in the other thread. I'm not saying I agree with every one of his points, but... interesting stuff. What do you guys think?

10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2006/04/27/10-things-teenage-writers-should-know-about-writing/)
On Teens, and the Fact That Their Writing Sucks (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2007/06/18/on-teens-and-the-fact-their-writing-sucks/)
Emo: Older Than You Think (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2008/12/10/emo-older-than-you-think/)

Yeah i saw this. Got a lot of flamming from young writers.


Haven't read these in detail, yet, but I think that it's just as narrow minded to lump all young writers together as it is to lump together black writers or women writers or whatever. Obviously there will be some ways in which they can be compared, just like the black writers or the women might be compared. One among many factors.

But age doesn't equal ability, nor does it equal experience. I looked into the face of a kid today who had experienced more grief than I have experienced in my life (of over 30 years). And I've read work by teenagers that blew me away. Including but not limited to members of our own AW.

Actually most of what he says in the article is right. If you read it all you'll see that he wasn't "lumping" young writers together. He did say that there are some really good young writers but it's rare. And it is.

No offence to teen writers.

eyeblink
03-06-2009, 11:02 AM
quoted for truth

for the win




I've also learned this in the last year or so. I used to think ftw meant something far ruder - but then I do remember the punk era. :)

As to what makes a fortysomething like me want to write YA... Many of my published short stories and unpublished novels feature 17-21 year olds (i.e. sixth form and university [UK]/high school and college [US] age), but weren't published as YA. (I know college-age is stretching the definition of YA but bear with me.) I clearly do feel driven to write about people in that age range. I may well have emotional unfinished business from that age - I suspect I do, for reasons I won't go into here.

I'm not saying I haven't changed since I was seventeen or eighteen, as I clearly have - I'm a lot less shy for example and I've had to overcome some serious self-esteem issues. But looking back, there seems to be a dividing line in my life. My seventeen-year-self seems to be, for better or worse, at the beginning of a continuity that ends with me now. My sixteen-and-younger self seems like a different person in the same body. I don't know why this is.

I agree with Scalzi that I don't think the experience of being a teenager has changed since I was one, or indeed for longer than that. Surface details, like slang, and tastes in music, cinema, TV etc, do change over time but those are things you can research. (I don't agree with the idea that teenagers are ONLY interested in what's new and trendy. When I was 18 I was swapping with friends tapes (yes, cassette tapes, remember them) of Dylan and Beatles LPs originally released when I was a toddler. I'm sure this still goes on - one regular poster here is a 19-year-old Jefferson Airplane fan. In fact, with the Internet, it's probably easier to get into older music than it was - I remember wanting to hear certain songs I'd heard about, and waiting for them to turn up on the radio.)

I'm not a teenager any more, and I don't pretend to be one in my day-to-day life - that would be very sad. I can't claim that my teenage years were the happiest of my life - in some respects they were anything but. However I do remember what it was like being a teenager: memory, observation and imagination are the important things if you want to write about it effectively.

Nakhlasmoke
03-06-2009, 11:23 AM
OH HAI

My spiritual home!

*is ancient and decrepit and drinks a lot*

*waves walking stick*

Get off my lawn you little gobshites!

Red.Ink.Rain
03-06-2009, 12:33 PM
Glenakin and bethany -

I think the flaming goes both ways. It's like, if you're really old - you shouldn't be a bestselling author, because you should retire. If you're young, you have no life experiences, so you should wait until you're an official adult and you have all sorts of Knowledge and Wisdom and Grammar Skillz.

I think there are a lot more exceptions to both of these rules than people think. I'm an instructor on a teen writing site, and MAN - there are some incredible 16-year-old authors out there. I was recently blown away when critiquing a 13-year-old's piece. Like, I had to go look at her profile - and then look at it again - and then look at it again...

On the flip side of the coin, Madeleine L'Engle was writing YA up until she died at age - what - 89? And yet in today's world a woman at that age would be told that she should be knitting or something...not writing books for *gasp* TEENAGERS.

In my opinion ageism is all over the place, and it's not just young writers. It's unpublished writers and older writers and single-mom-writers and writers-with-other-full-time-jobs... I feel like people assume that it's not just YOUNG writers who suck - it's people in general who say they want to be writers.

I read those particular articles when I was about 16, and personally, they didn't offend me. Because I've always been determined to be an exception. That doesn't mean I'll be a teen author - but it does mean I'll always keep telling myself that I can do this. I think that's important for any age to remember.

*rant over*

Sorry to hijack the old-people's thread. :P

timewaster
03-06-2009, 12:38 PM
[quote=eyeblink;3362299]I've also learned this in the last year or so. I used to think ftw meant something far ruder - but then I do remember the punk era. :)

As to what makes a fortysomething like me want to write YA... Many of my published short stories and unpublished novels feature 17-21 year olds (i.e. sixth form and university [UK]/high school and college [US] age), but weren't published as YA. (I know college-age is stretching the definition of YA but bear with me.) I clearly do feel driven to write about people in that age range. I may well have emotional unfinished business from that age - I suspect I do, for reasons I won't go into here.

I write for teens because it is fun.
You can explore ideas more easily and are not as hide bound by genre restrictions.
I like the discipline of it, the focus on story and pace, the need for clarity.

I don't actually think much about what teens want when I write because the category is a marketing one for me.

Back in the day once we outgrew children's books we read adult ones so I read a mix of children's and adults from about ten onwards. Kids are no different now so I don't feel the need to be simplistic, or to dumb down, neither do I try to be deliberately edgy or too conservative: I write what interests me from the viewpoint of a younger person. Teens are resilient and mentally flexible, you can put fictional teenagers in all kind of situations which would be implausible for an adult. There are few things that you can't do, as long as you can make the story work.

I have four teenage kids ( actually not quite true the eldest just turned twenty) so I'm not completely out of touch, but even as a teen I was never that in touch.

I mainly write for teens because editors for that group have, in the past, liked my books and I have liked writing them.

Leila
03-06-2009, 02:26 PM
I was wondering if someone would start a thread like this eventually...

I'm 23 in a few weeks and I have a stepdaughter and two cats, so I'm assuming I count as 'old'. Although I often feel like a kid masquerading as a grown up. Sure, I work full time and pay bills and vote and the rest of it, but I don't feel grown up. Ever. I've just gotten better at pretending to be. I sometimes wonder if everyone else has managed it and I haven't, or if they're all pretending too.

I write YA because at heart I'm still 14 years old and confused, because I'm disillusioned with most contemporary fiction for adults, because I write emotions strong and sharp edged, because the characters who wander into my head are often young, and because I love it and read it more than anything else (helps that I work in a children's bookshop :)). I refer to what I write as YA these days, but I think that my writing had been YA long before I started calling it that.

sharpierae
03-06-2009, 04:49 PM
I write YA because I like tight storytelling. Even with complicated stories, the telling needs to be streamlined to the essential so it just MOVES. I'm always so entertained when some people dismiss it as "only YA" or "writing for kids" like it's easy. We write for a more demanding audience! And I like the challenge.

I also think there's more room to experiment in YA than adult. (1st person/present, anyone? and what are they called... novels written in verse!?) I'm personally not interested in writing or reading those, but young readers can be more open to stuff adult readers think of as weird. I don't know about you, but I find all those possibilities super exciting.

Also, I'm more interested in the kinds of stories that come about when writing from a teenage character's POV. They're more likely to question the world around them, take risks, believe in things intensely. I just think that age of discovery and working out how to be/act is so INTERESTING.

I write YA because it's FUN!

kaitlin008
03-06-2009, 05:43 PM
I write YA because I like writing about the age group. I like writing about older teens - 17 or 18 or so - because it's an interesting age. I couldn't pinpoint exactly why I tend to like writing YA, but I think I like writing about characters who sometimes try to be more mature than they actually are. Your teen years are a time when you're coming into your own, and it can be very awkward. Especially if you then thrust them into situations that no normal teenager would ever face. Maybe there's also a part of me that misses being a teenager. Though I think it's a very, very small part.

And to the articles. I know a lot of teenagers who are awesome writers. But I also think he makes some good points. I don't think anyone should give up on their dream just because they're 'too young', but I think it's always important to remember that you don't always know as much as you think you do. I thought his post about emo was the best - teens do always think they're so different from the generation before, and they're not. I wasn't a teen that long ago, and I remember. I thought I knew everything, I thought my parents were always wrong. I'm still that way a little, to be honest. I'm more mature now by leaps and bounds than when I was 16, but every time I age, I look back on the year before and think, 'wow, I wasn't as smart as I thought'. It'll probably be that way for the rest of my life, but at least it gets less and less as time goes on. It's probably just useful to remember that if you're a good writer and you're a teenager, just imagine how amazing of a writer you'll end up. That's what I like to tell myself, at least, because I may have left my teenage years behind me, but I still have a lot of life left, so I still have a lot of time to improve.

The Grump
03-06-2009, 07:58 PM
[quote=Clair Dickson;3360931]My husband's 98 year old grandfather refuses to use a cane because canes are for old people and he's not old. =)]

Sounds like my dad at 102. Guess that tells us the symbols are more important than the reality. Of course, if he can still walk without it. My dad was climbing trees (to prune) when in his late 90s.

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 08:09 PM
My seventeen-year-self seems to be, for better or worse, at the beginning of a continuity that ends with me now. My sixteen-and-younger self seems like a different person in the same body.

This is beautifully put, and when I think about it, I feel the same way.

As for why I write YA, here's my answer from an earlier thread: I'm 25. I write YA because I simply have more experience being a young adult than being an adult. Plus, I just love the genre-bending qualities of YA, and its ultra-enthusiastic audience.

Mostly, though, I just love writing about characters who are still so new to certain freedoms, and relationships, and other things that become usual once you're an adult. Being a teenager is so exciting. Sure, it can suck too. But at that age, the world is just starting to burst open with possibility. You begin to realize your own power. And it's so, so, so exciting... you realize it even more in retrospect. That's why I write YA.

wandergirl
03-06-2009, 08:10 PM
Yeah...I write it because I feel it at heart too. In fact, my most recent wip is middle grade. I think I'm regressing. I am only about 10 inside. Soon I suppose I will be writing picture books.

you're a literary benjamin button!!

JamieB
03-06-2009, 09:25 PM
Soon to be 35 and feeling it. Man, trying to stay up past 9:30 to write just about kills me. :)

I like writing about teens because it's such a great time without (much) worry about paying bills, keeping kids in line, getting the house pressure washed and all of that dull adult STUFF. Plus, the sexual tension runs rampant with new, young relationships.

What a great time... *sheds a tear while strolling along memory lane*

Metaphor
03-06-2009, 10:04 PM
*is a teen*

*will thread-crash this once then go back to the teens*


The Teens Writing for Teens thread has like 5,000 posts or something. I'm not sure we can catch up :)

You will never catch up!

I guess it depends if you talk about totally random stuff like what you're having for dinner, and hot boys and have parties like us.


Eventually, they'll age out of their thread... and will have to join ours. So, we just need to be patient. We'll eventually overtake them :)

Yes but you'll all be dying. Because you're OLD. :D



So "teens writing for teens" is to "twifty" as "old people writing for teens" is to... "olpfty"?

*is an olpfty*

Olpfty? Twifties are better :D

/thread-crashing

eyeblink
03-06-2009, 10:17 PM
This is beautifully put, and when I think about it, I feel the same way.

As for why I write YA, here's my answer from an earlier thread: I'm 25. I write YA because I simply have more experience being a young adult than being an adult. Plus, I just love the genre-bending qualities of YA, and its ultra-enthusiastic audience.



Thank you. I agree with what you say as well.

Something else I like are the fact that I don't have to pad a novel out to 100k+ words if it isn't warranted, as you increasingly have to do with novels. I started reading adult SF in the late 70s and back then authors were rarely ALLOWED to exceed 70k. Nowadays, they are rarely allowed to come in under 100k. There's a place for the sprawling epic, but there's a case for the perfect miniature as well. Many of my favourite writers are miniaturists (a MG/YA example would be Alan Garner - even his two adult novels are under 60,000 words each.) I'm someone who tends to write shorter rather than longer, so if I write a novel that comes in at 50,000 words I would still stand a chance of selling it.

Rosa
03-06-2009, 10:26 PM
I'm just starting out on writing and I'm 51 years young! I have two adult Children and three grandchildren! Your only as old as you feel, some day I feel young and some day I feel my age lol.

~grace~
03-06-2009, 11:20 PM
I WANT TO BE A CURMUDGEON CAN I BE A CURMUDGEON PLEEEEEEAAAASSEEEE????

ETA I even have a bad knee!

Zoombie
03-06-2009, 11:31 PM
Curmudgeon is the best kind of Mudgeon out there.

Way better than the Murmudgeon.

stormie
03-06-2009, 11:35 PM
Hey, I marched twenty--count 'em, twenty--blocks in a parade in 30 degree F. weather with a wind chill coming off the water. My knees did just fine, thank you! A little rest, a little Ibuprofin.... And my upper arm didn't jiggle (much) when I waved to the crowds.

Then again, I was wearing three layers of clothes, warm boots, wool gloves, and fur earmuffs to keep warm while the teenage Parade Queen and her court wore strapless gowns with only a shoulder covering of some sort. Or a coat draped just so over their shoulders.

They looked lovely and I looked--um, older.

whatevergoesnow
03-06-2009, 11:45 PM
22 and my knees are starting to creak. I'm moving in with y'all!:partyguy:

stormie
03-06-2009, 11:49 PM
Well, you aren't a teen anymore so...welcome to the crowd that limps, burps, knows every anti-wrinkle cream, and reads the obits first thing in the morning. :hi:

Smish
03-07-2009, 01:35 AM
quoted for truth

for the win


The teen Musers taught me ;)

Ah, thanks :)

I just got a Facebook request to join the page set up for my ten-year high school reunion. It's going to be very strange seeing people from high school. I moved away for college and grad school and just recently moved back to the area. I wish I hadn't moved back so I could have a decent excuse to blow it off ;)

Is it weird that I have no interest in seeing people from my teenage years? What's wrong with me??

wandergirl
03-07-2009, 02:03 AM
Is it weird that I have no interest in seeing people from my teenage years? What's wrong with me??

No. Nothing. You just know that no matter where everyone is in their life, how well-adjusted, how successful, most of them will fall right back into their old niches.

Do you think you'd feel different, though, if facebook and myspace didn't exist? There's very little mystery left anymore.

Smish
03-07-2009, 02:23 AM
No. Nothing. You just know that no matter where everyone is in their life, how well-adjusted, how successful, most of them will fall right back into their old niches.

Do you think you'd feel different, though, if facebook and myspace didn't exist? There's very little mystery left anymore.

You know, that's true. Because of Facebook, I've already seen pictures of their kids, heard about graduations, etc. There are a few people I'd like to see, who I haven't seen or heard anything about since graduation, but like me, they moved away. I wonder if they'll come to the reunion.

Part of my issue may be that I don't have a niche to fall into. I was always sort of friends with anyone I liked, regardless of clique, and never had a specific group I spent all my time with. I was in the band, so I hung out with band kids. I had a job, so I hung out with kids I worked with. I dated a football player, so I went to the popular kids' parties. My favorite parties, however, were the geek parties: they'd make super-duper potato guns and hang out in an old river bed with high walls (the river didn't exist anymore because it was dammed up to form a lake)... the geeky guys were lots of fun :)

Anyway, I'm old now...

Juneluv12
03-07-2009, 02:30 AM
Yea! I'm glad to see this thread since the twenty-nine year old me felt totally ostracized by the "Teens Writing for Teens" thread. I've wanted to introduce myself on the boards, but the stupid part of me felt like there was this "clique" going on just like in high school!!! The irony in that is hilarious that even though I feel old(I'll be thirty in June), I still have the same loveablly neurotic tendacies I did when I was a teenager.

For me, I've been teaching teenagers for eight years. It's like I never really left the mindset. . I taught middle school six year, and now I teach high school. I'm immersed in the drama on a daily basis. I guess you could say I'm the semi-cool teacher with the sense of humor!

Funnily enough a couple years ago I got accused of trying to be young because a disgruntled student(just kidding) found out I had a Myspace. I jokingly said I didn't know I needed a walker and Depends yet!!!

The YA book I wrote kind of came out of no where after I wrote an Epic Depression era novel. I'm hoping the YA book will stretch into several because it was such a different mindset than the other. Plus it was a much better playlist I got to listen to on the iPod while I was writing!!!

Anyway, just wanted to give a shout out to all the oldsters on here.

kaitlin008
03-07-2009, 02:50 AM
Is it weird that I've never had a myspace page? I do have facebook, though. My college was one of the earlier ones to have it, and I remember being so excited as more and more colleges got added. I hate how it's got all these applications now, though. I'm constantly getting all these requests to join some random application I don't want.

It sure makes stalking people I went to high school with easy, though ;)

lm728
03-07-2009, 04:33 AM
Old people writing for teens? Looks like the TWFT thread has some competition.

But you old geezers (yeah, you, the 20-yo reading this) will never catch up to our superly amazingly awesome thread (third most-replied thread in YA). Nuh-uh. We use the TWFT thread as more of a chat forum/for off-subject rants.

And besides, we're the twifties. You guys are the opwft peeps. We win; better name.

Take that, opwufts.

wandergirl
03-07-2009, 04:46 AM
Take that, opwufts.

looks like we big kids got ourselves a flamer ;)

whatevergoesnow
03-07-2009, 04:51 AM
Old people writing for teens? Looks like the TWFT thread has some competition.

But you old geezers (yeah, you, the 20-yo reading this) will never catch up to our superly amazingly awesome thread (third most-replied thread in YA). Nuh-uh. We use the TWFT thread as more of a chat forum/for off-subject rants.

And besides, we're the twifties. You guys are the opwft peeps. We win; better name.

Take that, opwufts.


:D Yeah... I smell a challenge :e2fight:

peachiemkey
03-07-2009, 04:53 AM
Aw, be nice, fellow teens. I can't wait to grow up and join the OPWTs...
well, maybe give me a few years. :D I still haven't had my Defining Teenage Experiences. *will probably never have them*

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:01 AM
Aw, be nice, fellow teens. I can't wait to grow up and join the OPWTs...
well, maybe give me a few years. :D I still haven't had my Defining Teenage Experiences. *will probably never have them*

Haha...you mean OPWFTs. Opwufts.

You're gonna join the Opwufts sooner than I will. Besides another Twiftie (forget who), I'll be the next-to-last to join.

wandergirl
03-07-2009, 05:02 AM
I still haven't had my Defining Teenage Experiences. *will probably never have them*

they're not always what you'd expect them to be.

receiving first kiss at age 13: slimy
missing both proms: blehh
getting my license at age 16: moderately thrilling
splashing in the ocean at night under the fireworks on the last day of the fair at ages 15, 16 & 17: priceless

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:04 AM
they're not always what you'd expect them to be.

receiving first kiss at age 13: slimy
missing both proms: blehh
getting my license at age 16: moderately thrilling
splashing in the ocean at night under the fireworks on the last day of the fair at ages 15, 16 & 17: priceless

My defining teenage experiences so far:

none to list.

Though being able to drive will be fun. I won't have to pay my mom 10 bucks every time I want her to shuttle me to the mall.

everythinginblak
03-07-2009, 05:14 AM
Lol. I'm gonna be nineteen this year. I don't really consider myself a 'teen' anymore. For one, I'm married, and I have a son on the way and a stepdaughter. So, I feel old. In about two more years though, I will be 21...and I guess I will have officially 'graduated' from my 'teen' status then. :P

Smish
03-07-2009, 05:16 AM
My defining teenage experiences so far:

none to list.

Though being able to drive will be fun. I won't have to pay my mom 10 bucks every time I want her to shuttle me to the mall.

$10 for a ride to the mall?? Can you take the bus?

I remember being so happy to get my license... until two weeks later when I had my first ticket and then my first visit to traffic school ;)

whatevergoesnow
03-07-2009, 05:18 AM
$10 for a ride to the mall?? Can you take the bus?

I remember being so happy to get my license... until two weeks later when I had my first ticket and then my first visit to traffic school ;)

I remember sleeping through traffic school. Seriously, how boring was that?

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:19 AM
$10 for a ride to the mall?? Can you take the bus?

I remember being so happy to get my license... until two weeks later when I had my first ticket and then my first visit to traffic school ;)


Nope, no buses in little old tampa. It's tinier than you think. I used to take the bus in los angeles. I swear, there was a stop on every street corner.

"It's gas money," my mom always explains. Like a gallon or two of gas costs 10 bucks.

I can't wait to get a car. Either my mom's lexus hybrid as a hand-me-down, or the audi TT. It is the most gorgeous car ever; I'm hoping to get one in red.

Smish
03-07-2009, 05:19 AM
I remember sleeping through traffic school. Seriously, how boring was that?

Yeah... I've slept through it three times. lol.

everythinginblak
03-07-2009, 05:21 AM
^ Psssssssh. I used to live in Florida-and I have visited Tampa...and it is by no means little lol. I think Jacksonville is bigger though ( I grew up there for a loooooong time ). I love the malls in tampa-i think its cool that there are movie theaters right inside.

Smish
03-07-2009, 05:24 AM
Nope, no buses in little old tampa. It's tinier than you think. I used to take the bus in los angeles. I swear, there was a stop on every street corner.

"It's gas money," my mom always explains. Like a gallon or two of gas costs 10 bucks.

I can't wait to get a car. Either my mom's lexus hybrid as a hand-me-down, or the audi TT. It is the most gorgeous car ever; I'm hoping to get one in red.

Wow. I'm completely surprised there's absolutely no public transportation system. However, you get to live in Florida, so I'm not feeling too sorry for ya :)

everythinginblak
03-07-2009, 05:32 AM
Times must be changing. I went to Tampa back in 2003...and I swear I swa public transportation. However, my dad used to work for a blind company in Jacksonville and we had to travel everywhere in florida-especially Orlando....and not once dide I ever see a bus system there. And Palm Coast, fl is tiny and they dont have taxis or buses. but they do have a beach :D and a huge town center now.




*really needs to go back home to florida*

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:41 AM
ummmm

the TWFT thread has some competition? really?

do you twifties understand what the RM thread is? and how long it's been here and how long it IS?

and how "musers" is actually a word that doesn't sound stupid?


basically:

you are not quite the shit you think you are, twifties. like, I'm glad you've found your home on the internet and are writing and stuff, I'm all for that woo woo but you're basically a smaller, younger version of RM.

so yeah, carry on and all that.

but seriously.


Haha. I was being sarcastic; I thought I was being clear. If you didn't pick it up, then I apologize.

Um. I put "third-most-replied-thread on YA". The first being Musings--I acknowledge that Random Musings is most popular--and second being...something else, gotta go check. Think it was either Shady's Edgy YA or What YA Book are You Reading Now?.

"basically a younger version of RM"--RM was started by provrb1810meggy, albeit a one or two years ago. She's 16--a teen, probably even younger than some on the TWFT thread.

basically:

That was a burn.

everythinginblak
03-07-2009, 05:45 AM
Touchy, touchieeeeeeeee.

*will give out tampons for those who need them*

:D

~grace~
03-07-2009, 05:45 AM
Voice Game is the other one.



And maybe you were joking, but I'm in general getting a non-jokey vibe from that thread in the same vein. Maybe I'm getting old...

also, don't apologize to me because I didn't understand you. I find it annoying.

*grouches away*

Esopha
03-07-2009, 05:46 AM
If you're old, does that make us a May/December relationship?

And since you're the one with the job, does that make me a gold digger?

Damn.

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:48 AM
Voice Game is the other one.



And maybe you were joking, but I'm in general getting a non-jokey vibe from that thread in the same vein. Maybe I'm getting old...

also, don't apologize to me because I didn't understand you. I find it annoying.

*grouches away*


Then...I'm not sorry?


I did not apologize for you not understanding me. I apologized for not being concise enough.

~grace~
03-07-2009, 05:48 AM
you're a playboy bunny to my old creepy guy, soph

Calista to my Harrison

Anna Nicole to my whatever his name was

peachiemkey
03-07-2009, 05:48 AM
grace, the musers thread is in its own league, trust me. i mean, it actually is a sticky. hahaha

i'm almost 16 and i still haven't had my first non-party kiss. i write about them plenty, though. ;]

Esopha
03-07-2009, 05:49 AM
you're a playboy bunny to my old creepy guy, soph

Calista to my Harrison

Anna Nicole to my whatever his name was

Drew Barrymore to your Hugh Grant!

*has watched Music and Lyrics far far far far too many times*

eta: But DAMN I will be your Calista.

everythinginblak
03-07-2009, 05:49 AM
*still has those tampons*

Katura
03-07-2009, 05:53 AM
Eventually, they'll age out of their thread... and will have to join ours. So, we just need to be patient. We'll eventually overtake them

:roll: We (the Twifties) were just discussing this...it's nice to know that there will be somewhere to go after "teendom" ^__^

*Grabs tilt and drags her back to TWFT* Leave the nice people alone now deary. *Waves* See you guys in a couple of years!

lm728
03-07-2009, 05:55 AM
:roll: We (the Twifties) were just discussing this...it's nice to know that there will be somewhere to go after "teendom" ^__^

*Grabs tilt and drags her back to TWFT* Leave the nice people alone now deary. *Waves* See you guys in a couple years!

Oh dear. I may have just come across as a rabid dog foaming at the mouth.

Then I'll let y'all be.

Barb D
03-07-2009, 08:50 AM
I'm the MOM of teens. Does that count for anything? I was in my 30s when I had them, so yes, I am truly old. Ish.

My grandparents are 96 and 94, and want to have their memorial service on their 75th anniversary in June, so that they'll be there to hear what people say. :)

wandergirl
03-07-2009, 09:16 AM
My grandparents are 96 and 94, and want to have their memorial service on their 75th anniversary in June, so that they'll be there to hear what people say. :)

that is such a sweet idea.

karo.ambrose
03-07-2009, 09:45 AM
I quote my MS because I'm coolio like that. That's right, we old people can say hip and groovy words just like you kids. Fo sho.


They (the teens) charged at us with hateful sneers, skateboards raised and ready to hurt, or perhaps even kill the aliens. What in heaven’s name was their problem? Gosh darned bunch of rowdy teens. Back in my day, we treated each other with respect. I just didn’t know what to make of these bitch-ass whippersnappers anymore.

I should be writing right now. Instead I'm just lurking.

Fo sho.

Kathleen42
03-08-2009, 02:39 AM
OMG ORIGINAL DEGRASSI YES.

Joey Jeremiah, my heart belongs to you.

But Joey cheated on Kaytlin! I always liked the Irish guy who had the crush on Spike.

Kathleen42
03-08-2009, 02:42 AM
Not to veer off track with the current topic, but I had another (possibly less stres-worthy) topic of discussion.

What makes you want to write YA novels?

For me, my current novel (in editing and shortly off for round one with the betas) is the first YA fiction I've done. I've written a few other novels that haven't been published and I didn't really think about who they would be marketed to.


I honestly had no intention of writing YA. I did however have this ragtag group of characters who kept popping in and out of my head a couple of times a year over a four or five year period.

After completing my first (adult) book, I couldn't get these characters out of my head. They happened to be in their late teens and their story seemed to fit in more with the YA genre.

Angela_785
03-08-2009, 05:33 PM
Kathleen, it's funny how things turn out, isn't it? My own writing has been all over the map!

Degrassi: Did anyone other than me feel positively ancient when the 'new Degrassi' came out? :(

Gosh, I loved Spike, too! :)

kaitlin008
03-08-2009, 06:04 PM
I didn't even know Degrassi existed until a few months ago. Of course, I don't live in Canada, but I still couldn't believe I'd never known about it. I lived in a cave, I guess :(

Kathleen42
03-08-2009, 06:09 PM
Angela: Totally. I haven't been able to bring myself to watch a single episode of the new series (not even when Kevin Smith and Jason Mewes were on).

Kaitlin: Degrassi is a goodness. A few US stations carried it, but some of the episodes with swearing or controversial subjects were edited. Some of the episodes are on YT.

Kathleen42
03-09-2009, 03:42 AM
Random thought: You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it, yet it seems aspiring authors are willing to dive into a genre without first exploring it.

I think this is especially important for older authors who think they might like to try and write YA. The genre is different than what it was when many of us were teens. Forever is no longer the edgiest kid on the block.

Smish
03-09-2009, 05:25 AM
Random thought: You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it, yet it seems aspiring authors are willing to dive into a genre without first exploring it.

I think this is especially important for older authors who think they might like to try and write YA. The genre is different than what it was when many of us were teens. Forever is no longer the edgiest kid on the block.

Kathleen:

I don't understand that, either. If a person doesn't enjoy reading YA novels (or children's novels, or romance novels, or whatever), they probably shouldn't attempt to write one. Seems like common sense to me!

Kathleen42
03-09-2009, 06:00 AM
Kathleen:

I don't understand that, either. If a person doesn't enjoy reading YA novels (or children's novels, or romance novels, or whatever), they probably shouldn't attempt to write one. Seems like common sense to me!

Of course, I suppose that does improve our own chances. Perhaps we should only encourage them to read the original Sweet Valley Highs.

timewaster
03-09-2009, 12:44 PM
Random thought: You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it, yet it seems aspiring authors are willing to dive into a genre without first exploring it.

I think this is especially important for older authors who think they might like to try and write YA. The genre is different than what it was when many of us were teens. Forever is no longer the edgiest kid on the block.


And you do you think is writing these edgier books? The majority of published authors of teen fiction are 'old' : )

kaitlin008
03-09-2009, 03:55 PM
My sister and I had a book on tape of one of the Sweet Valley books. Whatever they were called when the girls were in middle school (though I think we were probably no older than seven or eight at the time). We used to act it out for our poor mom - we'd play all the characters, just the two of us (or would use stuffed animals if we needed more bodies) and mouth the words along with the tape. My mom must've dreaded it whenever we said we were going to do a performance for her!

Random memory aside, I think it is sort of strange to write a book in a genre you're unfamiliar with if you're not planning to do any research at all into what the genre's about. It also astounds me when people who write say they don't read very much. I guess I always thought it was impossible to love writing if you don't also love reading.

Kathleen42
03-09-2009, 05:58 PM
And you do you think is writing these edgier books? The majority of published authors of teen fiction are 'old' : )

lol very true.

It may just be ageism on my part. I tend to assume that the posts about swearing and sex are coming from older authors who haven't wandered into the teen section since they were one.

Not that I can entirely blame them. Sometimes I wander around the Teen fiction section feeling out of place and wondering if I seem vaguely creepy.

Kathleen42
03-09-2009, 05:59 PM
My sister and I had a book on tape of one of the Sweet Valley books. Whatever they were called when the girls were in middle school (though I think we were probably no older than seven or eight at the time). We used to act it out for our poor mom - we'd play all the characters, just the two of us (or would use stuffed animals if we needed more bodies) and mouth the words along with the tape. My mom must've dreaded it whenever we said we were going to do a performance for her!


I've got that beat. I had the Sweet Valley High board game and made my aunt play it every time she came to the house. Bless her. She never complained about having to find the perfect dress and date.

kaitlin008
03-09-2009, 06:41 PM
Not that I can entirely blame them. Sometimes I wander around the Teen fiction section feeling out of place and wondering if I seem vaguely creepy.
I feel that way too - because in my nearby bookstore, the YA and younger books are downstairs, and the adult books are upstairs. So there's always lots of children there, and it makes me feel awkward.

You can usually tell if older authors haven't got a clue what they're talking about when it comes to teens. The ones who aren't paying attention usually have their teens speaking in a very older way, and using outdated slang and such.

timewaster
03-09-2009, 07:33 PM
I don't think it is about age. You can have teens speaking in an older way if you set the book in an earlier time. Generally it is best not to get too specific with slang unless the book is set in a clear historical period. The trick is to get teens to sound right without using too much slang, which dates incredibly quickly.

I never feel out of place in a book shop!

Everybody has to stay in touch with the market, but it would be a mistake to think that people who write young actually are young. Mostly we're not.

wandergirl
03-09-2009, 09:52 PM
Random thought: You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it, yet it seems aspiring authors are willing to dive into a genre without first exploring it.

I think this is especially important for older authors who think they might like to try and write YA. The genre is different than what it was when many of us were teens. Forever is no longer the edgiest kid on the block.

This is so true. People also tend to thing writing for teens is easier than writing for adults. I know the children's book crowd has to deal with even more of this grief.



Sometimes I wander around the Teen fiction section feeling out of place and wondering if I seem vaguely creepy.


I've been checking out bunches of YA (see this (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=128829)) from the library, but only the last time I went to pick up my holds did the librarian say, "you sure these are yours?" ha. I realize I always carry this ready-made defense in my head -- "I write YA!" I've never had to use it, though.

eyeblink
03-09-2009, 11:46 PM
No-one's ever commehted (yet) when I buy YA novels from a bookshop or take them out of the library. In the latter case, the "teen" shelves are in the adult section, so I very much doubt I'm the only adult taking books from there.

In the case of bookshops, for all they know you could be looking for a present for a child or teenage relative. (I have a nephew aged 16 and a niece aged 12, but I haven't had to use them as excuses yet.)

People who work in places like WH Smiths (a very large UK newsagent/stationers/booksellers chain) have probably seen everything. Someone must buy top-shelf soft porn or the for-women-by-women erotic novels or they wouldn't be there...and if it would be unprofessional and counterproductive to shout out something like "Is it Big Jugs Monthly today, sir?" it would be just as bad as to say "You do realise this book has an 11+ age band on it and you are a long way past eleven?" Embarrassed customers don't come back.

In any case, the real pervs are usually easy enough to spot.

Kathleen42
03-10-2009, 02:27 AM
"You do realise this book has an 11+ age band on it and you are a long way past eleven?" Embarrassed customers don't come back.


That would be hilarious. The clerks at my local bookstore are actually pretty cool and often recommend other YA books for me to check out.

wandergirl
03-11-2009, 11:52 PM
I JUST finished printing out a draft of my novel to revise.... and realized I forgot to put page numbers on it. AAAHHHH

In the name of saving paper, guess I'll be doing it by hand. What's pathetic: I did the same thing last draft, too.

p.s. yes, I've trying to revive this dying thread

Kathleen42
03-11-2009, 11:57 PM
I'll throw in an effort at revival as well:

"Everything I Needed to Know About Being a Girl I Learned from Judy Blume"

How cool would it be to have that big of an impact?

eyeblink
03-11-2009, 11:58 PM
I'm sure we can discuss favourite makes of pipes and slippers if we need to. :)

eyeblink
03-12-2009, 12:01 AM
I'll throw in an effort at revival as well:

"Everything I Needed to Know About Being a Girl I Learned from Judy Blume"

How cool would it be to have that big of an impact?

That would be some responsibility, wouldn't it?

The modern-day equivalent - in the UK at least - would be someone like Jacqueline Wilson, would it? Sells books by the truckload (mostly to teenage girls), has queues a mile long (not too much of an exaggeration) at signings and is one of the most borrowed authors from UK libraries.

RoseColoredSkies
03-12-2009, 12:14 AM
On the revising front, my last novel (07) I printed it out. I didn't page number it because I stuck it in a binder. For some reason I find it easier to edit on the computer (probably because of my eyesight which actually sounds kind of bizarre). Though I didn't have to worry about wasting paper...I used a school printer in one of the labs.

By the way, question for everyone. So in the past, I haven't used betas but I've come to realize their extreme usefulness. They put some distance between you and the story. So the question is, how often to you guys check up with your betas about their progress?

I'm finding it hard not to ask them about their progress (I talk to all 3 of mine on an almost daily basis).

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 12:27 AM
For some reason I find it easier to edit on the computer (probably because of my eyesight which actually sounds kind of bizarre).

I have to force myself to print it, because I know it helps me see the manuscript differently, but it's frustrating not to be able to make instant edits.

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 12:31 AM
So what exactly makes one a grown-up? Turning 18? rarely. Finishing college? Not for everybody. Having babies? That'll do it quick. What are some other, less obvious rites of passage that make us adults?

1) Making -- and KEEPING -- a dentist appointment.

2) Eating spinach on purpose. Because you like it.

3)???

Red.Ink.Rain
03-12-2009, 02:21 AM
So what exactly makes one a grown-up? Turning 18? rarely. Finishing college? Not for everybody. Having babies? That'll do it quick. What are some other, less obvious rites of passage that make us adults?

1) Making -- and KEEPING -- a dentist appointment.

2) Eating spinach on purpose. Because you like it.

3)???

Oh dear. I've been an adult for a while...

RoseColoredSkies
03-12-2009, 02:24 AM
Haha, me too. I love spinach. Been eating it since I was little. I only really get it at home...wouldn't trust spinach here at school if it was the only thing to eat.

Red.Ink.Rain
03-12-2009, 02:28 AM
I'm nineteen, so I'm in a strange place of limbo here - young enough to be dissed by agents (*frustration*), old enough to be paying for college and room and board on my own so I don't feel like I should be.

And now I'm just ranting about stupid stuff that happened too long ago. Lol.

footloose
03-12-2009, 02:29 AM
So what exactly makes one a grown-up? Turning 18? rarely. Finishing college? Not for everybody. Having babies? That'll do it quick. What are some other, less obvious rites of passage that make us adults?


When getting carded while buying booze totally makes your day.

Red.Ink.Rain
03-12-2009, 02:31 AM
Marriage? Paying rent? Scowling at bills on your desk and pretending they're not there?

Glenakin
03-12-2009, 03:04 AM
I have to force myself to print it, because I know it helps me see the manuscript differently, but it's frustrating not to be able to make instant edits.
I only print my 2nd draft for editing. The first draft stays in the computer because I know there's obviously going to be a lot of changes so no need wasting paper

Smish
03-12-2009, 03:09 AM
When getting carded while buying booze totally makes your day.

I haven't gotten to the point where it makes my day, but a few nights ago I was carded at a restaurant, and I was so caught off guard that I dropped my purse, had to gather the contents off the floor, and then spend another five minutes trying to find my ID. It was pretty embarassing :)

black ink
03-12-2009, 03:15 AM
Ooohhh, can I join you??

<pulls up a chair for bingo at the senior citizen rec center>

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 03:29 AM
I haven't gotten to the point where it makes my day, but a few nights ago I was carded at a restaurant, and I was so caught off guard that I dropped my purse, had to gather the contents off the floor, and then spend another five minutes trying to find my ID. It was pretty embarassing :)

Because I'm 25, I'm at the stage just prior to that... where I feel insulted if they DON'T card me.

Smish
03-12-2009, 03:47 AM
Because I'm 25, I'm at the stage just prior to that... where I feel insulted if they DON'T card me.

I think I don't get carded at restaurants much just because I tend to eat out during the week, after work, while wearing my work-appropriate clothes (generally, a suit). I look like a grown-up during the week :)

I did get carded at a rated-R movie just before Christmas. That one really caught me off guard!

Kathleen42
03-12-2009, 04:54 AM
I got carded buying a scratch and win ticket.

adarkfox
03-12-2009, 08:30 AM
I always get carded (23) but my bf never does (20) the only thing I can think of to blame is facial hair which Im not quite old enough to grow naturally yet...

What makes us old fart writers? When your squeezing writing time in between work family and responsibilities cursing yourself for not writing more as a carefree teen. And, in my case, I can't dye my hair crayola reds and blues anymore. Booooo

kaitlin008
03-12-2009, 04:54 PM
I always get carded (23) but my bf never does (20) the only thing I can think of to blame is facial hair which Im not quite old enough to grow naturally yet...
Same here! Except my boyfriend is 22. People who guess his age, though, always think he's close to 30! I think because he's a really big guy, and I think facial hair also confuses people. I will probably look like a teenager forever, which is both good and bad. It annoys me to be carded, but then it also annoys me not to be, because I feel like they're being irresponsible.

What has made me feel like an adult is probably living on my own, not in college, with my boyfriend. And then having a baby, which I did 10 months ago, pushed me further into adulthood, obviously! Though I seem to have gotten lucky because he is VERY well behaved for an infant.

Christine N.
03-12-2009, 04:56 PM
Funny, I don't FEEL old...

adarkfox
03-12-2009, 06:24 PM
Im achy and require oatmeal this morning... I feel old

JamieB
03-12-2009, 07:20 PM
So what exactly makes one a grown-up? Turning 18? rarely. Finishing college? Not for everybody. Having babies? That'll do it quick. What are some other, less obvious rites of passage that make us adults?

1) Making -- and KEEPING -- a dentist appointment.

2) Eating spinach on purpose. Because you like it.

3)???


How about taking Nexium like candy? Or, drinking a glass of wine on Friday night and it makes you so tired you fall asleep at 8:30? A big night out is getting a babysitter and going out to dinner and BORDERS with your husband.

Wow. I remember when my night didn't start until 11PM.

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 09:54 PM
A big night out is getting a babysitter and going out to dinner and BORDERS with your husband... Wow. I remember when my night didn't start until 11PM.

ha. No kids for me, but because 1) I started dating my now-husband seven years ago, when I was 18, and 2) from age 21-23 I worked in nightclubs and as a nightlife writer, by 25 I am prematurely old and jaded and boring. When I'm home, at least. I get my kicks backpacking in developing countries. Although I can't handle bugs in my bed (http://wanderlove.blogspot.com/2009/01/bugs-bugs-bugs.html) like I used to....

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 10:00 PM
Funny, I don't FEEL old...

When you're sixteen, adulthood seems impossibly distant. And then from the other end, you discover (surprise!) you're still the same person... But you'd never convince a teenager that. Though I guess that's our job by writing genuine YA characters.

kaitlin008
03-12-2009, 10:02 PM
I think I'm prematurely old too. But for no reason! After my freshman year of college, I was really over staying up late and all of that. Now, I can't handle staying up past 10, except on the rare occasion, and I get up early in the morning. I'm hoping I'll get a second wind when I'm a little older or something, because otherwise I might become boring!

And wow, wandergirl, backpacking in developing countries sounds extremely fun! I'd love to do that one day.

wandergirl
03-12-2009, 10:35 PM
And wow, wandergirl, backpacking in developing countries sounds extremely fun! I'd love to do that one day.

do it!!! It's so much easier than people think. I took my first extended trip when I was 20/21: six weeks in Central America with my then-boyfriend (now-husband, thankfully it lasted). Living out of a backpack, always on the go, meeting extraordinary people. It was the first of many trips, and honestly changed my life; it's what my first book is about, and eventually got me this job (http://gocentralamerica.about.com/).

ALSO: Plane tickets are super-cheap, especially to C.A. -- you can fly to Costa Rica or Panama from the US for $300 to $400, and once you're there (especially in Honduras, Nicaragua & Guatemala) you're barely spending anything... $5-$10 a night, $2-$3 for meals, etc. I am now focusing all my energy on my husband's company selling (big possibility) so we can break away and traverse the world.... :) We'll see.

kaitlin008
03-12-2009, 11:36 PM
That sounds awesome! I hope to do something cool vacation-wise when the baby gets a little older (or, ok, probably quite a bit older...) and I want to do something adventurous. My boyfriend & I both like camping, so I think we'd be bored if we went somewhere and just stayed in a hotel.

Christine N.
03-13-2009, 12:49 AM
When you're sixteen, adulthood seems impossibly distant. And then from the other end, you discover (surprise!) you're still the same person... But you'd never convince a teenager that. Though I guess that's our job by writing genuine YA characters.

Yeah, it's funny how that works. There are days I still feel sixteen.

(there are days I act sixteen - or even thirteen- too, but we won't talk about that.)

timewaster
03-13-2009, 01:23 AM
(there are days I act sixteen - or even thirteen- too, but we won't talk about that.)[/quote]

Yeah me too.Trust me, it's a seriously unattractive trait in a forty eight year old woman : (

Kathleen42
03-13-2009, 03:06 AM
(there are days I act sixteen - or even thirteen- too, but we won't talk about that.)

Yeah me too.Trust me, it's a seriously unattractive trait in a forty eight year old woman : ([/quote]

If it makes you feel any better, I'm thirty and sitting in a room filled with LotR and Doctor Who action figures... And there's a Mr. T bobble head staring at me as I type.

Christine N.
03-13-2009, 03:41 PM
My husband bought me a Nintendo DS for Christmas. I have Harry Potter video games. My mp3 player is pink.

Nope, not grown up here.

kaitlin008
03-13-2009, 04:46 PM
I love pink things! I have a pink Bible, even. And I have one of the Harry Potter video games for PS2. I have to get the simpler to control games because I am terrible at any of the ones that involve more than button mashing.

I can't wait till my son is old enough to get cool toys like matchbox cars and things. So I guess I'm maybe an eight year old at heart...

Kathleen42
03-13-2009, 04:51 PM
I love pink things! I have a pink Bible, even. And I have one of the Harry Potter video games for PS2. I have to get the simpler to control games because I am terrible at any of the ones that involve more than button mashing.

I can't wait till my son is old enough to get cool toys like matchbox cars and things. So I guess I'm maybe an eight year old at heart...

I see your Harry Potter games and I raise you three HP action figures (Ron, Harry, and Hermione) purchased to help cope with the end of the series.

Zipotes
03-13-2009, 04:58 PM
When you're sixteen, adulthood seems impossibly distant. And then from the other end, you discover (surprise!) you're still the same person... But you'd never convince a teenager that. Though I guess that's our job by writing genuine YA characters.


Well said, I feel the same. I'm 32 now and still feel 16.

Christine N.
03-13-2009, 10:18 PM
My laptop is pink.

I want a magic wand from Alivan's (http://www.alivans.com). So there.

And I'm coveting the new HP game, scheduled to come out in July. I want it on Wii. I have to replace my OOtP game for PS2 since it took a crap, and I want it for Wii too. :)

I also love Mario Kart. I'm SO not old.

Smish
03-13-2009, 10:43 PM
[quote=Christine N.;3386846]My laptop is pink.

I want a magic wand from Alivan's (http://www.alivans.com). So there.

quote]

Lol. I want a magic wand from Alivan's, too! Are you part of the monthly drawing for a free wand?

kaitlin008
03-13-2009, 11:29 PM
I also love Mario Kart. I'm SO not old.
Best game ever. Seriously. I actually bought an N64 off ebay a couple years ago because my sister wanted it (and the N64 Mario Kart) for Christmas.

Christine N.
03-14-2009, 04:13 AM
[quote=Christine N.;3386846]My laptop is pink.

I want a magic wand from Alivan's (http://www.alivans.com). So there.

quote]

Lol. I want a magic wand from Alivan's, too! Are you part of the monthly drawing for a free wand?

Of course!

And I have Mario Kart both for Wii AND DS. It IS the best game ever.

Enna
03-14-2009, 06:02 PM
Me too me too!

Just turned 29, writing YA.

Wii is awesome, and I LOVE Mario Kart.

But the best game ever? Super Monkey Ball (esp. the boxing and bowling) for GameCube. Seriously good adult entertainment. :D

Evaine
03-14-2009, 10:28 PM
I've got Sarah Jane Smith's sonic lipstick, from the Doctor Who spin off. I've always wanted to be Sarah Jane, ever since she stowed away in the Tardis in the early 70s.
(I've got a proper Tardis key, too - you never know when it might come in handy).

Christine N.
03-15-2009, 03:16 PM
I need to buy the HP games for my DS so I have them all. The first game only comes as regular PS or Nintendo Game Cube. My DS will play the GC cartridge.

wandergirl
03-15-2009, 11:14 PM
OMG BAD NEWS: http://jezebel.com/5170233/scientists-claim-that-old-age-begins-at-27

Christine N.
03-15-2009, 11:24 PM
No way! That's a lie!
I've been 'old' for ten years already?

Well, maybe my body has...

wandergirl
03-15-2009, 11:33 PM
You know, I was thinking about this, and how a woman's fertility starts to decline around 30.... maybe it's a physiological remnant of earlier centuries, in which 27-30 was a human's expected half-life, or even a little beyond.

Christine N.
03-16-2009, 05:58 PM
Heck, a few centuries ago, you were lucky if you made it to 40.

Red-Green
03-16-2009, 06:08 PM
What about those of us who were prematurely old as teenagers and who are now actually old, but writing about those prematurely old teenagers? (Hmmm...that would make for a long thread title, so I may just have to hang out here.)

Kathleen42
03-16-2009, 06:12 PM
I've got Sarah Jane Smith's sonic lipstick, from the Doctor Who spin off. I've always wanted to be Sarah Jane, ever since she stowed away in the Tardis in the early 70s.
(I've got a proper Tardis key, too - you never know when it might come in handy).

I always wanted to be Ace - but then I'm very much a child of the eighties.

eyeblink
03-16-2009, 11:06 PM
What about those of us who were prematurely old as teenagers and who are now actually old, but writing about those prematurely old teenagers? (Hmmm...that would make for a long thread title, so I may just have to hang out here.)

So I'm not alone then? :)

C.bronco
03-21-2009, 07:48 AM
When you're sixteen, adulthood seems impossibly distant. And then from the other end, you discover (surprise!) you're still the same person... But you'd never convince a teenager that. Though I guess that's our job by writing genuine YA characters.
It's funny how it works: spend youth wanting to be older and spend adulthood wanting to be younger.

Honestly, I don't want to be under 30 ever again. After 30, my confidence and sense of self finally evolved into something I could be happy with. Plus, I'm in better shape and more assertive.

On the other hand, I remember Everything, including being a kid and a teen. When I write YA, it is a reflection of my perspective from my ya age span, plus the bonus of insight afterwards.

Here's a caveat to teens: when people age, not everyone changes. Sometimes you just get more so of what you are. This can be good and bad in different circumstances.

JamieB
03-28-2009, 01:36 AM
Come on old folks like me - let's keep this thread alive!

adarkfox
03-28-2009, 07:44 AM
*infuses life into thread*
Random musing... being an "adult" makes me miss the routines and issues of teen life... writing YA is like my little vacation back into the "good old days".... mind you I wouldn't want to go BACK to those dreadful junior high/high school days but it sure is fun to take a visit and play awhile

JamieB
03-28-2009, 06:58 PM
I loved high school. I think I peeked in high school. It was better than college for me. The emotions are so raw then - new love and popularity concerns - everthing opposite of my adult life. Don't get me wrong, like C.bronco said, 30 was the turning point to finally feeling like I knew who I was and I have no desire to go back. But it's fun to visit with my characters. Although I love writing teenage boys for some reason, more so than girls. Is that odd?

Indus
03-28-2009, 10:40 PM
LOL this thread is awesome. I have a younger sister who's over a decade younger than me, so even though I'm 26 (about to be 27 in a few days) I feel sooo much older than her. BUT being able to be 'friends' with her as opposed to just siblings helps me stay in touch with the YA crowd. I like to write YA b/c I can put the character in similar situations, but I have the power over the delete button so it's more fun. hehe

wandergirl
03-28-2009, 11:28 PM
Why do the best ideas always strike when you're two seconds away from the best sleep ever...

I KNOW, RIGHT?!?!?

adktd2bks
04-01-2009, 12:39 AM
Although I love writing teenage boys for some reason, more so than girls. Is that odd?

That's me too! Whenever I think of a new story/plot it's always about a guy. I wonder if I'm trying to fulfill a lost dream?

RoseColoredSkies
04-01-2009, 01:00 AM
Speaking of writing about male protags. Both YA novels that I've got in the works, one of which I'm 1.5k in on have male protags. I am female.

What's interesting about the current WIP is not only are the main characters male, but they are ethnically different from myself. And I have to say its kind of fun to play in their world...lots of swearing!

Rebecca_Rogers
04-01-2009, 04:52 PM
I'm not old, but I'm not exactly a teenager. LOL (I'm only 23.) Does that count??

kaitlin008
04-01-2009, 05:10 PM
Yes, it counts! (I'm 23 as well). I think once you get to the point where you no longer have teen friends, you can't quite fit into the teen thread.

Kenny
04-01-2009, 05:10 PM
I'm not old, but I'm not exactly a teenager. LOL (I'm only 23.) Does that count??
I hope so, being only a handful of years older than you.

*Wonders where the life in this thread has gone.*

RoseColoredSkies
04-01-2009, 05:31 PM
Hmm...I still have friends who are teenagers...they're like 19. So does that count? I mean they may actually already be 20. That's what I get for being friends with people 2 years younger than me. Oh well...soon enough i'll be the youngster in school again.

Red.Ink.Rain
04-01-2009, 06:31 PM
I'm nineteen, and I'm starting to feel the weirdness of being between teen and adult. Why is it that when you're nineteen people in restaurants call you "ma'am" but you're still not trusted to drink a glass of wine with your mom on your birthday?

*rhetorical question* Lol.

kaitlin008
04-01-2009, 07:31 PM
I HATE being called ma'am. I used to work at a tourist spot in food service when I was in high school, and sometimes the customers would call me ma'am and I'd get so angry. As it is, I doubt I look my age, but was there a need to make me feel ancient when I was 17?

wandergirl
04-01-2009, 07:56 PM
*Wonders where the life in this thread has gone.*

we need to come up with some contentious topics.

RE: "Ma'am", I remember this time when I worked in a pet store at age 16, and this middle-aged woman came in, and for some reason I kept calling her "Miss". I knew it was awkward, but my mouth kept saying it. "Here's the fish food, Miss. What size are you looking for, Miss?" lol

Has that ever happened to you? (not necessarily calling someone Miss)

Kenny
04-01-2009, 11:05 PM
I used to talk to lots of random people so in the end I ended up calling them 'mate'. Expect for a few whom I knew their names and a few whom I called sir. But mate, or no name at all.

footloose
04-02-2009, 04:54 AM
Is there an explanation somewhere of the Twilight hook-up. Has there always been that connection on this site and I just never noticed? I feel like I stumbled into the Twilight Zone.

Red.Ink.Rain
04-02-2009, 06:09 AM
Lol, it's an April Fool's joke, footloose.

And look! Your name matches my avatar! :D

Claudia Gray
04-02-2009, 07:49 AM
My personal moment of "I'm not a kid anymore" came when the teenagers behind me were laughing and cutting up in a movie, and I turned around and asked them to be quiet -- and their eyes got really big, before they silently filed out of the theater. I felt old. But powerful! :D

eyeblink
04-02-2009, 11:02 AM
I've had a similar experience on this very site when people refer to films I remember being released as "oldies".

Also, having conversations *as equals* with people who are young enough to be my daughters or sons, who were born after I graduated from University (1987). Then again, I've always made a point of talking to children/teenagers in much the same ways as I'd talk to adults - with obvious restrictions in subjects and language when talking to younger children, of course.

Indus
04-02-2009, 11:21 AM
My personal moment of "I'm not a kid anymore" came when the teenagers behind me were laughing and cutting up in a movie, and I turned around and asked them to be quiet -- and their eyes got really big, before they silently filed out of the theater. I felt old. But powerful! :D


Ah, yes. I remember going to a concert and for the first time, all I could think was wow! This music is so loud. We're going to be deaf! Then some teenagers running around started a fight and made me spill my drink. I was so fed up I just wanted to go home lol. That's when I knew...

wandergirl
04-02-2009, 07:53 PM
GROWN-UPS VS TEENS, MY THEORY:

Nowadays,
1) we care more about other people's discomfort/what people think
2) we're more aware of our mortality

I think much of becoming an adult ties with these two.... paradigm shifts. We've lost all of our personal statuses as the ~*Invincible Center of the Universe*~.

For example, we'd never talk and joke super-loud in a theater, because we don't want to make other people uncomfortable; and besides, we want to watch the movie. (A third shift is our gradual awareness of the value of hard-earned money!)

Rebecca_Rogers
04-02-2009, 08:03 PM
I remember a time when I didn't care what people thought (still don't for the most part) but I care more now than I did back then. Youngsters looks up to once you're older and I think adults usually try to be the role model type: responsible, determined, independent... I also notice that I don't want to get out and run the roads/party/hang out as much as I used to.

Gahh I am getting old! :tongue

Red.Ink.Rain
04-02-2009, 09:32 PM
GROWN-UPS VS TEENS, MY THEORY:

Nowadays,
1) we care more about other people's discomfort/what people think
2) we're more aware of our mortality

(A third shift is our gradual awareness of the value of hard-earned money!)

Seconded.

Enna
04-03-2009, 04:35 PM
Thirded.

wandergirl, that was really well put. I was very self-absorbed as a teenager, I really started to realize that later in my twenties. And not to be dark, but I have been growing steadily more aware of my own mortality lately. Not fun...I'm not interested in reliving my teenage years, but it would be nice to grasp that kind of carefree feeling again.

I was so obnoxious in movie theaters back then. If I could reach back and slap myself through the time-space continuum, I'd so do it. (Any other How I Met Your Mother fans here? :))

Indus
04-03-2009, 04:44 PM
Thirded.

wandergirl, that was really well put. I was very self-absorbed as a teenager, I really started to realize that later in my twenties. And not to be dark, but I have been growing steadily more aware of my own mortality lately. Not fun...I'm not interested in reliving my teenage years, but it would be nice to grasp that kind of carefree feeling again.

I was so obnoxious in movie theaters back then. If I could reach back and slap myself through the time-space continuum, I'd so do it. (Any other How I Met Your Mother fans here? :))


Woo! How I Met Your Mother!! lol. Yes, I agree. I woulda wanted to slap myself as well, which kinda made me laugh.
As a teen, I wouldn't be caught dead reading YA novels (granted I don't think the ones that were around when I was 14 or 15 are as...hmm what's the right word here?) That being said, with some exceptions, I prefer them to regular novels now lol. Maybe that's how I keep in touch with the carefree feelings of my youth.

Enna
04-03-2009, 04:51 PM
Yeah, YA books were a lot different when I was a tween/teen. Sweet Valley High, Babysitters Club...Nancy Drew, was that YA? Anyway, that was what I read up until I was 13. Then I read Dolores Claiborne by Stephen King, and it was over. The next "YA" book I read was Harry Potter, 12 years later. :)

JamieB
04-03-2009, 08:02 PM
I really don't remember reading outside of school assigned books until high school and then it was adult books. Of course, I'm not sure there was a YA category in my pre-teen to early teen years.

Indus
04-03-2009, 10:10 PM
I don't really remember there being a distinctive YA genre either. I wonder how long ago YA was actually established as a genre...

**wanders off to Google pointless things to avoid the much dreading editing process**

<---------

wandergirl
04-03-2009, 10:35 PM
Do you guys know about Fine Lines (http://jezebel.com/tag/fine-lines/)? It's a section of Jezebel where a writer (I believe she's in her early 30s) reread and reviewed all the YA that affected her as a teen. Now defunct, because she's working on turning it into a book. There's definitely been a YA genre for a couple decades now -- think Christopher Pike, Lois Duncan, Robert Cormier and of course, some Judy Blume -- but this clear-cut YA renaissance is recent. I actually blogged about it a few months back (http://wanderlove.blogspot.com/2008/12/ode-to-yas-coming-of-age.html). It's an exciting time to be coming into the genre as writers, but I can't help wishing I had such great age-specific books when I was a teen.

Claudia Gray
04-03-2009, 10:47 PM
I was a huge reader of "Sweet Dreams," the G-rated romance novels line in the 1980s. I had dozens; I wish I still had them today!

JamieB
04-04-2009, 08:14 AM
I do remember the choose your own adventure type romance books. You either go with Kyle to Paris or go with Roger to Rome. I loved those - there were no bad choices and the next time through if you went with Kyle the first time, you get to go with Roger.

It may have been rose colored glasses in book form for impressionable young women formulating ideas about romantic relationships. (Seriously, whose boyfriend wisks them off to Paris?) BUT, a great read when you're 13.

Indus
04-04-2009, 08:21 AM
There's definitely been a YA genre for a couple decades now -- think Christopher Pike, Lois Duncan, Robert Cormier and of course, some Judy Blume --
Completely forgot about the Christopher Pike, R L Stine, all those type of books I read. See...the old age is getting to me lol

kikilynn
04-04-2009, 08:44 AM
I was big into the boxcar children, and the choose your own adventure books. I still read YA novels now, sadly, I even watch SVH on abc family. It's the tween inside me, she needs to get out once in awhile.

Indus
04-04-2009, 10:32 AM
I was big into the boxcar children, and the choose your own adventure books. I still read YA novels now, sadly, I even watch SVH on abc family. It's the tween inside me, she needs to get out once in awhile.

**Sometimes I find myself 'accidentally' watching Wizards of Waverly Place, That's So Raven, or Saved by the Bell (and by accidentally, I mean when my husband walks in the living room, I insist I had been watching something educational, but our son had changed the channel). Ahhh, guilty pleasures ....I won't tell if you won't lol

Enna
04-04-2009, 11:11 AM
The Boxcar Children!!! How did I forget them?

Choose Your Own Adventure was great too, obviously. And the Goosebumps series, of course!

I liked books with young protagonists, but that doesn't mean they were YA necessarily. I loved The Secret Garden, and Narnia.

Indus
04-04-2009, 11:44 AM
LOL I was terrible at Choose Your Own Adventures. I always checked the first paragraph of all the possible scenarios before making a 'choice'. Even at nine or ten I was a rebel :)

Rosebutterfly
04-04-2009, 01:39 PM
Can I join in? I am a granma and write for teens. I love How I met Your Mother.
I can't remember reading YA books in my teens, but I was something of a geek and was reading LOTR at 8.

Enna
04-05-2009, 06:34 PM
Yay, another HIMYM fan!! Hi Rosebutterfly!

The thing I remember reading most at 8 was Nancy Drew...the old, original ones. My school library had all of them, and I read every single one. When I found the new "modern" ones, it was like winning the lottery....

Bess ticked me off. I hated that they kept talking about how chunky she was, and how shallow she came off when she complained about it.

kikilynn
04-05-2009, 08:39 PM
**Sometimes I find myself 'accidentally' watching Wizards of Waverly Place, That's So Raven, or Saved by the Bell (and by accidentally, I mean when my husband walks in the living room, I insist I had been watching something educational, but our son had changed the channel). Ahhh, guilty pleasures ....I won't tell if you won't lol

I know what you mean. I've gone up to my daughters room, to tell her goodnight. I won't leave until her show is over. I remember watching Raven on the Cosby show when I was a kid.

Indus
04-05-2009, 11:01 PM
Oh, I hate that. I find myself saying more and more, "Hey! Look it's those twins from Full House and now they're all grown up...crap, I'm old lol."

BTW: Tomorrow is my b-day, putting me even one year further away from my favorite genre!! Woohoo!!!! :D

kikilynn
04-05-2009, 11:04 PM
I think of it this way, were all teenage girls (or boys) trapped in an adult body. It doesnt matter how old you are in years. Were all children at heart.

Indus
04-05-2009, 11:12 PM
I completely agree! lol...especially now that this year might be the year we forgo candles on the cake as a safety precaution. But woohoo for red velvet with cream cheese frosting mmmm...

Red.Ink.Rain
04-06-2009, 04:32 AM
Haha, wow, does remembering Full House and Family Matters make you old? In that case, I'm ancient at nineteen...because I STILL love those shows. Nick at Nite, baby.

Phantom
04-06-2009, 04:39 AM
Wait... Uh... so I'm I old? I'm only thirteen and I LOVE Full House, Nancy Drew (book and TV), Hardy Boys (book and TV), Get Smart, and The Rockford Files...

Indus
04-06-2009, 09:15 AM
No lol. I just remember when shows like Full House aired originally (TGIF on Friday nights) and those two little boys who play Nikki and Alex are all grown up now. They have their own show on Disney and I feel old when I see that they're like 12 or 13 now.

Red.Ink.Rain
04-06-2009, 09:22 AM
I remember that too...

Wait, who are the boys who played Nikki and Alex?

Indus
04-06-2009, 11:21 AM
I don't know their names, but they're the kids on "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody" now.

Enna
04-06-2009, 03:23 PM
Next thing you know they'll make a record and top Billboard. Isn't that how it goes...Disney Channel, then pop star? Or is it pop star then Disney Channel? Or does it just overlap now?

kikilynn
04-06-2009, 08:48 PM
OMG That's them on suite life? Wow...I had NO idea.

Red.Ink.Rain
04-06-2009, 09:06 PM
i had no idea either! Are you sure?

Indus
04-06-2009, 09:08 PM
I think the pattern is: disney tv sitcom, disney made for tv movie (usually just a two hour special of said sitcom), c.d. release, millions of dollars at 15, and finally rehab....lol I kid, I kid

wandergirl
04-06-2009, 09:56 PM
Actually... The Suite Life of Zack & Cody (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0426371/)* stars the twins who played Ross's son in Friends, and the kid in that Adam Sandler movie Big Daddy... Looks like the Full House twins ( twin A (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0876770/)& B (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0876771/)) haven't done much of anything.

*I can't believe I know this

Indus
04-06-2009, 11:21 PM
My bad lol. I stand corrected :)

JamieB
04-07-2009, 01:49 AM
Oh, I hate that. I find myself saying more and more, "Hey! Look it's those twins from Full House and now they're all grown up...crap, I'm old lol."

BTW: Tomorrow is my b-day, putting me even one year further away from my favorite genre!! Woohoo!!!! :D

Happy Birthday Indus!

wandergirl
04-07-2009, 01:59 AM
Happy Birthday Indus!

Seconded!

kikilynn
04-07-2009, 02:02 AM
Happy Happy Birthday! :p

Indus
04-07-2009, 10:53 AM
Aw thanks guys!

SuperSpy
04-07-2009, 11:36 AM
Hahahaha, this thread is cool, although...I've only just left my teen years since I'm twenty. But people always think I'm older than I am...so...do I count?

If it helps, I'm a serious HIMYM addict. I'm even going laser tagging tomorrow. :)

Indus
04-07-2009, 02:16 PM
Laser-tagging you say?! well that's just legen...


Dary!
Sorry. Couldn't resist lol

Indus
04-08-2009, 08:41 PM
Knock knock....?

SarahMacManus
04-08-2009, 10:31 PM
I was big into the boxcar children, and the choose your own adventure books. I still read YA novels now, sadly, I even watch SVH on abc family. It's the tween inside me, she needs to get out once in awhile.

OOOOH! I LOVED Boxcar Children! In fact I loved any YA books that featured teens that were orphaned/independent survivors: Julie of the Wolves, Island of the Blue Dolphins. Where the Lilies Bloom was one of my particular favorites.

SuperSpy
04-08-2009, 10:39 PM
Knock knock....?

who's there?

Indus
04-09-2009, 02:40 PM
who's there?


Madam

Indus
04-09-2009, 07:36 PM
Do you guys ever just get stuck? I know what scene I'm moving to and am happy with the one I just finished. It's that little bridge in between that has left me stagnant for the past three days. Each scene needs to be moving somewhere, accomplishing something is what I keep reading, but I'm having trouble finding a way to blend into that grrr frustrating.

wandergirl
04-09-2009, 08:01 PM
Do you guys ever just get stuck? I know what scene I'm moving to and am happy with the one I just finished. It's that little bridge in between that has left me stagnant for the past three days. Each scene needs to be moving somewhere, accomplishing something is what I keep reading, but I'm having trouble finding a way to blend into that grrr frustrating.

It's always those parts that give me trouble. If I'm totally stuck, I allow myself to move on, and plow through it another day when I'm new & refreshed. In my WIP I'm revising, the part that's giving me the biggest grief is a major bridge like that, sort of a passage of time chapter. I'm experimenting with cutting it altogether, and alluding to the events of the time passage in the next scene.

JamieB
04-09-2009, 08:17 PM
I get stuck a lot and can't bring myself to outline, which would probably help. I tried outlining once and didn't follow it, so it was useless. Guess I'm just not very structured that way.

I'd rather be stuck with all kinds of options available to me when I'm first creating it than revise the first draft. That's where I am now...ugh...now if I don't like it have have to go back and rewrite the whole darn thing. Fortunately I still think the plot works, so it's just revisions on some things.

But yeah, I'm always stuck on something.

wandergirl
04-09-2009, 08:49 PM
Rught now, I'm stuck on editing these college essays for the class I TA. Plus I have a massive magazine feature due. Somebody, say something to make my brain stop swimming. All I want to do is write for myself.

Indus
04-09-2009, 09:16 PM
Aw. :( I'm sorry. I wish I knew what to say to help. If it makes you feel any better, I only get to write when my son's napping or spongebob squarepants is on. And lemme tell ya...If I find myself typing out 'Who lives in a pineapple under the sea' in the middle of a big dialogue section one more time....

YAwriter72
04-09-2009, 09:18 PM
Aw. :( I'm sorry. I wish I knew what to say to help. If it makes you feel any better, I only get to write when my son's napping or spongebob squarepants is on. And lemme tell ya...If I find myself typing out 'Who lives in a pineapple under the sea' in the middle of a big dialogue section one more time....


ROFL! I type amidst Wordgirl and Ruff Ruffman!

wandergirl
04-09-2009, 09:36 PM
hahaha. I've done that with song lyrics. So I'm listening to Sigur Ros, where the only lyrics are incomprehensible Icelandic murmurings.

Indus
04-09-2009, 10:20 PM
That sounds relaxing. Is it helping with the essays and magazine feature?
LOL I can't lie. That sounds way more exciting than an average day here :) But I did back into the gate in our driveway today...all the German folk turned and laughed at the silly American.

wandergirl
04-10-2009, 01:20 AM
it sounds exciting, but in the end it's all just words swimming on my computer screen...
where are you in Germany? why are you in Germany? That's so awesome! I have such itchy feet right now (see my screenname) .... need... to... travel...

Indus
04-10-2009, 01:53 AM
We live near Kaiserslautern, about an hour from Frankfurt. My husband is military and we got sent out here back in January. I was so excited about it since I'd never moved further than thirty minutes away from where I grew up. It's definitely been an experience so far lol. But the sightseeing has been amazing. The driving...a bit scary. Where are you wanting to travel to?

Leila
04-10-2009, 01:02 PM
I write at work while I'm on my breaks. I get interrupted endlessly by people wanting to bitch with me about something, wanting to know where on earth I put the new Thomas the Tank Engine posters, or needing me to come rescue them when the computer is being confusing. Gah!

I get stuck reasonably often and I am allergic to outlines. Outlines make me want to kill things. Often my solution is either to get myself to the end of the scene as quickly as possible and go on to something more interesting, or to just let something random happen. I usually have a good idea of where things are going, but I let my characters get there however they like. And they often surprise me. And if all else fails, I swear by Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott.


I'm listening to Sigur Ros, where the only lyrics are incomprehensible Icelandic murmurings.

LOVE Sigur Ros. I have absolutely no idea what any of their songs are about, but they're utterly beautiful.

wandergirl
04-11-2009, 04:03 AM
LOVE Sigur Ros. I have absolutely no idea what any of their songs are about, but they're utterly beautiful.

OMG so I just googled "Sigur Ros translations" and learned a lot of their songs are in a made-up language called Hopelandic.

Could that BE any more AWESOME???

ETA: "All of the lyrics on ( ) are sung in Vonlenska, also known as Hopelandic, a constructed language of nonsense syllables which resembles the phonology of the Icelandic language. It has also been said that the listener is supposed to interpret their own meanings of the lyrics which can then be written in the blank pages in the album booklet." (from wikipedia)

Leila
04-11-2009, 10:42 AM
OMG so I just googled "Sigur Ros translations" and learned a lot of their songs are in a made-up language called Hopelandic.

Could that BE any more AWESOME???

ETA: "All of the lyrics on ( ) are sung in Vonlenska, also known as Hopelandic, a constructed language of nonsense syllables which resembles the phonology of the Icelandic language. It has also been said that the listener is supposed to interpret their own meanings of the lyrics which can then be written in the blank pages in the album booklet." (from wikipedia)

That is beyond awesome. In fact, I can't really find words for just how awesome that is. Their music is even more beautiful to me now, knowing that.

Indus
04-11-2009, 03:51 PM
So just have to say, I had no clue who Sigur Ros was until you guys started talking about them....and well darn it I kinda LOVE them. You guys have some pretty cool taste :) Thanks for helping me add to my music library.

wandergirl
04-11-2009, 10:42 PM
So just have to say, I had no clue who Sigur Ros was until you guys started talking about them....and well darn it I kinda LOVE them. You guys have some pretty cool taste :) Thanks for helping me add to my music library.

It's the best writing music because it's so raw and emotional, but there are no (English) lyrics... in particular, check out "Seaglopur" from takka... Staralfur from Hvarf - Heim, and "(vaka)" from ().

(It looks like I'm talkin' nonsense, but takka..., Hvarf - Heim and () are the album names... weird huh)

Indus
04-15-2009, 08:59 PM
Guys, these young people in the 'Teens writing for teens' thread are seriously kicking our butts! Our thread is almost off the first page and that's just unacceptable! :)

wandergirl
04-15-2009, 10:36 PM
seriously. Like I said, we need a contentious topic (like "homo-erotic overtones", lol) to get this thing going.

This isn't exactly contentious, but have you or anyone else had their wisdom teeth removed? Because I'm getting them yanked on Friday and I'm ascared. Especially after I saw this video on Jezebel: http://jezebel.com/5211731/woman-says-funny-things-on-pain-meds-loving-family-shares-video

Indus
04-15-2009, 11:40 PM
I wasn't brave enough to watch that lol, but I've had mine pulled. They had to give me laughing gas just to get my pulse low enough for them to put me to sleep lol. I was terrified. I can't lie, a couple hours after it'll feel like you got smacked up a bit. But as long as you take your pain pills and DO NOT drink out of straws for a week or so lol it'll be over before you know it. You'll do fine :)