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View Full Version : DRUGS!!! :P



Red.Ink.Rain
03-03-2009, 08:48 AM
I have a quick CSI-esque question. If you mix a powdered or liquid form of a hallucinogenic drug with paint, paint a long stretch of wall, and place someone in that room - would the drug affect them? Or would you have to heat that paint in order to vaporize the drug and someone would have to inhale it?

Horseshoes
03-03-2009, 10:46 AM
yanno, I cannot imagine phencyclidine or lysergic acid working too well in such an application...but then my studies on those didn't include the old paint it on the walls scenario. Still, if you want to be true, choose your drug and go after the question more specifically...when you name it and contact some noted researcher of its effects, note also the size of the room, the size of the person, the heating/AC system in the room, whether there are plants, aquariums, other factors affecting the room air.

And depending on your story's readers, publisher, you can always make it up. Make up an analog of LSD or some such. Just painting a room can intoxicate some people...presumably you want to induce loopier behavior than a garden variety drunk though.

What is it you want to happen for your story's purpose?

Red.Ink.Rain
03-03-2009, 11:25 AM
You know, I think I figured out a way around it. Thank you, though.

Fingers
03-04-2009, 09:06 AM
I dont know about painting it on walls, but you could mix the lsd with some DMSO (di methyl sulfoxide) (sp) and put it on something like a vase or drinking glass or some object the person is likely to handle. DMSO is quite readily absorbed through the skin and anything on the skin or the object handled will be absorbed by the person.


yer pal Brian

GeorgeK
03-04-2009, 09:01 PM
some DMSO

True, but it also has a very intense garlic smell. We used to use DMSO in urinary bladder irrigations for interstitial cystitis patients and always had to warn them ahead of time. Some women said that their husbands wouldn't sleep with them for 3-5 days after a bladder wash. That wasn't always a bad thing.

Fingers
03-07-2009, 10:14 PM
Interesting. My father used it on his shoulder for his bursitis. His DMSO was virtually odorless to me but it left a taste of almonds in your mouth after using. Sorry for off topic.


yer pal Brian

waylander
03-07-2009, 11:54 PM
True, but it also has a very intense garlic smell. We used to use DMSO in urinary bladder irrigations for interstitial cystitis patients and always had to warn them ahead of time. Some women said that their husbands wouldn't sleep with them for 3-5 days after a bladder wash. That wasn't always a bad thing.

Rather depends on how much residual dimethyl sulfide there is in your DMSO, as that is the smelly stuff. Really clean DMSO doesn't smell.
Possibly there is some reductive process going on in your patients taking the DMSO down to DMS

GeorgeK
03-08-2009, 05:17 AM
Rather depends on how much residual dimethyl sulfide there is in your DMSO, as that is the smelly stuff. Really clean DMSO doesn't smell.
Possibly there is some reductive process going on in your patients taking the DMSO down to DMS

Maybe it's the manufacturer or something to do with human applications vs laboratory, or the concentration? That's the only time we used DMSO. I never actually questioned the why. I always assumed it was the DMSO itself. You could smell it when the nurse was mixing it, before instillation. The protocol for bladder irrigation had the paient urinate first, then it was instilled through a sterile catheter. It came in a sealed vial. Most of the IC patients have effectively small capacity bladders and they tend to be rather dehydrated, so It shouldn't be a urine interaction. If it helps, they almost all had rather acidic urine, typically 5-5.5 pH and often they couldn't hold it for very long.

waylander
03-08-2009, 01:12 PM
Maybe it's the manufacturer or something to do with human applications vs laboratory, or the concentration? That's the only time we used DMSO. I never actually questioned the why. I always assumed it was the DMSO itself. You could smell it when the nurse was mixing it, before instillation. The protocol for bladder irrigation had the paient urinate first, then it was instilled through a sterile catheter. It came in a sealed vial. Most of the IC patients have effectively small capacity bladders and they tend to be rather dehydrated, so It shouldn't be a urine interaction. If it helps, they almost all had rather acidic urine, typically 5-5.5 pH and often they couldn't hold it for very long.

This suggests that it is present in the material you receive from the manufacturer. Possibly there is some disproportionation of the DMSO to DMS and dimethyl sulfone