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View Full Version : How long before you can hate your job?



Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:25 AM
I just started a new job this past week and I hate it already. I mean really hate it. Is it normal to hate a job that soon?

Fractured_Chaos
05-30-2005, 04:27 AM
Depends on the job. I tried outbound telemarketing, and discovered within the first hour that I hated it.

Other jobs I've had, I didn't hate, but the work was the same damn thing every single day, that I burned out.

Then I've had jobs that I loved, but hated the people I worked with.

Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:30 AM
So, what do you do with a job you hate within a week? Actually, I hated it within a few hours but I stuck it out to see if my feelings would change. They didn't.

Renee
05-30-2005, 04:30 AM
Is it normal to hate a job that soon?

Yeah, it's normal to me..it's never too soon..:ROFL:
Hope ya find some things you like about it though - it sure makes a job easier!

Gehanna
05-30-2005, 04:31 AM
Do you hate it in general or just certain aspects of it?

Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:33 AM
Do you hate it in general or just certain aspects of it?

Ahhhh, pretty much all of it. What very little satisfaction I get out of it doesn't make up for what I hate about it.

Gehanna
05-30-2005, 04:52 AM
Sorry to hear that Azura Skye.

Fractured_Chaos
05-30-2005, 05:05 AM
So, what do you do with a job you hate within a week? Actually, I hated it within a few hours but I stuck it out to see if my feelings would change. They didn't.

Start hunting for another one ASAP (if you can't afford to just quit, that is). The sooner you're gone, the better, because if you hate it that much, you're just going to be miserable, and being miserable sucks out vital, life-giving, and creative energy.

If you can afford to quit, do so.

btw...there's no shame in leaving a job you hate, for a job you like better.

aboyd
05-30-2005, 06:39 AM
I had a job at an Internet startup back during the dot-com boom. I was already feeling uncomfortable before I even accepted the job offer, and they threw money at me, and I took it against my best judgment. The first day was sheer hell. They did not mention this until after they hired me, but apparently someone on my team had pissed off the CEO. No one had the nerve to fire him. So they wanted ME to do it. This was never communicated, but on my first day, it was on my list of tasks to do.

I simply refused. This person was going to do a poor job for me, or somehow make himself a liability, before I would terminate his employment. This in turn infuriated the CEO, who worked with other employees to turn me into a walking ulcer over the next few months.

The point is that I knew I had stepped into a big flaming pile of poo. But I stuck with it for 6 months, fighting to turn things around. Something quite satisfying happened in the end, but I would trade it in a second to get that 6 months of my life back. Don't wait. Your gut is a big hint about the state of things. If you hate the job, get out while the getting is good.

-Tony

Chacounne
05-30-2005, 09:42 AM
I was a full-time live out nanny for twelve years, mostly with under three year olds, and I had uniformly wonderful kids and parents to work with... until the last one.

The last family had three children:
a thirteen month old little girl, who was too young to be problem;
a two and half year old little boy, who had never been told no and was as
strong as an ox, so when I picked him up and took him to his room to
give him a time out he dug his finger nails into the back of my hands,
leaving permanent scars (oh did I mention that he mainlined chocolate
milk because his parents never gave him a bottle without chocolate in
it?) ;
and their 8 year old brother who turned 9 while I was there, who
was, and I use this term advisedly, a budding sociopath. I say
sociopath because he demonstrated to me repeatedly that he had no
compassion or empathy for anyone else in the world, even those in his
family. During the time that I was there he threw a shampoo bottle at his
sister, who had just learned how to walk, because he was trying to get
back at me for trying to put him in his room after he flipped me the bird in
front of his mother. His mother did nothing to help me, instead letting him
out of his room 5 minutes after he was there and not even demanding
that he apologize! His mother also said nothing when the following
situation occurred: he asked her if he could do something and she said
she needed to think about it; he looked at me, smiled a huge beatific
smile, and said:"Oh good, I get to do it. I get to dao anything it want."
His parents also did nothing when he destroyed a pair of shoes of mine by
putting shampoo in them.
In short, the family was out of control and mightmare to work for. Every
day of the three months I worked there my mother, my father and my
husband urged me to quit, reminding me that my mental health was more
important than any paycheque. What is striking to me in retrospect is
that none of them had ever quit a job in their lives, and they were all in
agreement. However, I was stubborn, so I stuck it out until they decided
they couldn't afford me and let me go on my answering machine over a
weekend while I was in Seattle.

What did I lean from this mess? To quote my father, "Life is too short."
Never sacrifice your integrity or your mental health for paycheque; it's
just not worth it. I know it may seem overwhelming right now, but
please think about what is really in your best interests. Everyone's
situation is different, so YMMV, but I hope it's something you will think
about.

Take good care,
Chacounne

Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:02 PM
Thanks for the replies. I called in this morning and told them I wasn't coming back. The training period for this job is long and intensive so I thought I should do it early instead of waiting before they let me work on my own. I apologized profusely because I really do feel badly for doing this; however, I feel good with the decision. I don't like being unemployed yet again but the sense of peace I have is worth it.

This is only the third time I've done this in my life. Somehow you just know, at least I do. If it sucks early on it's safe to say it probably won't get better.

MacAllister
05-30-2005, 04:42 PM
And better to nip it in the bud, so you don't have to put it on your resume and try to explain it, in your interviews at other places. :)

Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:53 PM
And better to nip it in the bud, so you don't have to put it on your resume and try to explain it, in your interviews at other places. :)

Exactly! That's another reason I wanted to get out so quickly.

allion
05-30-2005, 08:33 PM
Azura, you did the right thing. Your mental health is not worth the aggravation and strain, even though it may mean you're without a paycheque right now.

I've done this twice before. First time, I had a job for about 6 weeks. It was reception work, dull, but it paid ok. On a Friday afternoon, they tried to tell me I would be working an extra half-hour and not be paid for it (!). As well, I would have to go out on the shop floor (without safety shoes or a hard hat or ear protection) to get paperwork from the other office at the end of the floor. This place made auto parts. And the kicker - they brought in another woman to do the job I was hired to do without telling me. I faxed them my resignation on Monday morning and ducked the phone call from my idiot boss.

Second time, I had a job at Wal-Mart. I lasted 2 months to the day, and I knew going in that it was a stop-gap job to begin with. From the first day I was there, I knew I had made a huge mistake. Do not misunderstand me - retail is one of the most difficult jobs to do, and it doesn't pay enough for the constant stress. Add in a manager who could not communicate at all, and I was cranky. I luckily found the job where I am now, and I've survived for about a year here.

It's still a struggle - I'm a contract person, so I'm still looking for a real permanent job. I remain hopeful every day that this may be the day I find the job I want.

Best to you,

Karen

brokenfingers
05-30-2005, 08:41 PM
I just started a new job this past week and I hate it already. I mean really hate it. Is it normal to hate a job that soon?

Hello Azura Skye,

I can relate to what you're saying. I've hated just about every job I've ever had and quit all of them. There's always somebody trying to tell you what to do or correcting you or keeping track if you show up etc.

I thought I'd finally found my destiny when I decided to try my hand at writing but now I'm thinking I may have to quit that one too because I find myself constantly struggling with my internal editor.


...sigh....

MacAllister
05-30-2005, 08:46 PM
now I'm thinking I may have to quit that one too because I find myself constantly struggling with my internal editor.
That's a constant state of being, for a writer, BF. It's always a struggle to keep it in balance.

Hang in there.

brokenfingers
05-30-2005, 08:50 PM
I just hate being told what to do. It's a failing of mine.

And he's so adamant and demanding sometimes. Really he's just insufferable. Typical assh*le boss.

If he gets on my back one more time for not showing up to write when I'm supposed to....

MacAllister
05-30-2005, 08:56 PM
If he gets on my back one more time for not showing up to write when I'm supposed to.... That's the only thing he IS allowed to get on your back for.

Otherwise, just choke him into submission...

BlueTexas
05-30-2005, 11:47 PM
Start hunting for another one ASAP (if you can't afford to just quit, that is). The sooner you're gone, the better, because if you hate it that much, you're just going to be miserable, and being miserable sucks out vital, life-giving, and creative energy.

If you can afford to quit, do so.

btw...there's no shame in leaving a job you hate, for a job you like better.

I second this advice. I just quit a job that I've hated for two years. It took me a week to feel like myself again, rather than the rotten b*tch I'd become. I was working six days a week, stressed out all the time and my creativity was mostly something I could see but not reach.

My husband, after freaking out about the lost income, thanked me for quitting cause he got his nice old wife back. Staying at that job could have led down a bad road.

I've since taken back the job I had before. It pays less, the hours aren't as good, but it's a known good, and being happy is worth more than money.

Find a new job. Life's too short to be miserable and make your loved ones miserable, too.

jackie106
05-31-2005, 12:15 AM
Thanks for the replies. I called in this morning and told them I wasn't coming back. The training period for this job is long and intensive so I thought I should do it early instead of waiting before they let me work on my own. I apologized profusely because I really do feel badly for doing this; however, I feel good with the decision. I don't like being unemployed yet again but the sense of peace I have is worth it.

This is only the third time I've done this in my life. Somehow you just know, at least I do. If it sucks early on it's safe to say it probably won't get better.

It sounds like you made the right decision.

Best of luck in finding new employment!

Jackie

Azure Skye
05-31-2005, 01:21 AM
Get this...one of the supervisors called back later in the day and asked me to come back but in a different position. I'm entertaining the idea as I really do need a job.

BradyH1861
05-31-2005, 01:51 AM
I lasted two hours as a waiter when I was in high school.

Brady H.