PDA

View Full Version : Gardeners of AW, unite



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fenika
02-22-2009, 08:23 PM
A few searches failed to turn up a good gardening forum, particularly an indoor gardening one (suggestions welcome), but I was curious what everyone here was planning for this summer. Or, for those of you under the equator, what do you have growing?

I just bought a T5 light and placed my avocado under it. The poor thing was not doing well with limited window light but is perking up nicely.

My mom also put her thyme beast under the light, and we have some Basil sproutlings that we just put under the light today. I can't wait to walk across the room from the kitchen to get fresh basil for cooking :D

For the summer I'm thinking banana sweet peppers for the outdoor garden, but I'm not sure I'll still be in the area. Oh, and the indoor light needs some chives under it soon.

What's everyone else got?

shakeysix
02-22-2009, 08:37 PM
i am here in my overalls and gloves, trowel in hand. on tuesday i am buying a house, my first in ten years. the yard is huge and blank! there is not even a tree. i am going to go slow because i could cobb things up if i don't think it out. this spring i am putting in fruit trees--apricot, peach, cherry. and a vegetable garden--some cosmos, zinnias and snaps of course, and a porch full of geraniums, maybe window boxes. eventually i want roses and a patio and maybe a bog garden---s6

Fenika
02-22-2009, 08:41 PM
Oh, that sounds lovely, Shakey. Get pictures- before, in process, and after :)

And you say bog garden, but what about a nice pond for the birds and other wildlife? I love a good little pond garden. Actually, what is a bog garden exactly?

Mr Flibble
02-22-2009, 08:45 PM
Sadly I only have a small garden at the moment.

Double sadly the new puppy ate it last year :( Who knew dogs liked eating strawberry plants?

But my roses ( dog can't eat them lol) are looking good so far. I like to plant things and let it all go a bit wild, so I've got climbing roses mixed with honeysuckle, honeysuckle working it's way through the mock orange and Californian lilac, Love in the Mist seeding itself everywhere, including the gaps in the patio etc. Scented plants are my particular weakness :D

Soccer Mom
02-22-2009, 08:47 PM
Oh, I love me some gardening. Right now I'm growing carrots and radishes for my pets. The blackberry vines are sprouting now. My Rosemary is looking lovely because its been a mild winter.

NeuroFizz
02-22-2009, 08:48 PM
Just yesterday I planted two bareroot trees--an apple (variety - cinnamon spice) and an apricot. I also put in another grape vine (concord seedless).

Fenika
02-22-2009, 08:49 PM
The puppy ate the strawberries? To the pound with that one ;)

I've been wondering if I can get a row of strawberries under the light. We don't have enough room outside for them (the lot is mostly wooded) and by summer most the other plants will be outside...

And that's another set up I want pics of IRU :)

Fenika
02-22-2009, 08:50 PM
Oh, I love me some gardening. Right now I'm growing carrots and radishes for my pets. The blackberry vines are sprouting now. My Rosemary is looking lovely because its been a mild winter.


Just yesterday I planted two bareroot trees--an apple (variety - cinnamon spice) and an apricot. I also put in another grape vine (concord seedless).

*drools*

nevada
02-22-2009, 08:51 PM
hmmm sadly i live in a climate where we can't even think about planting till the may long weekend. right now there is snow and the ground is still frozen. in the last house we did have a great garden. lots of flowers, picked willy nilly simply because they were pretty. first year the rabbits ate the carnations so we never had a bloom. but they bushed out nicely (the carnations not the rabbits) and the second year we had a huge clump of carnations. gardening is fast in calgary. plant in may, enjoy in july, by september you're covering the tomatoes because sometimes we get killer frost already. by october everything is gone and you're waiting till may again. this year i'll be back in an apartment by may (hopefully) so no gardening for me. I do miss it.

Mr Flibble
02-22-2009, 08:56 PM
And that's another set up I want pics of IRU :)

As soon as stuff starts flowering ( dog ate the bloody snowdrops and daffs too!)

Sophia
02-22-2009, 08:57 PM
Gardening! :) The garlic shoots are about three inches high now, and will be ready to harvest in June. We planted shallots last week, both in the ground and in large pots, which should be also be ready in June.

The bluebells, tulips, gladioli and daffodils are growing and should flower in the next month or so. There are buds on the willow tree and cherry, and one on the new apple tree. That one's a bit of a worry - we're wondering whether to nip it off as the apple is supposed to bud in several places, not just at the top.

The herb bed is full of established perennials. We're growing coriander, sweet pea and chilean glory flower in nursery pots at the moment. They get put outside during the day to toughen up and brought inside at night. Once the weather is warmer, we'll grow annual herbs in pots on little racks on the side of the house.

The main project this year is sorting out a sloping bed at the rear of the garden, which we want to create a Japanese rock garden feel on. We need to work out what slate, rocks and plants we'll need, and see how much we can afford to spend each week on it.

My dream is to replace the grass on the lawn with moss, which I love, but I'm content to leave it as a dream. :)

Sophia
02-22-2009, 08:58 PM
Has anyone tried growing strawberries in hanging baskets? It's something I'm going to try this year.

Ken
02-22-2009, 08:59 PM
...do artificial ones count? I have two plastic pine branches with metal stems that I once removed from a thrown out Christmas tree. Stood upright they look like little trees. Been waitin' for birds to nest in 'em these last few years, but so far no takers.

shakeysix
02-22-2009, 08:59 PM
i lost strawberry plants to a dog once. he ate them right out of a strawberry jar! i saw him chomping on them or i would never have believed it. --s6

Fenika
02-22-2009, 09:01 PM
I don't think I could live much further north of Delaware. Long growing seasons are to die for (and we're pretty average)

IRU, that doggie is trouble :)

And a bed of moss is amazing. Our backyard is mostly moss and ferns. I love walking barefoot after a good warm rain.

Fenika
02-22-2009, 09:03 PM
...do artificial ones count? I have two plastic pine branches with metal stems that I once removed from a thrown out Christmas tree. Stood upright they look like little trees. Been waitin' for birds to nest in 'em these last few years, but so far no takers.

If you want birds, you need a proper habitat. There's info on the Audubon's web page and other sites. Maybe a project for you for this year?

I'm trying to replace some of the landscaping around my mom's house with more native plants that provide food for birds. There's lots of wild growth at the edge of our property, and we've had robins, juncos, goldfinches, etc going crazy over it all winter.

We also have a butterfly bush for the summer :)

Ken
02-22-2009, 09:14 PM
If you want birds, you need a proper habitat. There's info on the Audubon's web page and other sites. Maybe a project for you for this year?

I'm trying to replace some of the landscaping around my mom's house with more native plants that provide food for birds. There's lots of wild growth at the edge of our property, and we've had robins, juncos, goldfinches, etc going crazy over it all winter.

We also have a butterfly bush for the summer :)

...never gave much thought to native plants serving as food for birds. Sounds like a cool project! There are robins by me, too, along with brown doves, bluejays, sparrows, and pigeons. Once in a rare while I spot a hawk.

Fenika
02-22-2009, 09:18 PM
Here's a shortlist- http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/Plants.html

:)

Plus natives are often easier to care for than ornamentals, and many have a simple elegance that can really look good in your back yard.

We've spotted Cooper's hawks, Bald eagles, vultures, and tons more around our yard. Something keeps killing the snow geese and feasting on them too. Then we see crows as well. They love the tall trees in our yard, and the fact that we are on a large pond helps.

Yay, birding derail :)

Amarie
02-22-2009, 09:19 PM
Goldfinches love coreopsis and a plant called perennial cornflower, Centaurea montana.

I want a small window box-size seedling starter, but I'm still shopping for one. I love California poppies but only have sporadic luck with them, so I'm thinking of starting them inside this year.

WerenCole
02-22-2009, 09:36 PM
I dated a gardener once. Girl was nuts.

WerenCole
02-22-2009, 09:37 PM
Has anyone tried growing strawberries in hanging baskets? It's something I'm going to try this year.


Try hanging baskets in strawberries. Much easier.

Wayne K
02-22-2009, 09:42 PM
We're getting ready for next month. We have blubreeze and Raspbreeze. The rest is subject to an Italian friend of mine who specializes in making gardens beautiful. From what I've seen he's really good at it.

trickywoo
02-22-2009, 09:44 PM
I'm planning to do tomatoes, green peppers, onions, and potatoes this year. Last year we had a container garden - mostly to test things out and keep the hungry critters away, but I think we might try a little plot this year.

I'd love to do a flower garden too, but I think that's too ambitious right now. We have a new baby due next week, so I'll be glad to get something planted. I probably won't plant until the end of April/early May, though.

I envy those of you planting fruit trees. That sounds delicious...and beautiful. Maybe someday.

Ken
02-22-2009, 09:45 PM
Here's a shortlist- http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/Plants.html

...of course if I plant a Spicebush there will be the temptation of eating the berries, myself :P // Thnx for the link :-)

shakeysix
02-22-2009, 10:09 PM
i live in an area that is very flat, very sandy. kansas is hot and windy most of the time. water doesn't last long, even the creeks dry up by july. but there are low spots between the sand hills that hold water for a longer time. sloughs we call them-- wild coreopsis, water buttercups, reeds, cat tails will grow there. the frogs start out as tiny peepers and then grow to sousaphones and tubas. red winged blackbirds and meadow larks nest there and snarf up the dragon flies. they are beautiful in the spring. the natural habitat here. i found a book that shows how to make a bog garden--bog sounds prettier than slough-- and i have a big side yard to fill but i don't want to mess with a pond and fish. fish attract raccoons. raccoons are as bad as sophomores in my book---s6

Fenika
02-22-2009, 10:10 PM
Goldfinches love coreopsis and a plant called perennial cornflower, Centaurea montana.


Thanks for the tip. I'm writing those down. I also need something that looks nice and grows in packed sandy soil. There's a spot in our yard that has been bare for YEARS. If I plant something with enough loosened soil near it, hopefully the plant can overcome the poor soil around it when older.


...of course if I plant a Spicebush there will be the temptation of eating the berries, myself :P // Thnx for the link :-)

No worries :)

Fenika
02-22-2009, 10:12 PM
i live in an area that is very flat, very sandy. kansas is hot and windy most of the time. water doesn't last long, even the creeks dry up by july. but there are low spots between the sand hills that hold water for a longer time. sloughs we call them-- wild coreopsis, water buttercups, reeds, cat tails will grow there. the frogs start out as tiny peepers and then grow to sousaphones and tubas. red winged blackbirds and meadow larks nest there and snarf up the dragon flies. they are beautiful in the spring. the natural habitat here. i found a book that shows how to make a bog garden--sounds prettier that slough-- and i have a big side yard to fill but i don't want to mess with a pond and fish. fish attract raccoons. raccoons are as bad as sophomores in my book---s6

That sounds lovely. Even the raccoons ;)

LaurieD
02-22-2009, 10:21 PM
This past fall I mixed my beds up a bit - moved my mixed Oriental and hybrid lilies (my avi is a photo of one of my now back bed lilies from last summer) to a back corner bed and planted "ditch" or wild lilies in the front (these are already about 2 inches above the soil). Near the driveway I planted Chinese paper lanterns - we'll see if those come up, they looked kind of gone when I planted them, though the woman I bought them from assured me hers looked the same initially and have now taken over the bed she put them in, so here's hoping.) I also have a rosebed that I have been filling over the last couple of years - reds, yellows, pinks, and a light purple. This year I'm planning on adding a dark red and a white and maybe another, color as of yet undecided. Several years ago we planted a pair of apricot trees in front of the house and last year we had our first fruits - which a frost promptly killed.

Maryn
02-22-2009, 10:21 PM
We have clay soil spade-able only to about a six-inch depth, with the associated drainage problems, plus deer and rabbits. There doesn't seem to be any point in gardening unless I also want to look out at a wire mesh fence.

I would like to add some more native plants, and possibly some additional ornamental grasses (the one which said it would be four feet tall is twice that) just for something to look at out back, where we have a windbreak of "trash trees" on one side and a vast grassland punctuated with neighbors' ugly storage sheds to the west. A few strategically-placed plantings would help. Anybody got earth-moving equipment?

Maryn, not much of a gardener at all

Sophia
02-22-2009, 10:31 PM
I also need something that looks nice and grows in packed sandy soil.


My book What Plant Where (http://www.amazon.com/What-Plant-Where-Roy-Lancaster/dp/0789401517/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235327463&sr=8-1) by Roy Lancaster suggests several shrubs that are tolerant of drought and rapid drainage, and favour sandy soils. Some I like are:

Ballota acetabulosa (Ballota)
Lavatera 'Barnsley' (Tree mallow)
Hibiscus syriacus 'Woodbridge' (Hibiscus)
Cytisus x praecox 'Allgold' (Broom)

shakeysix
02-22-2009, 10:33 PM
i have a ginormous tiller. i bought it years ago. i wanted one of those little mantis jobs but i let one of my old students talk me into godzilla tiller. he was a nice boy and i thought he could use the commission. the tiller is so big it has to be carried on a trailer. took me a whole year to pay it off. worse, i am terrified of the thing. i have to hire someone to use it---s6

Fenika
02-22-2009, 10:34 PM
Ohhhhh, awesome. I'm gonna look into those.

Sophia
02-22-2009, 10:38 PM
We have clay soil spade-able only to about a six-inch depth, with the associated drainage problems, plus deer and rabbits.

You could try Aster novi-belgii 'Marie Ballard', the Michealmas Daisy, which grows to one metre and which rabbits find unpalatable. It's gorgeous. Other tall plants are Lysimachia clethroides (Loosestrife) and Astilbe 'Ostrich Plume' (Astilbe). They are also rabbit-proof and like moist soil. All of these are perennials.

shakeysix
02-23-2009, 12:31 AM
i have my geraniums blooming in my classroom window--red and white. i like the single blooms better than the double. and coleus. i like geraniums and coleus together--a combo i got from a landlady of mine back in the seventies. --s6

Ol' Fashioned Girl
02-23-2009, 12:32 AM
Our herb garden survived another Oklahoma winter... the rosemary, bay, oregano, thyme, and parsley are all showing signs of life. Very soon, we'll put up the 'Wall-O-Waters' for the tomato plants. The bed is covered now with black plastic to keep out the grass and weeds and help warm up the ground. April 15th is the 'last frost date' for our area... and I'm SOooooooOOOO ready for a home-grown tomato!

I'll start haunting the Farmers Market soon, looking for the first ones up from Texas and in from the greenhouse growers. $3 a pound? $4? $5? What's money when you've got an addiction such as mine?

shakeysix
02-23-2009, 12:59 AM
paul james. the garden by the yard guy is from oklahoma city, right?--s6

Susan Gable
02-23-2009, 01:12 AM
Anybody tried those upside-down, hanging tomato planters?

I'd like to use those to grow my front-porch tomatoes this year. I am like the only person in my family who eats tomatoes, so one regular plant, and one cherry tomato plant keeps me happily in tomatoes all season long.

But I really like the idea of the hangy things. Anyone with experience with them?

Susan G.

Tepelus
02-23-2009, 01:17 AM
Last year I discovered a method of growing plants from seed called winter sowing. You take an empty gallon milk jug (or any clear, plastic container) and make mini greenhouses out of them. Cut holes in the bottom for drainage, slice the jug open about 3/4 of the way around, leaving one side as a hinge, fill with about 4 to 6 inches of potting mix (not soil) and sow the seeds as it says on the package. Close the container using duct tape to hold the top to the bottom, remove the cap for ventilation and to allow moisture to enter, and mark the container so you know what you planted. Take the container outside in a sheltered area, preferably somewhere where the sun doesn't shine on it all day, and wait for them to sprout when it gets warm. When they are big enough to handle, plant them in your garden. You can grow tons of plants this way for a whole lot less than buying full size plants. I have 16 containers outside right now of hardy perennial seeds, and the annuals will get started in about a month.

Daylilies are my thing too. Last year I bought about 130 different named cultivars and plan to cross a few. Also, when they begin to crowd each other out, I'll thin the clumps and sell the fans, making a little of my jingle back that I spent on the plants. Now what I need is a greenhouse, but that'll just have to be a dream for a while.

brad_b
02-23-2009, 01:23 AM
Anybody tried those upside-down, hanging tomato planters?

I'd like to use those to grow my front-porch tomatoes this year. I am like the only person in my family who eats tomatoes, so one regular plant, and one cherry tomato plant keeps me happily in tomatoes all season long.

But I really like the idea of the hangy things. Anyone with experience with them?

Susan G.

They work quite well, though you need to make sure they get enough water. As in any hanging basket, they need more frequent watering in the absence of rain since the evaporation rate is higher than for plants in the ground.

It's that time of year again in the Northern Hemisphere. As a landscaper this subject is always dear to my heart and one that provides many hours of enjoyment if done right. One of the ways to help keep the growing season more of a delight than a chore is companion gardening (http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html). This site is one of many that lists plants that help deter the bugs and critters while offering a variety of plants and flowers that complement each other. I believe companion gardening is well worth the time to look into for many reasons.

One of the many services I offer in my business is pond construction, pondless waterfalls, and wetlands. The basics for all are the same though each offers a wide variety of attraction. Bogs can be incorporated into a pond setting with a little extra effort and the plant variety adds to the setting. If constructed properly, ponds and aqua systems are relatively maintenance free and provide a habitat for many birds and other critters. I get most of my pond supplies from Aquascapes (http://www.aquascapeinc.com/) and they also offer 'how-to' videos on construction that help installation.

It's always a good idea to have a plan when gardening, no matter the size of the project. It helps keep the frustration level down and makes the season much more enjoyable.

Tepelus
02-23-2009, 05:40 PM
Here's a link to a winter sowing website to learn more, to any that are interested.

http://www.wintersown.org/

Ol' Fashioned Girl
02-23-2009, 05:45 PM
paul james. the garden by the yard guy is from oklahoma city, right?--s6

He's in Tulsa, I believe.

Fenika
02-23-2009, 08:15 PM
Thanks for the links and info folks. Interesting stuff :)

shakeysix
02-23-2009, 10:55 PM
anyone go in for goofy garden decor? in my part of the world you can always tell the catholics because of the garden statues of mary and st. francis. my dad had a st. francis. some of the grandkids were horsing around and broke st. francis's head off. dad fixed it with duct tape and glue but nothing held very well. my sibs and i were always putting his head in the birdbath, on top of the mailbox, on a picket in the the front gate like thomas moore's head--macabre but funny.

my worst folly is a concrete frog couple. they are making out, his hand is on her boob. tasteless but cute. the minute i spotted it i had to have it. my husband and kids hated it, but i still have it---s6

Ol' Fashioned Girl
02-23-2009, 10:58 PM
I'm mostly a birdfeeder / birdbath person. I've got three feeder poles and about 16 feeders. Birdbaths... mmm... lessee... five. And a fountain with heaters to keep the water flowing. Ol' Boy keeps me in check. :D

shakeysix
02-23-2009, 11:02 PM
the shop boys make birdfeeders for me out of scrap in the wood shop. i have seven or eight. thing is, i'm not very tall so they are all pretty low to the ground. technically they are as much cat feeders as bird feeders. nature is cruel--s6

Fenika
02-23-2009, 11:05 PM
My biggest 'sin' is a NO WAKE sign by the path to our 10' diameter pond. I found the sign floating in a cove of a much greater pond.

And I'm with OFG on the feeders. I have 5 up, including a finch sock. 2 suet feeders (one's a bbq 'cage' thingy), and a ton of food on the ground (very few of our birds pick the feeders, so the ground feeding has gone up). I've got one heated bucket of water, with a shelf inside. And of course there's the NO WAKE pond ;)

I bet I could convince my mom to put native plants instead of hostas around that pond this year...

Fenika
02-23-2009, 11:09 PM
technically they are as much cat feeders as bird feeders. nature is cruel--s6

Can you redesign/move things so that the cats can't sneak up and pounce? *Nature* is cruel, but fat domestic cats with nothing better to do than follow instincts is not natural but human induced.

We have a neighborhood cat that comes around but the birds can see him coming. I'm sure he's prolly gotten a few when I didn't see, but mostly he comes for the water. I've not seen him actually hunt, so I hope it is rare and unsuccessful. And ofc I chase him off when I see him.

Certain types of plant cover are good for birds and not as helpful for cats. Our holly trees are sparse enough to not hide a cat but give a bird tons of shelter.

Susan Gable
02-23-2009, 11:20 PM
They work quite well, though you need to make sure they get enough water. As in any hanging basket, they need more frequent watering in the absence of rain since the evaporation rate is higher than for plants in the ground.



Thanks, Brad. I'll bear that in mind. Most of the time I have a black thumb - not so great with the growing things. (Except for african violets. For some reason, I can grow those like crazy.)

Anybody have any advice for getting rid of a vine that will not die? I have a vine/weed thing in my front flower beds that has plagued me for a few years. I can pull the damn thing out until the cows come home, and a few days later, it will be back. I tried spraying with something or other last year, and that didn't make it die, either.

Why do the weeds grow so well, and the plants, not so much? :cry:

I also have a huge problem with ants, and they won't go away, either. I've tried to poison those suckers, and they just laught and go about their business.

This year I am going to rototill the flower beds to start with. They're a mess from severe neglect last year.

I'm just not good with this gardening stuff. (And I can't afford to hire a landscaper! LOL.)

Susan G.

Atani
02-24-2009, 12:10 AM
We like to do a big family garden with tomatoes, okra, beans of many types, peppers of many types, lots of lettuces, just about all the herbs you can think of, squash, and lots more I won't list... mostly because we won't be able to do it this year. Central Texas is experiencing quite a drought & it doesn't look like rain will be coming anytime soon. It's quite hard to water a garden the size of ours (not to mention expensive since we live in the city limits of our small town). We may do some Okra & squash though - both are pretty good for a hot, dry climate.

I always love growing basil, savory and thyme in half whisky barrels right outside my house though... love to make compound butters out of the flowers... sooo yummy.

Mr Flibble
02-24-2009, 12:20 AM
Anybody have any advice for getting rid of a vine that will not die?

Sounds like convulvous - you have to get the roots up or it takes over - it's an arse of a job. I keep getting it through the fence from my neighbours. Grr.

In better news I got most of my plants for the year today - including one of these (http://www.bakker.co.uk/r_90961-011/Foliage-shrubs/Chinese-Fringe-Bush.htm) which should perk up a dreary corner.

NeuroFizz
02-24-2009, 12:24 AM
To both Bahamut and Maryn (from way upstream), for both extremes of soil types (sandy and clay), work in some organic matter. If you have time before planing, use BS (steer manure), but if closer to planting use a fibrous mulch (won't burn new seedlings or transplants).

The smell of steer manure just reminds me of Spring.

Around our parts, we surface mulch our flower beds and lawn borders with pine straw, so it'll be time for that soon. It comes in bales (like hay bales). The local pine trees have the really long needles (6-9 inches long).

Mr Flibble
02-24-2009, 12:29 AM
We use mushroom compost round these here parts ( horse manure that's been used to grow mushrooms in, so it's nicely broken down but still has plenty of nutrients).

Fenika
02-24-2009, 12:31 AM
work in some organic matter.

Hm, I guess I could borrow the neighbor's rototiller :)

Also, unless I am mistaken, you should only mix clay and organic material in the planting areas and not where people walk, yes? Both hold moisture and will create more soup with foot traffic.

And I've got some lovely horse manure that's been sitting all winter. Not quite long enough, but it's free...

Fenika
02-24-2009, 12:32 AM
We use mushroom compost round these here parts ( horse manure that's been used to grow mushrooms in, so it's nicely broken down but still has plenty of nutrients).

Up north in mushroom country almost all the barns use straw, not shavings, because the mushroom folks will pick it up and haul it off free.

I didn't know you could in turn get it off the mushroom folks.

Siddow
02-24-2009, 12:42 AM
I'm moving up from a single pot on the back deck to four 4x8 raised beds for vegetables. I built them myself with cheap lumber ($12 a box), filled them with some fantastic soil/peat mix (black dirt! In Georgia!), mixed in some fertilizer, and now I'm waiting for mid-March.

I have three flats going in the basement under lights. So far, so good, but I had to pull some for legginess and restarted with more light.

We're planting red and yellow tomatoes, bush and pole beans, cucumbers, bell peppers, jalapenos, zucchini and yellow squash, several herbs, marigolds (for bugs), lettuce, romaine, carrots, radishes, collards, mustard, turnips, onions, I hope I have enough! :)

Fenika
02-24-2009, 01:03 AM
That sounds like quite a garden Siddow. Did you see the compliment gardening link on the last page?

And what kind of lights do you have going? T5/12s?

I need to pot my basil seedlings soon. A few of them are growing in a little clump and I hope I can save most. And I plan on keeping some lagers going and culling them once they have some tasty leaves on them :D

James81
02-24-2009, 01:36 AM
I'd love to have a space to do a garden. A real garden, full of vegetables of all kinds and not just a few plants here and there.

When I had a house, I would set out a couple tomato plants and squash plants. I loved it. Made sure I watered it everyday. I got plenty of tomatos and no squash.

I have a little yard in the back of my apartment and I might ask my landlord if I can put out some landscaping ties and set some plants out. It's in town, though, so who the heck knows what'll get into it.

Can't really bring myself to plant flowers. Unless anyone can recommend some good manly flowers. :tongue

Gary
02-24-2009, 02:11 AM
I've gone from a half-acre garden when I was a kid, to a quarter-acre when I was raising a family, to a single 8'X10' raised bed now that I'm retired.

I planted onion sets last week and potatoes are volunteering from my dug-in kitchen scraps. I'll plant tomatoes and peppers when it warms up, but probably nothing else.

My yard soil is iron ore, red clay and soft rock, so digging a hole big enough to plant a shrub takes 15-30 minutes, and needs lots of amendments. It's not much fun to garden up here on the hill.

Siddow
02-24-2009, 02:23 AM
I'm using these bulbs (almost this size, lol):
http://www.lightingsupply.com/get_image.aspx?file=5d4b16052f6540f7b7f4235454d022 c5

In these lamps:

http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/017398/017398346009md.jpg

I like the set-up, because I can easily move the lights closer or further, depending on the size of the seedlings. The beans were starting to send tendrils to wrap around the lamps. And then when seeding time is over, I can switch to regular bulbs and use the lamps as shop lights again.

Bookmarked the companion plant guide. Thanks!

Fenika
02-24-2009, 02:29 AM
Those look nice Siddow. I'm using this (http://www.amazon.com/Hydrofarm-4-Foot-Start-Light-System/dp/B0001XLSGQ/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1235427973&sr=8-3)beast, which I love, but I have to prop everything up on books or stools b/c the thyme is so big (and really, the thyme needs two-four more lights, but it will be outside soon)

I had all the garden space I wanted out in Oklahoma (and a planter box I had to leave behind, full of veggies and herbs), so I feel for you folks with less space. We just have a strip here, and some patches of partial shade to mostly sun.

Siddow
02-24-2009, 02:57 AM
That looks sweet! If my garden works out well this year, I may invest in a big permanent set-up. I have a big stainless table rescued from a restaurant that we use for clutter in the garage. I think I'd like to hang a long florescent fixture over it, on adjustable chains, so I can drop it for growing, and then raise it for regular shop work/clutter building the rest of the year.

Right now I have everything set up in my downstairs office, on a bench.

I have a good-sized yard with lots of sun, but our soil is such crap I figured it would be easier to build up than to amend down. This clay is like breaking up concrete.

Fenika
02-24-2009, 06:34 AM
Clay is just nasty. There was a fair bit on the 6 acres I used to own, but it wasn't too thick so I was lucky.

Carole
02-24-2009, 06:38 AM
My garden was terrible last year. Not sure what to do this year. It's really rocky here. I have plenty of land, and it gets plenty of sun, but the rock is awful.

Fenika
02-24-2009, 06:41 AM
Raised boxes! The roots can still go deeper if they insist, but don't skimp on the soil depth when filling.

Or plow up the rocks and build a nice wall :D

Siddow
02-24-2009, 05:40 PM
Raised boxes! The roots can still go deeper if they insist, but don't skimp on the soil depth when filling.

Or plow up the rocks and build a nice wall :D

I did that along the side of the house. Pulled out some major boulders, ended up having to backfill the bed with 1200lbs of dirt for all the rocks I removed.

But they made a nice natural edging. :)

I built very simple boxes. One cut, eight screws per box. Sorta like these: http://www.jeffnet.org/~hgpf/howto.htm. (http://www.jeffnet.org/%7Ehgpf/howto.htm)
But I used all 2x8x8 lumber, 3 pieces per box, and cut one piece in half. Slapped some wood protector on them, and tossed 'em in the yard. Each box took, no lie, about 15 minutes to make. They took considerably longer to fill.

Fenika
02-25-2009, 12:22 AM
Hehe, I guess it helps if you have a natural rise to plow up rocks on. I'm glad you got some nice edging out of it though ;)

The weather will be nice tomorrow and Thursday, so I'll be walking around making plans and getting some stuff done. Can't wait.

Sophia
02-25-2009, 01:44 AM
plow up rocks on.

This is just a cross-pond difference, but I wanted to check I had the right meaning of this. The image I get is of a tractor pulling a large rake that drags up rocks from a field. In a garden, do you mean picking out the stones, the ones that are typically an irregular, slightly rounded shape and about half the size of your palm, from an area of soil, and then building up a little barrier with them?

Fenika
02-25-2009, 01:55 AM
Depends on the size of what you want plowed up, and the size of your rocks.

So yeah, you can use your hands, a mule and plow, or a giant tractor with the right attachments, depending on your needs (and if there's a mule or tractor around)

In the post in question I was imagining a small tractor and a nice long strip of soon to be garden. So I guess we are sharing that image ;)

And I've seen some lovely gardens with all manner of stone wall around them.

Sophia
02-25-2009, 02:04 AM
Oh, stone walls, gorgeous... Part of an idyllic garden, for me.

Pagey's_Girl
02-25-2009, 03:40 AM
My late father was into gardening - problem is, he put in tons of hosta and daylilies all round the house - and this area is overrun with deer, who love both. His solution was to nag my mom into spraying everything with deer repellent just about every single day. Now my mom is looking into putting in plants that deer won't eat so readily. She's thinking of another butterfly bush, pink lilacs and looking at some ornamental grasses. She was considering cannas, but in Zone 5 you have to either dig them up in the fall or put them in containers that can be brought in.

I'm more of an indoor gardening type - I have close to a hundred houseplants. My oldest is a citrus tree (not sure what kind; I think it's a grapefruit) that grew from a seed I planted in a paper cup when I was eight. My ever-encouraging father kept telling me not to be disappointed when "nothing comes up." Last time I measured, "nothing" was over eight feet tall. Whole lotta nothing. :D. Apart from that, I've got the usual mix of snakeplants, spider plants, pothos, philodendrons, weeping figs, several crown of thorns in different colors, a couple of variegated peace lilies, crotons (this time, they WILL live and thrive and not break my heart, :) ) six hoyas, none of which have yet bloomed for me, a bunch of cacti and several orchids.

Oh, and of course, Rei Toei - the only little lady palm tree on earth named after a William Gibson character.

Tepelus
02-25-2009, 07:21 AM
I'd have a lot of house plants too if I didn't have cats that thought they had to eat them. I have a peace lily, two hoyas (one is setting flower buds) and a pot with a mix of pothos and arrowhead plant (I forget the real name). I have a fish tank that has a few live plants in it, but without a co2 unit, it's been hard to grow them lush, and to keep the algae away, and our well water is partially to blame for that. I have to use ro water or distilled, but money has been tight so the fish get well water.

As for plants that deer don't like, do a search on the i-net for deer resistant plants. A hungry deer will eat anything, but there are plants they will avoid in favor of plants they like better. The only things I can think of off the bat are a few bulb plants: daffodils and narcissus, hyacinths and any members of the allium family. A lady I worked with at a garden center once told me a recipe for deer repellent using eggs, but I can't tell you how to make it, it's been some time. Maybe a search on Google will bring something up.

And seriously folks, take a look at winter sowing. Before I discovered this, I was going to start my plants under lights, but since I'm cheap and discovered this technique, I will never grow from seed under lights unless the seeds cannot be grown this way. It'll save you money, your new babies will already be acclimated to the outdoors, you'll end up with more plants than you know what to do with (I had that problem with nicotiana last year), and it's fun!

Silver King
02-25-2009, 09:31 AM
This thread topic is a very cool idea that might be well suited for the Cooking forum.

It's welcome to stay here, of course, but if it loses steam down the road, and if the OP agrees with the change, we have another willing home for this discussion. :)

Tigercub
02-25-2009, 01:45 PM
i am here in my overalls and gloves, trowel in hand. on tuesday i am buying a house, my first in ten years. the yard is huge and blank! there is not even a tree. i am going to go slow because i could cobb things up if i don't think it out. this spring i am putting in fruit trees--apricot, peach, cherry. and a vegetable garden--some cosmos, zinnias and snaps of course, and a porch full of geraniums, maybe window boxes. eventually i want roses and a patio and maybe a bog garden---s6

I bought my very first house three years ago. Even before I moved out of my condo, I'd bought a rake for the yard. It came with a huge peach tree in the back yard, and there are so many other trees that there really isn't room to plant any new trees, although I plan to plant blueberries and raspberries.

I did some work out in the yard today. It was warm enough. Basically I clipped some dead leaves and scooped some fallen leaves away from my bulbs, which already have leaves popping up. Then I dumped stuff into my compost bin.

This year I plan more vegetables. I want to grow more potatoes, but I might not be able to afford seed potatoes. I'll grow (or try) peas, lettuce, carrots, broccoli, tomatoes, zucchini, spinach, and melons. Last year, after two years of failed zucchini, I worked in a lot of my homegrown compost and direct sowed the seeds. I had zucchini up the wazoo! So I guess the compost is the secret.

Sophia
02-25-2009, 03:23 PM
I'm quite fidgety about having plants indoors as we had a couple of infestations of those little black flies a couple of years ago. Now, everything's clear and I want to keep it that way. We have one supermarket-bought basil, and that's it as far as anything in soil goes. We grow cress and mustard in takeaway boxes, on a sheet of damp kitchen roll. They grow from seeds and are ready to eat after a week, and make for a tasty regular addition to potato salad and sandwiches.

Siddow
02-25-2009, 06:41 PM
I'm quite fidgety about having plants indoors as we had a couple of infestations of those little black flies a couple of years ago.

I end up with those buggers, too. One reasonable solution is to add a bit of dish detergent to the water when watering them, but the best solution I've found is to take them outside and repot with new soil, shaking off all the soil you can from the roots. Not so easy to do with fragile plants.

I built my bean trellis yesterday! I just need to add the nails for stringing, then mount it on the box and string 'er up! Whee! here's a few more of !these! cause I'm so excited!!!

brad_b
02-25-2009, 07:43 PM
In poorer soil, adding organic compost, organic peat, and other things of that nature do a lot to build up the nutrients. I also get a few bags of Miracle Gro potting mix and toss a few handfuls in when I plant, the extra nutrients get the roots off to a great start and result in a stronger and healthier plant. I've also noticed the flower sets I plant as borders do much better with a little Miracle Gro added than do those without.

ETA - a lot of topsoil bought by the bag has little nutrient value, so adding organics will result in a better mix, as does sand and vermiculite to loosen soil. I usually blend my own mix on a tarp while doing large plantings since a lot of soil has lost it's ability to support healthy plants. Adding a few handfuls of fetilizer is also a good way to get new plants off to a good start provided you don't overdo it. Too much commercial fertilizer will burn roots.

Sophia
02-26-2009, 12:56 AM
I was watching Gardener's World earlier today and they did a section on herb beds. They suggested planting tagates zenith (marigold) (http://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/pda_6aa8.html) in the bed as it is an insect repellent. It's also a gorgeous orange/red colour, which would really stand out and look amazing amongst the herbs. It's also resistant to rabbits and deer. :)

Pagey's_Girl
02-26-2009, 02:49 AM
This thread topic is a very cool idea that might be well suited for the Cooking forum.

It's welcome to stay here, of course, but if it loses steam down the road, and if the OP agrees with the change, we have another willing home for this discussion. :)

*In her best evil Paula Dean voice*

In that vein, dieffenbachia - aka dumbcane - makes a lovely addition to the meal of that one dinner party guest you wish would just shut the ^%$& up. :D

(JUST KIDDING, everyone - although I did have some fantasies about using it to shush a really obnoxious co-worker (cow-orker?) once. I wouldn't have done that to my dieffie, though....)

Siddow
02-26-2009, 03:07 AM
*plans to add a salad to next year's Thanksgiving dinner*

:D

Fenika
02-26-2009, 03:24 AM
This thread topic is a very cool idea that might be well suited for the Cooking forum.

It's welcome to stay here, of course, but if it loses steam down the road, and if the OP agrees with the change, we have another willing home for this discussion. :)

Alright, but when they start joking about eating the native birds we've been going on about, I'm sending you a grumbly PM :tongue


We grow cress and mustard in takeaway boxes, on a sheet of damp kitchen roll. They grow from seeds and are ready to eat after a week, and make for a tasty regular addition to potato salad and sandwiches.

What type of mustard seeds do you use and more details plz!

Cheers

Sophia
02-26-2009, 01:47 PM
What type of mustard seeds do you use and more details plz!

These (http://www.suttons.co.uk/Shop/Speedy+Seeds/Mustard+Speedy+Seeds+184720.htm) are the exact mustard seeds we use.

Take any shallow tray or box. Something about an inch deep is ideal.
Line it with a sheet or two of kitchen roll/tissue/flannel that has been moistened.
Sprinkle the seeds over it pretty generously, but don't have more than a single layer of seeds over the sheet.
Put a piece of thin card or paper over the tray until the seedlings are an inch high. (This takes around three days).
Remove the card and leave the tray sitting without it.
When the stems are around two inches high, you can harvest them; this will be after another three days or so.
Repeat with a fresh sheet of kitchen roll for your next batch.

Keep an eye on the kitchen roll throughout to make sure it doesn't dry out. We keep our tray on a table under a window; it doesn't seem to need any particular conditions. The seeds will be brown when you first take the card off, but will quickly become green once allowed sunlight.

Fenika
02-27-2009, 07:20 AM
Kewl, I will have to try that.

And hang on to your flower gardens folks, I feel an earthshake coming on.

Tepelus
02-28-2009, 01:21 AM
Do any of you have pictures of your gardens? I'll throw a few of my more favorite daylilies:

Celtic Voices
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Dayliles/daylilyCelticVoices7.jpg

Invitation To Immortality (in my Dracula themed daylily bed, and yes, I have Dracula, but he has yet to bloom)
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Dayliles/daylilyInvitationToImmortality002.jpg

Blueberry Lemonade
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Dayliles/dl027.jpg

Creature of the Night (in the Dracula bed too)
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Dayliles/daylilyCreatureoftheNight002.jpg

And a few others:

Helenium (two different colors)
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/helenium2.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/helenium.jpg

Phlox 'Delta Snow'
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/phloxDeltaSnow3.jpg

Dianthus 'Velvet 'N Lace'
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/dl045.jpg

Spring Azure butterfly on Hosta 'Summer Breeze'
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/butterflyBW.jpg

Hope you liked!

Fenika
02-28-2009, 07:32 AM
My lord Tapelus, you put us all to shame!

Lovely pics though. I feel spring in the air :D

Silver King
03-01-2009, 08:42 AM
This forum seems like a great place for this discussion. :)

Fenika
03-01-2009, 05:19 PM
Alright then. My basil sproutlings are getting their wee leaves. Soon I'll have fresh basil to put on everyyyyyyyything. Mmmmmmmmm.

And I think I killed my first avocado tree by over-trimming. I'm waiting for the other two seeds to sprout and I'll be sticking them in soil straight away. Of course, I have to wait 10 years for the fruit ;)

dolores haze
03-01-2009, 05:30 PM
*looks out of the window at the foot of frozen snow...sighs...and dreams of Spring*

shakeysix
03-01-2009, 07:07 PM
it is 9* here! damn it all!--s6

Fenika
03-01-2009, 08:43 PM
We've got a cold front too, which is why I'm thankful for my plant light. Grow little basilings, growww.

;)

Tepelus
03-02-2009, 06:20 AM
Aren't seedlings so cute?

Pagey's_Girl
03-02-2009, 07:41 PM
Anyone want to see one of my windows last week? The orchid on the left, with the maroon and white flowers, smells like chocolate. :D.
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d81/ladymadrigal/Picture005.jpg

Some cute little succulents in bloom from earlier this year..
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d81/ladymadrigal/Picture007.jpg

My amaryllis from Christmas:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d81/ladymadrigal/Picture008.jpg

One of my Christmas cacti - this one came from Stop & Shop a few years ago:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d81/ladymadrigal/Picture009.jpg

And the TV - yeah, that's the current northeast radar behind the anthurium and Kentia palm...and yeah, a plush chicken in the corner.... :)
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d81/ladymadrigal/Picture011.jpg

Fenika
03-02-2009, 09:09 PM
Oh wow, you've got a lot of plants.

I repotted more basil, and the first batch is looking good.

The house plants are doing well and oblivious to the snow outside. Brrr.

Tepelus
03-02-2009, 09:59 PM
I like your orchids. I wish I could grow them, but they are one of the few plants that don't like me.

James81
03-03-2009, 05:20 PM
lol what is this thread doing in this forum?

Fenika
03-03-2009, 05:23 PM
Silver King likes to keep me out of Office Party ;)

And aside from OP, this was the only other fit. 1/3 of our topics are food related. Almost. The rest are houseplants and planting for native animals and random. What can you do?

Conquering Challenges maybe? The unloved lovechild of OP...

Carole
03-06-2009, 08:10 AM
Last year I had the science experiment gone wrong holy mother of PETE of all gardening experiments.

Fun fact: My dirt is filled with gravel-like rocks, and almost nothing likes it.

Everything started out ok, but then things went terribly, terribly wrong. (And I am known for being able to grow anything anywhere!)

Corn sprouted up to the sky, but then the ears stopped short of about two inches long.

Cucumbers were twisted little mutants.

Peppers--what peppers?

Cantaloupe reached the astonishing size of a baseball.

Potatoes did great while they lived, but I only got a couple of rounds of new potatoes before everything crapped out.

Lettuce. ha!

Cabbage. Double ha!

Several different varieties of tomatoes, and none of them were worth eating.

Onions did ok, but remained very small

Strawberries didn't even survive the transplanting.

That being said, all my herbs loved it. Basil, oregano, dill, thyme, two rosemary bushes (those even survived this awful winter), chamomile--all of the herbs were fine. Also, for some reason yellow squash also seemed to love that dirt. I had squash all summer.

I have no idea what to do this year short of getting out there with a sieve and sifting out all the rocks. It's very disappointing because I have this huge yard and my garden was the laughing stock of the neighborhood. There was no need for scarecrows--even the crows didn't want anything to do with it!

But . . . the little lilac bush I planted out front last year is beginning to bud up (even though I flattened it with the truck last summer!), the tulips and paperwhites I planted in the fall are out of the ground and there isn't an Iris shoot in sight which tells me that I was successful in ridding my boxes out front of them. I love Irises--in other people's yards. I hate dealing with them myself because after they bloom, you're left with what looks like weeds on steroids.

Tepelus
03-09-2009, 06:46 PM
I have to deal with rock hard clay in the dry months in summer, and in spring the swamp that forms every time we get a full day's worth of rain. When the yard floods, I start to panic that my flowers will drown. If I want to have more beds, I will have to bring in more dirt and create little 'islands' so when the yard floods, the flowers won't drown, or build raised beds. Last winter was the worst, in February the snow melted and it rained for two or three days non-stop, and the ground didn't have time to thaw. Here's the results:

The back yard
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/2-6-083.jpg

The front yard
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/2-6-085.jpg

It took two months for all the water to finally drain. Bleh! I lost a small lilac bush and a pair of dogwood trees, but most of the flowers survived.

Fenika
03-09-2009, 08:40 PM
While that does suck, it's very pretty. Have you called the county or someone about putting in a drain or underground river system???

Fenika
03-15-2009, 05:23 AM
I'll be harvesting basil tomorrow :D Technically a late cull, but it's working out nice. Can't wait.

LaurieD
03-15-2009, 05:35 AM
Despite our cold snap, my ditch lilies have continued to grow and are about 6 inches tall, my bed of mixed lilies has started to pop through the soil, my rose bed has a bunch of new growth, and even my bleeding heart is coming back - I thought we lost it when we had a plumbing problem flood where my 'heart is planted and it died. Or I thought it died. Still haven't seen any sign of life from my paper lanterns I planted last fall.

Mr Flibble
03-15-2009, 01:09 PM
Got most of my stuff planted.

Have also informed the dog if he eats / digs up any of them, we're having dog pie for dinner :D

Fenika
03-15-2009, 04:28 PM
Sounds gamey. Better start growing some extra herbs to go with that pie :D

Sarita
03-15-2009, 09:24 PM
Goodness, where do you people live? Here in the North East, we're still dead scared of another snow until at least April. :-)

I have a big batch of spring bulbs to plant in the front and back gardens. And my vegetable garden is going to be a bit different this year. I'm going to stake and tie ropes to the deck stairs, which are right next to my garden so that all my viney things can grow up there instead of weaseling around my other stuff after they'd exhausted the little lattices I used to provide. Not sure what I'm planting yet... cukes, squash, beets, tomatoes, taters, loads of herbs...

Branwyn
03-15-2009, 09:29 PM
Agree, Sarita. I'm excited to see my little daffodils sprouting. Don't know what happened to the crocus this year. I managed to kill 2 rosemary plants this winter. My home is like a jungle and I love it. Can't wait to bring my gardenia outside, it's hanging on by a thread.

GeorgeK
03-15-2009, 10:01 PM
Here's a shortlist- http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/Plants.html

:)

Plus natives are often easier to care for than ornamentals, and many have a simple elegance that can really look good in your back yard.

We've spotted Cooper's hawks, Bald eagles, vultures, and tons more around our yard. Something keeps killing the snow geese and feasting on them too. Then we see crows as well. They love the tall trees in our yard, and the fact that we are on a large pond helps.

Yay, birding derail :)

Here snapping turtles take most of the goslings and bobcats took all the turkeys and half the adult geese. Hawks took all the guineas. We have a few wiley chickens and geese left. Piglets like to get through the fence and feed the coyotes, much to the consternation of the Pyranees guard dogs who can't get through the fence. Lambs can get through the fence too, but they're smarter than the piglets.

Fenika
03-15-2009, 10:36 PM
Goodness, where do you people live? Here in the North East, we're still dead scared of another snow until at least April. :-)

I'm in Delaware, but I got a plant light (details upthread). Not sure what I'm gonna do when I move. Two to three days of driving and then scrambling to find housing can't be good for my basilings. Maybe I'll just start some seedlings before I go and haul that across the US.


Don't know what happened to the crocus this year.

My neighbors have some lovely crocus in bloom :)


Here snapping turtles take most of the goslings and bobcats took all the turkeys and half the adult geese. Hawks took all the guineas. We have a few wiley chickens and geese left. Piglets like to get through the fence and feed the coyotes, much to the consternation of the Pyranees guard dogs who can't get through the fence. Lambs can get through the fence too, but they're smarter than the piglets.

Poor dogs. I know how lgds worry too, having owned an Anatolian cross. At least the ecosystem around you is thriving :D

In the spring here the mallards always start with a dozen or more ducklings and then there's less each week or each day. I saw a large pair of mallards in our yard this morning, enjoying my bird food. They'll be nesting soon, so I guess I can spare some food :)

maestrowork
03-15-2009, 11:05 PM
I've harvested with all my AeroGarden crop of mint, basil, and oregano. Now I'm growing sage, parsley, and chives.

Next on the list would be cherry tomatoes. Yum.

GeorgeK
03-16-2009, 12:30 AM
Poor dogs. I know how lgds worry too, having owned an Anatolian cross. At least the ecosystem around you is thriving :D
:)

Yes, it is and actually it is fun to listen to the hawks. Not many people (at least in America in the 20th and 21st Century) can say that they've even heard hawks, yet alone to go outside and expect to hear them. At night are the tree frogs and actually being able to see the Milky Way. The builder wanted to fill in the ditch in the front yard at the end of construction but we said, "No, the animals love the puddle!"

shakeysix
03-21-2009, 07:42 PM
i started moving into my new house last week. i'm still foundering in a sea of unpacked boxes and unshelved books but a neighbor has offered to bring his tractor in to plow a garden plot. i am thinking vegetables and a few cosomos, zinnias and snaps fopr cutting. i bought the sunflower forest seeds from burpee and can't wait to plant it. i always wanted to do this for the g-kids but never had the room before. i'm thinking watermelon, carrots, tomatoes, peppers, bush beans--all things magnolia, who is three, can help to harvest. the florida g-daughter will be out this summer. i'll have both girls for about ten days. besides swimmimg, library and riding lessons there isn't much to do out here. i'm hoping a tent in the center of a sunflower forest will keep them entertained.

it has been very, very dry but it rained last night, enough to make puddles in the street. this morning the birds were having a swimming party. if i can unload six more boxes i will plant petunias and black eyed susan vine for the front porch---s6

blacbird
03-22-2009, 12:08 AM
Got most of my stuff planted.

It was -4F at my house this morning. There remains a foot of snow in my yard, with multiple moose tracks crossing it. The bastuds are just waiting for my garden, scheming, planning, conspiring, I know it. But they'll have to wait until mid-May at the earliest. Nobody here plants outdoors before then.

caw

LaurieD
03-22-2009, 04:46 AM
My second apricot tree has blossomed and the neighborhood lawns have erupted in this nasty smelling purple flowering weed - I think it's called chickweed or something - for the first time in the 10 years we've lived here, our purple weed is brown and dying!

*Sniff, I'm so happy*

Tepelus
03-22-2009, 07:04 AM
I think I know what weed you're talking about. I think it's called creeping charlie, but I'm not completely sure. I hate it too. I winter sowed some perennials outside in milk jugs and I have sprouts of snow-in-summer in one of them. If we keep getting warm days, it'll be a matter of weeks before all my milk jugs are full of wee seedlings. Yeah spring!

shakeysix
03-22-2009, 05:35 PM
that smelly purple weed might be henbit. we have a field of it across the street. kind of an eyesore, but not as bad as my neighbor's eight foot tall privacy fence which has cow skulls nailed to it and 2 big "no trespassing" signs. they call her scary mary. i'm not knocking on her door to ask her why---s6

StephanieFox
03-22-2009, 08:17 PM
We've been veggie gardening for about 10 years. We used to live in the 'hood and I just started planting in a vacant lot where the crack house had been. When we moved, the Youth Farm took it over.

Now we live in a lovely neighborhood. Our back yard is small and about half of it is shaded by a very large ash tree. The sunny half has been dug up and is now a 12'x12' vegetable garden. We eat out of it all summer, then blanch and freeze greens, etc. We are still eating those greens and will till the next crop comes in in the summer

The ground here is still frozen and the last frost date is May 15, but then we'll plant. I can't wait. It's great to step outside the back door to gather dinner.

blacbird
03-22-2009, 11:17 PM
Addendum to my preceding post: Woke up to six inches of new snow this morning, and still coming down.

caw

StephanieFox
03-23-2009, 03:48 AM
lol what is this thread doing in this forum?

It's a garden plant before it's lunch.

Fenika
03-23-2009, 04:20 AM
That was posted back when we were talking orchids and nonedibles.

And prolly while we were talking wild birds. ... *sings* I love goldfinches b/c they're so delicious. Gone goldfinching.

:D

Fenika
03-23-2009, 04:21 AM
Oh, and in other news, my basil has yellow spots :( Gonna run a leaf to the garden center tomorrow.

blacbird
03-23-2009, 11:02 AM
Oh, and in other news, my basil has yellow spots :( Gonna run a leaf to the garden center tomorrow.

Yeah. They'll really like that. Contaminate all their other herbs.

Meantime, we finished with 10 inches of snow today at my house. It's supposed to get above freezing, barely, on Wednesday.

caw

Tepelus
03-23-2009, 04:26 PM
I'm wondering, Bahamut, if maybe your basil has spider mites. Check for webbing or teeny tiny bugs on the undersides of the leaves. If they are spider mites, use a mix of dish soap and water and spray them all over. That would be the safest way to get rid of bugs on food intended to be consumed. Dry air is what attracts spider mites, so keeping the air moist by misting or using a humidifier will help.

Fenika
03-23-2009, 05:10 PM
Mites are possible, but I have been spritzing the leaves. I did a little research and found out that's a no-no. One of the leaves has black spots on the edge now, so I guess that's the one I'll zip up and take in. I'm guessing fungus, but I'll keep mites in mind. Cheers

Carole
03-24-2009, 08:52 PM
I did that along the side of the house. Pulled out some major boulders, ended up having to backfill the bed with 1200lbs of dirt for all the rocks I removed.

But they made a nice natural edging. :)

I built very simple boxes. One cut, eight screws per box. Sorta like these: http://www.jeffnet.org/~hgpf/howto.htm. (http://www.jeffnet.org/%7Ehgpf/howto.htm)
But I used all 2x8x8 lumber, 3 pieces per box, and cut one piece in half. Slapped some wood protector on them, and tossed 'em in the yard. Each box took, no lie, about 15 minutes to make. They took considerably longer to fill.

That's a great idea! I did that last year with my strawberries, but for a different reason. Dad tells me that strawberries will take over your whole garden if you don't keep them contained, and so I built a box for them. Unfortunately, they didn't do squat either, but that is probably because I focused more on keeping them separated than raising them higher than the ground level. My box wasn't very deep.


Raised boxes! The roots can still go deeper if they insist, but don't skimp on the soil depth when filling.

Or plow up the rocks and build a nice wall :D
I would LOVE to do that. I don't really know how to accomplish it, though, because in although we do have lots of big rocks, most of it is gravel-sized. I swear, it's almost like someone had this entire yard filled with gravel at one time and then it settled into the ground.

Carole
03-24-2009, 08:58 PM
Goodness, where do you people live? Here in the North East, we're still dead scared of another snow until at least April. :-)

I have a big batch of spring bulbs to plant in the front and back gardens. And my vegetable garden is going to be a bit different this year. I'm going to stake and tie ropes to the deck stairs, which are right next to my garden so that all my viney things can grow up there instead of weaseling around my other stuff after they'd exhausted the little lattices I used to provide. Not sure what I'm planting yet... cukes, squash, beets, tomatoes, taters, loads of herbs...

I bought some caladium (http://www.easytogrowbulbs.com/ProductImages/caladiums/CaladiumPostmanJoyner2.jpg) bulbs this morning. The whole front of the house stays shaded pretty much all day, so nothing grows in my planter boxes along the porch very well. These are very colorful, and they are supposed to do well in shade. I don't know how much they spread out, though. I want those boxes filled up with color this year. Does anyone know how much they will spread? I bought 24 bulbs, and I think I might need more.

Mr Flibble
03-24-2009, 09:06 PM
Goodness, where do you people live? Here in the North East, we're still dead scared of another snow until at least April. :-)



Gulf Stream baby!

I live in the South of England. We're lucky if we get snow once every five years, and it's usually gone by lunchtime. This week it's been sunny and in the sixties all week. Very nearly shorts weather.

You hate me, don't you? Don't worry, while you're enjoying a summer, I'll have one sunny day in June and that'll be it...

StephanieFox
03-24-2009, 10:38 PM
Oh, and in other news, my basil has yellow spots :( Gonna run a leaf to the garden center tomorrow.

Put it in a baggie before you show it to them. I hope they can help. Basil is one of my favorites.

Pagey's_Girl
03-25-2009, 01:18 AM
I'm wondering, Bahamut, if maybe your basil has spider mites. Check for webbing or teeny tiny bugs on the undersides of the leaves. If they are spider mites, use a mix of dish soap and water and spray them all over. That would be the safest way to get rid of bugs on food intended to be consumed. Dry air is what attracts spider mites, so keeping the air moist by misting or using a humidifier will help.

Even just a good thorough spraying with the sink sprayer can knock down spider mites for good - it worked wonders on my hibiscus. I've also used Safer to get rid of them - it's very effective and safe for indoor use, too.

Carole
03-25-2009, 07:55 AM
If I plant this year--and that's a big if--I need to get my spring veggies out right away. It's time for potatoes, cabbage, lettuce (most all greens) carrots, onions and peas to get into the ground if they are going to do anything at all this year. Last year, I waited until April (I think it was April) to put out lettuce, potatoes and cabbage and none of them produced much of anything. The heads on my lettuce and cabbage never got bigger than golf balls. I know it was partly due to the rocky ground, but once it gets into April around here, we start getting HOT days. And those guys just won't grow well in east Tennessee stagnant heat.

MaryMumsy
03-25-2009, 09:31 AM
You guys have me in awe. I'm so proud that I've kept a basil plant alive for a month. My husband is the gardener (I have two black thumbs and eight black fingers). He has so much to do with the ornamentals that I don't want to ask him to take on more. Plus we have rabbits living in our yard. I'm sure they would love for us to plant a vegetable garden.

MM

blacbird
03-25-2009, 10:48 AM
If I plant this year--and that's a big if--I need to get my spring veggies out right away. It's time for potatoes, cabbage, lettuce (most all greens) carrots, onions and peas to get into the ground if they are going to do anything at all this year. Last year, I waited until April (I think it was April) to put out lettuce, potatoes and cabbage and none of them produced much of anything. The heads on my lettuce and cabbage never got bigger than golf balls. I know it was partly due to the rocky ground, but once it gets into April around here, we start getting HOT days. And those guys just won't grow well in east Tennessee stagnant heat.

It hurts my soul to say this, but you're just trying to grow the wrong stuff. Where you live, you should concentrate on tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, collards, green beans, squash, sweet potatoes, New Zealand spinach (not regular spinach, which is unrelated). In other words, all the stuff I can't grow where I live. I, on the other hand, can do potatoes, carrots, every variety of cabbage family plant, peas and lettuce quite nicely. But I can't make the stuff I just recommended to you work worth dog spit. Damn spherical world and its polar tilt all to hell.

caw

Fenika
04-12-2009, 05:52 AM
I killed most the new batch of basil seedlings :cry: I've been running around, and they looked fine, but I didn't check the peat moss, and now ... :cry:

Of the older basil, only one pot looks really good and I'm taking that one to OK and praying it survives the road trip.

And since I'm moving into an apartment with a tiny outside space, I'm guessing my garden won't be as expected. Maybe some banana peppers...

Siddow
04-12-2009, 06:42 AM
I've got carrots, radishes, collards, mustard, turnips, romaine, four other types of lettuces, broccoli, green onions and bulb onions growing like crazy. We had a freak snow storm last week that nailed all but two of my beans (I had them covered with plastic and blankets, I swear!), but oddly enough, my cilantro held strong. Wasn't expecting that. :)

A couple of neighbors have stopped by to inquire about my raised beds, which is flattering.

blacbird
04-12-2009, 07:38 AM
If I plant this year--and that's a big if--I need to get my spring veggies out right away. It's time for potatoes, cabbage, lettuce (most all greens) carrots, onions and peas to get into the ground if they are going to do anything at all this year. Last year, I waited until April (I think it was April) to put out lettuce, potatoes and cabbage and none of them produced much of anything. The heads on my lettuce and cabbage never got bigger than golf balls. I know it was partly due to the rocky ground, but once it gets into April around here, we start getting HOT days. And those guys just won't grow well in east Tennessee stagnant heat.

I hate to say this, Carole, but methinks you're just trying to grow the wrong things, much as you might like them. Me, I live in a cool climate with a short growing season (Alaska), and the veggies you cite (peas, cabbage, potatoes, lettuce) all work fabulously. BUT, I have a hell of a time with tomatoes, peppers, even summer squash. THEM is what you need to concentrate on, along with okra, eggplant, New Zealand spinach (which is not a true spinach, but a great hot-climate substitute; I used to grow it when I lived in Dallas, Texas). Collards are a great green to grow where you live, and mustard would grow on the moon.

From my Dallas gardening experience, some recommendations:

Gypsy peppers; a sweet pepper slightly smaller than grocery store bell peppers, but fabulously productive and with a wonderful flavor. Other bell peppers should succeed, as well.

Any hot pepper variety you like. Any variety of tomato or eggplant. They're all in the same family of tropical-origin plants. Also tomatilloes, one of the great secrets of gardening and culinary delight.

Summer squashes other than (or in addition to) zucchini. Many varieties exist, and have delightful variations in flavor.

Winter squashes, of any variety. They need a long season, with some heat, to do well. Ditto for pumpkins, which are basically the same thing.

Beans. Another thing I struggle with. Peas are cool-weather legumes. Beans are mostly hot-weather legumes.

Asparagus peas. An utterly delightful legume that isn't actually a pea, but is eaten as small whole pods. It has attractive blood-red flowers as well, and a spreading habit, good in pots for both eating and decoration.

Nasturtiums. Grown mostly for flowers, and excellent for such, but the flowers are wonderfully edible, and terrific in salads. Colorful, exotic, and with a honey-mustard spiciness that enhances any salad dressing. Works well in pots, too.

Sweet potatoes/yams. Can't grow them where I live, but you could, if you can develop soil that will work for root veggies.

That's a start. Keep us posted on how your garden grows.

caw

shakeysix
04-12-2009, 07:59 PM
hey--watch those tomatillos. they can take over fast. the same with those #$%% patty pan squashes. they even colonized a gravel driveway!

i've never been able to get a nasturtium to thrive. if they come up at all they are weak and floppy until the heat finally gets them. i would trade all the chiles and zinnias in my garden for a tubfull of climbing nasturtiums like i used to see in iowa. the same with egg plants and sweet peas. westen kansas is not the place for them.

sunflowers are a weed here--all over the place but i am planting a sunflower forest for the g-kids. and strawberries but only in jars. strawberries can be invasive. they overtook a rose garden after i planted them as a border. now i use fennel and parsley for a border. it's raining here--third wet weekend for stafford county. a blizzard--a mini blizzard and now steady rain. as soon as it clears up the tractor guy will do his job and i'll be in business! carrots, tomatoes, peppers, brussel sprouts, melons and beans for business. snaps, cosmos, wild carrot, daisies, shirley poppies and delphiniums for fun. and herbs--marjoram, lavender, rosemary and a tubfull of basil---s6

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-12-2009, 08:09 PM
The tomatoes here in Oklahoma are looking fabulous - even though a freeze tried to get 'em last weekend. Wall-O'-Water is the bees knees.

Just for grins, we bought a 'Topsy-Turvy' tomato planter to hang on the deck (the other ten plants won't come near to keeping my addiction supplied). We've seen the infomercial and heard 1st person testemony from acquaintences (good from the former, bad from the latter). We put two Beefmaster tomato plants with stems the size of pencils in yesterday. I'll keep y'all posted. :)

jennontheisland
04-12-2009, 08:20 PM
There is still a 4 foot high pile of snow in my new back yard. It should be gone in a couple weeks though, and the new roomie and I are planning herbs and flowers. She wants pretties to look at and I want things to eat and make bath stuff with.

It's a small yard, but I might try doing the hanging garden my sister did for a project in Urban Agriculture... lattice hung with reused plastic bags as containers for lettuces and small root veggies (I like beet greens more than the beets themselves).

shakeysix
04-13-2009, 05:16 PM
please report back on the topsy turvy termater. i've heard mixed reviews on them. i grow beefmaster too. and jet star---s6

Soccer Mom
04-13-2009, 09:50 PM
Gah! My son's horse decided my cilantro looked delicious. :( I'm not sure if there is enough left to save. At least the tomatos and all the various cucurbits look good.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-13-2009, 10:08 PM
Update on the Topsy-Turvey tomato... that bugger is HEAVY. Once it's filled with dirt and a gallon of water, it's quite substantial to lift - even with the rope and pulley arrangement Ol' Boy rigged up for my convenience.

We placed it on the east side of the deck, hanging from the outer-most joist, about two feet from the latice wall that faces north. It'll get morning sun, and in afternoon and evening will be protected by shade cloth and lattice to the west.

It's not so heavy, however, that the wind couldn't blow it around. I'm thinking that once it's loaded with fruit, I'm going to go nuts trying to keep it from bashing into the deck walls and smashing the tomatoes. Must find a way to tie it off when I know the winds are going to be strong...

Planting was kinda delicate, too... you've got to have a third hand to hold the tomatoes in the proper position while you're filling the planter with dirt - but there's not much room for it to manuver around. We looked like two monkeys trying to figure out how to play football for a bit, but we got 'er done.

I'll check it tonight and let y'all know if there are any big tomatoes on it yet. :D

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-13-2009, 10:13 PM
I guess I should also say something about cost:

Topsy-Turvey: $9.99
Potting Soil: $5.49 (Got the Miracle Grow with the special water-saving pellets in it)
Jobes Tomato fertilizer stakes: $1.99
Two Beefmaster tomato plants: $2.38
Rope: $6.95
Pulley: $1.49
Cleet: $.99

Total, w/tax: $31.84

Fenika
04-13-2009, 11:36 PM
I guess I should also say something about cost:

Topsy-Turvey: $9.99
Potting Soil: $5.49 (Got the Miracle Grow with the special water-saving pellets in it)
Jobes Tomato fertilizer stakes: $1.99
Two Beefmaster tomato plants: $2.38
Rope: $6.95
Pulley: $1.49
Cleet: $.99

Total, w/tax: $31.84

Watching you make a football monkey of yourself: Priceless :D

Post pics!

Sorry about the cilantro SMom.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-14-2009, 01:31 AM
I didn't take any pics, smartypants! :)

Fenika
04-14-2009, 07:25 AM
Video? ;)

And hang on to your cake walks and other okie phrases, I'm leaving for OK tomorrow. Wish my basil and feral chives a safe trip. I'm taking an avocado too, but it hasn't sprouted yet so no worries

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-14-2009, 03:32 PM
Travel safe, kid. We'll try to stir up some weather for you as a welcome! :D

Soccer Mom
04-14-2009, 11:28 PM
Travel safely, Bahat! BTW: cilantro has apparently survived. :)

JanDarby
04-15-2009, 01:31 AM
I've done the upside-down tomatoes thing, and wasn't impressed.

I should say that we used regular buckets with a hole cut in the bottom, not the commercially sold product, but the gist of it was the same. The plants were anemic, and the harvest was about ten percent (if that) of what the same variety of plants produced in the ground. Plus, they needed daily watering, unlike plants in the ground that don't need watering more than once a week, if that, around here.

Our results may have been affected somewhat by the fact that I'm an organic gardener, so I don't use fertilizer (other than compost/manure). OTOH, we had six matching plants, put two in the hanging set-up and four in the ground, and neither group got fertilizer, yet the ones in the ground did massively better than the hanging ones.

Also, we found that anything larger than a grape/cherry tomato was too heavy for the hanging branches, some of which broke. I'm not sure why, but it was more of a problem for the hanging plants than the ones in the ground.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-17-2009, 10:33 PM
I'm betting my experience will be identical to yours. I don't know where you are, but here in Okieville, it's hot and windy - which will suck the moisture right outta those babies. They look strong now, already curling upward to find the sun, but we're just getting started and the weather's been cool.

Did you have any trouble with spider mites? Those are the worst down here... I can handle the heat and the water, but the bloody spider mites are the kiss of death.

shakeysix
04-18-2009, 12:52 AM
i was thinking about an upside down tomato because i have a covered porch but i'm also the last house in town and the south wind has been very strong. don't think i will risk it this year. thanks for the warnings. i might have been killed by flying tomatoes while sitting on my glider--s6

Soccer Mom
04-18-2009, 01:02 AM
Keep me updated. My eldest has seen the upside down tomatos and is all hot for the idea. I've pointed out that I'm already growing them IN THE GROUND. I don't intend to plant more, but I'll keep him informed with your progress.

BTW: The horse finally managed to get my cilantro when my back was turned. Sneaky girl. She also ate my coreopsis flowers.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-19-2009, 11:24 PM
Well, there was a threat of wind with the storms that rolled through yesterday, so Ol' Boy created a brace for the Topsy-Turvey plants.

He made it out of scrap lumber, a bungee and a couple eye-hooks we already had, but we had to spend another $3.30 for a hinge...

Worked like a charm.

So... to date, total: $35.14

I'll post a pic after my nap. :D

Fenika
04-19-2009, 11:39 PM
Heh, I slept through the worst of it at 3am :)

The basil is not happy but hopefully will recover. Chives are good. Avocado may never 'hatch' at this rate. I have a small yard so I'm thinking banana peppers and something ornamental, easy, and good for the birds

LaurieD
04-19-2009, 11:39 PM
Thanks for the Topsey Turvey update OFG - we've been thinking about getting a couple. My husband saw them at WalMart for $10 the other day.

My ditch lilies are doing well, a handful have buds.

The bleeding hearts I potted - one is doing really well and has grown a couple of inches and had it's first blossoms this week. The other one blossoms, then the leaves wither, then the blossoms wither, then the branch withers. The soil (Miracle Grow potting soil) is moist, it's in partial shade. I have no idea what's wrong with it.

My miniature roses are doing well, but I lost 3 of my regular size roses over the winter. :( I picked up a new one, planted it, missed a freeze warning, and it suffered.

The mixed lilies I had moved in the fall seem to be coming up pretty well, about 2/3 of them have made an appearance. This spring when I cleared the leaves off the bed, there was a suspicious lump through the center of the bed (which is now bare of lilies) so I'm thinking my bulbs made a crunchy snack for a mole or two.

Still no sign of the paper lanterns I planted last fall.

My apricot trees both budded earlier, smelled so sweet, and have now leafed out. :D They were hit really hard with the ice storm we had 11/07 and were kind of scraggly for a while last year but seem to have recovered.

Tepelus
04-20-2009, 01:28 AM
I spent a good deal of Thursday and Friday digging in the compost pile, mixing horse manure with the compost and spreading it throughout the gardens. I'm still not done, but I ran out of steam and this weekend looks nice, so I'll finish the rest then. Hauled wheelbarrow loads of compost/manure mixture and laid a 6 inch layer around my dogwood tree, creating a new bed 6 ft in diameter for new hostas and heuchera I'll be getting in May. Should be settled enough to plant by then. The robins went to town on the worms in the compost, easy pickins. All but a few of my daylilies survived the winter. Those that didn't are getting replaced. The perennials I started from seed last year are growing like weeds. I'm anticipating lots of new blooms this year. I have 30 milk jugs outside with seeds planted in them, half of them have germination of various degrees, from a jug full of babies to just a few sprouts. Most of my daylily seeds I crossed last year have germination, from 100% to nothing. Waiting patiently on the ones that haven't sprouted. Haven't worked on my novel since the Spring bug bit me, my mind has been too occupied with the gardening. By the end of Summer, I'll be worn out from gardening and back to my novel.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-20-2009, 01:54 AM
I hear ya, Tepelus. In the Spring, I'm all hot to get outside and work in the dirt, but it doesn't take long to wear me out. Thank goodness Ol' Boy enjoys gardening and doesn't mind taking direction. :)

As promised, shots of the tomato temple and the Topsy-Turvy.

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/100_20262.jpg

Here's a close-up of the tomato on the far right - look closely, peeking out of the Wall-O-Water, blooms.

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/100_20252.jpg

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/100_20232.jpg

We have terrible spider mites in Oklahoma. Here's a tip from the folks at Horn Feed and Seed: don't wait to spray. Start now. Drench tops and undersides - especially the undersides - of all new growth. That's where they get started - and if you know spider mites like I know spider mites - once they're started, there's no stopping them.

Tepelus
04-20-2009, 04:57 AM
I wish mine enjoyed gardening, he acts like he's allergic to it, that helping me spread compost or rake twigs from the yard will kill him. He mows the lawn and helps with leaf clean-up in the fall...at least I have that much!

I ordered a few new daylilies today. I told myself I wasn't going to, but I couldn't resist. I am hooked on these plants. Here are some pictures I found on the internet of the ones I'm getting. I added the names to the pictures so you'll know what they are. These are not my photos.


http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/BarnOwl.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/DragonsCircle.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/DragonDreams.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/KarenMyLove.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/RobesForTheQueen.jpg

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-20-2009, 07:57 PM
Those are GORGEOUS! I have the plain yellow ones, and love them, but.... oooooo! These are so pretty.

Please don't get me hooked on another plant... :D

I have a couple patches of Naked Ladies that are very pretty, too. They come up in the spring for just foliage; then, in the hottest part of summer, a long stem will push up through the earth with a circle of pale pink lilies. No leaves, just stem and flower. These aren't mine, but they'll show you the flower - I wish I had that rock wall behind them!

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3641/3319941249_8b60c83b8b.jpg

Tepelus
04-20-2009, 10:27 PM
Our neighbors have them in their yards. I moved a group of them from a very bad spot next to the foundation of the house into my flower bed, and the darn things don't seem to like it there. I like the rock wall in that picture too. I could be a very bad enabler and give you the web address for the place I ordered the daylilies from ( http://www.mariettagardens.com/index.htm ), but that would be naughty. :)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-21-2009, 02:05 AM
GAH!tm

Bad! Bad, Tepelus! Bad!

Tepelus
04-21-2009, 03:35 AM
:D

Tepelus
04-21-2009, 03:54 AM
Here's another website for anyone interested in finding daylilies, The Lily Auction: http://www.daylily.com/cgi-bin/auction.cgi

This place is addictive. Some of the seedlings that get put on the auction get sold for a lot of money, I mean hundreds of dollars. But there are a lot of beauties for cheap, and can cause one to get carried away, like I did last year.

Fenika
04-21-2009, 07:53 PM
Gak! My chives are blooming! What do I do now? I pinched off the blooms, but should I just chop the whole plant down to an inch of growth or what?

I'm just not having any luck. But I did have fresh basil in my eggs this morning.

shakeysix
04-21-2009, 08:40 PM
i planted violas and coleus last night. i kept my gloves on until the last flat--now i'm at work trying to hide my gritty nails. i scrubbed with a nail brush but it didn't quite do the trick. reminds me of that line from GWTW--"mama always said you could tell a lady by her hands"--s6

Mr Flibble
04-22-2009, 02:19 AM
Damn slugs ate all my sweet peas! Grrr.

But my lilies are growing well, and I found something to keep the dog off my plants -- appropriately called 'Get off'. It smells quite nice and minty to me, but wave it under the dog's nose and he runs for the hills!

Siddow
04-22-2009, 03:40 AM
Ooohh...I used Get Off on my front porch when my neighbor's cat decided that my wicker furniture made a nice place to spit up his hairballs. Worked great!

So far we've been noshing on radishes. I'm surprised how much better, spicier they taste than the grocery store ones. My lettuces are growing like crazy, it'll probably be a couple of weeks before my first salad. I ended up buying tomato plants, my seedlings didn't do so well, and I'll likely end up doing the same with the peppers and some herbs.

I did best with direct sowing. It's my first year of big gardening, so I'm at the learning stage, keeping notes on what did well and how.

If we ever break out of drought, I'd like to do more flowers. We're restricted to 25 minutes, twice a week watering, with a handheld hose. Fortunately, food gardens are exempt. :)

Sophia
04-22-2009, 10:17 PM
http://i303.photobucket.com/albums/nn156/elarasophia/IMG_4655b.jpg

That's a bit of my garden where you can see the trellis that screens the bins. The clematis climber is covered in flowers, and looks really lovely. The lower half of it doesn't seem to have many leaves or buds; I'm not sure why that is, as last year the whole thing was evenly covered. Does anyone know what might have happened to it?

The little bed in front of the trellis is the annual seed bed. Most of them have come up, and we'll be thinning them out this weekend.

Edit: And just on the left of that middle bed, the large green stalks are garlic, which we planted in December. They're huge! I'm really pleased how they've come along.

Tepelus
04-23-2009, 02:09 AM
Nice! The clematis probably needs pruning. There are three types, and each type needs to be pruned differently. Google search the name of your clematis and find out what type it is (either 1,2, or 3) and then pruning clematis. I can't really tell you off hand how to prune each type, I'm not that into clematis, but this is about what I know without searching the info.

JLCwrites
04-23-2009, 07:22 AM
ACK! I leave for a few weeks and a gardening thread starts!!! I LOOOVE to garden! Just planted my fruits and veggies. This year..(to avoid the slugs) I've decided to do container gardening on my upper deck. I have one tomato (early girl), snow peas, carrots, 6 types of lettuce, radishes, herbs, blueberries, and strawberries. YUM! :D

JanDarby
04-24-2009, 12:52 AM
Gak! My chives are blooming! What do I do now?

Eat 'em. Or not.

Chives are pretty happy, no matter what you do with them. Just let them grow -- don't cut them down to the ground unless you actually want the chives to eat.

You don't have to pinch off the flowers, as you would with most herbs. Chives flower early in the spring, but the flowering doesn't harm the remaining parts of the plant, whereas for something like basil, the flowering uses up the plant's energy and decreases the output (and oil quality) of the leaves.

JD, who's also been spending a lot more time in the garden than in her manuscript (which is about a garden).

Tepelus
04-26-2009, 04:14 AM
I'm passing along this link to information about Hosta Virus X (HVX) for anyone who plans on buying hostas, especially from the big box stores, or have purchased some or have some growing in your gardens. Hostas, along with daylilies, are some of my most favorite perennials, and are some of the easiest to grow. Unfortunately, there is a virus that has spread uncontrollably and is infecting thousands of the plants we buy. I'm posting this link to spread the word to other gardeners out there, and hope you'll help spread the word along too.

http://www.inthecountrygardenandgifts.com/articles/hosta_virus_x.php

Fenika
04-26-2009, 04:57 AM
See, another reason to buy native plants :)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
04-30-2009, 04:40 PM
:snoopy: First tomato! I didn't think it had been warm enough to set any fruit, but I was wrong! :) It's a cherry tomato, but it's a tomato! w00t! Won't be long now... I can't wait to sit down with a big plate of sliced tomatos! Bacon and tomato sandwiches! Salads! :snoopy:

JanDarby
05-01-2009, 03:00 AM
I haven't even bought my tomato plants yet. Sigh. It's on my list, though, and I have a local nursery that grows the varieties I like, as long as I remember to get there before they're gone.

I usually grow paste tomatoes and grape tomatoes, rather than the big slicing ones, which don't do terribly well here in the northeast.

I've got my fingers crossed that this will be a good growing year. So far, all things yellow have done well: daffodils and forsythia have been extraordinary. All things allium (garlic and onions) seem to be thriving, but there's a bit of Mother Nature's unpredictability between now and harvest.

shakeysix
05-01-2009, 06:37 AM
it has been raining and t-storming here. i've managed to fill my new front porch with begonias, pansies, geraniums and thunbergia in red and blue pots. i've put out strawberries in jars and bought two apricots and one elberta peach tree but haven't had a chance to really get my hands dirty. maybe this weekend--s6

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-01-2009, 03:15 PM
Keep us updated on those strawberries. I bought a couple of strawberry pots three or four years ago and I've never used them for strawberries!

Tepelus
05-01-2009, 04:13 PM
Some more daylilies coming in the mail next week for me:

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/JennyKissedMe-1.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/JustATease.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/MiamiHeat.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/RaspberryWinter.jpg

And one that I picked up from a local greenhouse:

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/daylilyDragonsEye.jpg

Siddow
05-01-2009, 06:48 PM
I have blooms on the peppers and tomatoes, no fruit yet.

I have enough mustard greens to make a pot tonight, looking forward to that, and omg, my lettuces actually have a FLAVOR! I'm so excited.

Tepelus
05-01-2009, 08:10 PM
I'm waiting for my jalapeno pepper seeds to sprout. They should any day now.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-01-2009, 10:56 PM
I've got to get some of those 'Jenny Kissed Me' and plant 'em for Ol' Boy!

JanDarby
05-02-2009, 12:47 AM
I have enough mustard greens to make a pot tonight, looking forward to that, and omg, my lettuces actually have a FLAVOR! I'm so excited.

Have you ever tried growing tatsoi? I don't know the botanical details, but it's got elements of both mustards and lettuces. It's amazingly early and cute as all get-out, forming a little rosette. It's a green that can be either steamed or eaten raw. Not sure I'd eat a whole plate full raw, but mixed in with other lettuces, it's great. If you let a few plants go to seed, they'll self-seed everywhere, spring and fall, surviving light snowfalls, even.

shakeysix
05-02-2009, 12:49 AM
i'm sold. where do i find the seeds?--s6

JanDarby
05-02-2009, 06:02 PM
I got my seeds from Johnnysseeds.com, but I've seen them in other catalogues, like Territorialseed.com. SOmetimes the name is spelled a little different -- tah tsoi or the like. Once you've seen them, it's easy to spot them in a catalog. I know Johnnys on-line catalogue has a pic.

shakeysix
05-04-2009, 09:38 PM
oh--i buy from johhnysseed but tossed the catalog when i moved to my new house, in a de-clutter binge.i thought that getting rid of all mail order catalogs would surely save me $. i'm looking for sweet annie, too, and johhny's is one of the few places that offer that seed. ican order online! i'll order some tonight. 2 packs of seed will justify the handling charge. what can a few packets of garden seed cost? it's not like i have a problem. i can stop anytime... really i can.

gad--here i go again! and i don't even have a garden yet! . this weekend i did pass up a 120$ birdbath and a glazed strawberry jar that cost more than the new tires i need. it's an addiction!--s6

Tepelus
05-09-2009, 05:58 PM
You're right, shakeysix, gardening is an obsession! I have a daylily, hosta and seed growing obsession, and new this year, heuchera! Will the madness ever end? Hope not!

Anyway, my daylily orders arrived this week. I spent my entire day off yesterday widening and amending a bed to accommodate them, and to move several that are in a not so ideal spot. Today I have to clean house, and the fish tanks, ugh! I'd rather be outside laying down mulch and finishing up other projects. Guess I should get off of here and get to work. I still work even on my days off, around the house.

Sophia
05-10-2009, 01:57 PM
Yesterday we planted up our back bed with a small slate staircase, rocks, several ferns, a hosta, a couple of filipendulas (a gorgeous bright yellow-green evergreen perennial, which provides a backdrop to the bluebells at the moment) and a pulmonaria rubra for ground cover. We transferred some saxifrage from another part of the garden and put it between the slate stairs to hopefully hold in the soil. The best part was a lovely acer palmatum in a pot at the top of the staircase. Next week, we hope to buy some moss and put it all over the bed. This kind of mossy, stony bed with slate and an acer has been a kind of dream of mine for the garden for a long time.

Tepelus, I love heuchera - we have a peach flambe, the leaves of which are shades of pink, red and orange. It's flowering at the moment, and oddly, flowered in the middle of winter as well.

StephanieFox
05-10-2009, 07:14 PM
We have roto-tilled our two plots and yesterday went to the Quaker's fund-raising plant sale (It's Huge!) and bought a lot of our garden plants. We can't put in the tomatoes for another week or two (it's still a bit chilly), but we will put all the veggies in this week.

I can't wait until we're eating this stuff.

LaurieD
05-14-2009, 06:13 AM
The ditch lilies I bought on ebay last fall are blossoming - some are 2 feet tall - and the paper lanterns I also bought on ebay have come up - which surprised me. They were just dead looking sticks when I planted them last fall and they're about 3 inches tall now.

Tika
05-14-2009, 06:24 AM
[quote=IdiotsRUs;3316341]Sadly I only have a small garden at the moment.

Double sadly the new puppy ate it last year :( Who knew dogs liked eating strawberry plants?

lol, you crack me up. I know it isn't really funny. I plucked a maple tree seedling out of my front yard and lovingly cared for it for 3 long years. My dog (not a puppy) ate the top off it one day. Damn good thing I love him more than my tree!

I have 4 flower beds full of perennials and a small veggie garden. I usually fill in with some annuals for instant color every year. As far as veggies, I grow tomatoes, peppers, spinach, zucchini, summer squash and yellow beans. This year I'm trying egg plant for the first time. Not sure why, the only thing I make is egg plant parm.

Tepelus
05-14-2009, 07:22 AM
I transplanted about half of my daylily seedlings from their milk jugs into their very own, individual pots. Got labels as to what cross they are and everything. The other half will get transplanted tomorrow. I'll let them grow in their pots all summer and plant them in the ground come September. Want them to get a good root system growing before they go into the big ground! And surprisingly, my albino seedling is still alive.

Siddow
05-14-2009, 03:37 PM
I'm getting quite the reputation in the neighborhood as "the lady with the awesome garden". I love it! I will definitely build two more beds for next year.

Anybody have a suggestion for keeping birds off of my trellis? I built a bean trellis, just a basic frame with twine for the beans to climb, and the birds have taken to sitting on the top of it--so guess where they poop? lol. It's not so bad when they just poop on the leaves, but once the beans get started...well, I don't think I could wash a bird-pooped bean well enough to want to eat it, ya know?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-17-2009, 07:09 PM
For those who're curious about the Topsy Turvy tomato planter...

Here's another post of the 1st shot of it with the new tomato plants - This is from April 19:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/100_20232.jpg

And here it is, May 17, almost the same angle:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/TopsyTurveyMay172009.jpg

That's four weeks, folks. :D

And just 'cause I'm such a proud mama... here is a shot of the first cluster of fruit from the big tomato plants. You saw this one in the Wall-O'-Water earlier this year:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/FirstFruit.jpg

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-17-2009, 07:24 PM
I've fallen in love with Mandevilla, also. I'm planting two of these today among my tiny Star Clematis plants. The Mandevilla will bloom all summer in the mass of Clematis vines (about 8 feet wide and six feet tall) on my east fence... then, early in the fall, the Clematis will bloom and these big red flowers will be surrounded by clouds of tiny white blossoms.

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q172/liadano/Mandevilla.jpg

That's Ol' Boy's hairy hand in the pic. :)

dolores haze
05-17-2009, 07:32 PM
what can a few packets of garden seed cost? it's not like i have a problem. i can stop anytime... really i can.


I guess I'll just kick back in my reading chair and wait for Shakey to start begging me to take all the extra seed off her hands (again). BTW, Shakes, the poppies you sent me last year? I let them go to seed where they grew, but will they grow from seed in my area, having self-seeded? We're still getting some light frost. I probably should have collected the seed, huh?

My biggest gardening challenge right now is my "lawn." It looks like a meadow right now. The grass is almost a foot high and is smothered in wild flowers. It's so dang pretty! Mowing it is going to be a royal pain, but I guess I have to do it, what with deer ticks and the need to play soccer with the boys. Why oh why did I buy hillside property? I have to mow this mountain every weekend in the summer. It takes about six hours, which is time I'd rather spend doing other stuff.

DragonHeart
05-17-2009, 11:06 PM
I'm thinking about starting a real herb garden just for fun. I bought a lemon balm and a mint last year and not only did they survive having a tree fall on them this winter, they're thriving. As much as I want to do some chamomile it might not be a good idea for me. I'm allergic to ragweed pollen and wouldn't you know it, chamomile is in the ragweed family. I love the tea though...

My mom used to have an awesome vegetable garden before my parents divorced. We finally started a new one last year, with less than stellar results. There just isn't enough sun where the garden is, but we can't put it in the middle of the lawn either. The strawberries do fine, but we had to move the tomatoes this year. The beans might still do ok though.

I really wish my attempt at indoor veggie gardening had gone better, I'd love to have fresh vegetables year round, even if it's just beans or tomatoes.

I've also been focusing on adding in more native plants in hopes of improving the yard for wildlife. The two holly bushes are doing excellent, as is the spirea, but I still want a butterfly bush and perhaps some salvia. Too bad I can't talk my mom into getting a dogwood, they look so pretty.

shakeysix
05-18-2009, 08:29 PM
lo--don't worry about the frost. the poppies seem to thrive on it. they should come back for a year or two anyway--eventually they all turn red or pink but that takes several seasons. i have fifteen or sixteen spare packets if you ever do run out.

it has rained so much here that everything is green, even the buffalo grass! i still haven't planted much because of school but i did get three fruit trees in, this weekend.--ss ps-dragon--watch that lemon balm. it is very invasive here, in kansas. but the best thing for dry shade.

shakeysix
05-18-2009, 08:37 PM
has anyone used the acidified cotton seed bolls as a soil amendment? the soil in this new yard is clay. i've only gardened in sand and light sandy soil before. the garden centers say i need to add this--it comes under several different brand names but it all seems to be the same thing. i'm afraid that anything acidic might burn my plants. is this something worthwhile or just a fad?--s6

blacbird
05-19-2009, 10:39 AM
I'm taking tomorrow off to finish my veg garden start, and begin work on flowers. For those of you who have been doing this for weeks, remember that I live at 61 degrees north latitude, where we can have snow into May. But this year the spring has been plain glorious, like California. As opposed to last year, when we had nothing but cool drizzly ugly weather all summer, and gardening was a disaster, except for peas and broccoli and kale. I have nearly all my veggies in, many directly-seeded things already emerging, and last year I had nothing in until the end of May.

Now, if I can just keep the mooseseses out of the place, I'll be fine.

Some hints to veggie gardeners: Fireplace ashes are excellent soil additions, largely consisting of soluble potash in the form of potassium carbonate, which is great for root development. Works for flowers, too. Also, coffee grounds are good, especially for root crops of the carrot family, including hamburg parsley and parsnips.

caw

Sophia
05-19-2009, 04:02 PM
has anyone used the acidified cotton seed bolls as a soil amendment? the soil in this new yard is clay. i've only gardened in sand and light sandy soil before. the garden centers say i need to add this

I haven't heard of it, but wanted to mention that our soil is heavy clay and very alkaline due to building materials. We've got five plants that prefer acid -- two in pots, in ericaceous compost, and three (all varieties of heather) in the ground. The heathers haven't grown very much since we planted them a year ago, but they have flowered and gone to seed when they were expected to, so I'm not too worried.

I'd say consider whether the soil amendment needs to be reapplied often, and if you're happy to do that. There are a lot of very nice plants that are suited to clay and/or alkaline soils. Using these and pots for acid-loving plants might suit you more if you prefer perhaps leaving the garden to settle into itself. We dug in some grit into our beds to help with drainage, and have had no problems.

shakeysix
05-19-2009, 04:55 PM
i am so used to growing baby's breath, lavender, sage--plants that thrive in sand and grit, that i don't want to give them up. if i add acid won't that diminish my chalk loving stuff?--s6

Sophia
05-19-2009, 05:05 PM
Lavender and sage thrive in our soil. We took cuttings from the lavender last year and stuck them straight into the ground (they take 90% of the time) and the new plants are growing very well.

Looking through my plant book, I find some plants that definitely prefer a relatively low or high pH, but many that can handle pretty much anything. Perhaps you could look up the plants you're worried about and see what they can tolerate? You might be fine! :)

shakeysix
05-19-2009, 07:59 PM
mainly it is lavender and gypsophilia. love those two together. i might just add the acid to the vegetable garden--s6

blacbird
05-20-2009, 10:27 PM
Gak! My chives are blooming! What do I do now? I pinched off the blooms, but should I just chop the whole plant down to an inch of growth or what?

I'm just not having any luck. But I did have fresh basil in my eggs this morning.

First of all, you can eat the blooms; use 'em just like the chopped stems, and they're great. Then clip off most of the bloomed stalks. You may get some new growth. But chives, like all onions, have a growth-bloom-seed cycle, so I'm not sure of the latter.

caw

shakeysix
05-21-2009, 12:05 AM
boil some new potatoes and then drain them. while they are still hot douse them with a bottle of zesty italian dressing, cover them and refrigerate for 2-3 hours--overnight is better. when they are nice and cold sprinkle your chives over them and chomp down. the second best summer salad in the world--ss

DragonHeart
05-21-2009, 06:38 AM
.--ss ps-dragon--watch that lemon balm. it is very invasive here, in kansas. but the best thing for dry shade.

So far it's staying in its corner but I'll keep an eye on it. Quite frankly I'm happy to have something surviving my not quite green thumb. :p

The strawberries have started flowering so we might actually get some fruit this year. :) I don't think the beans have started coming up yet though. I think this weekend we might do some more planting, not sure yet.

Fenika
05-21-2009, 06:48 AM
Oh, Shakey, I think I'll have to try that.

Anyone got any ideas for a tiny fugly shaded clay lot in Oklahoma? The bermuda is starting to spread (last tenant had a dog) but I'd like something to semi-block the a/c unit and color up the place. Bonus if the wild birds like it just as much. Or butterflies.

My precious basil is alive but hardly growing. I keep threatening to chop a whole plant (there's two lemon basils in one pot) for scrambled eggs. Might as well before it dies off, eh?

SPMiller
05-21-2009, 01:26 PM
You said "shaded clay". That's three strikes against basil, which prefers lots of sunlight, well-drained soil, and slightly acidic soil. In contrast, you're providing shade, poorly-drained soil, and alkaline soil.

I found that basil will tolerate clays formed from marl due to the higher silt content than chalk clays (and therefore slightly better drainage), provided that you give it plenty of sunlight.

Fenika
05-21-2009, 03:42 PM
Oh, the basil is potted and the shade wasn't as bad before the trees filled in. But yeah, I'm aware that I won't be planting an actual garden here. No banana peppers for me :\

Devil Ledbetter
05-21-2009, 07:58 PM
Oh, the basil is potted and the shade wasn't as bad before the trees filled in. But yeah, I'm aware that I won't be planting an actual garden here. No banana peppers for me :\I've had excellent luck with basil for years. I grow it in large pots on my front porch, which faces west and gets good sun for about half the day. I pot them in 100% composted cow manure. They love it. I also put a marigold in each pot to keep the bug population down.

Always pinch the buds off your basil before they flower. When snipping some for the kitchen, don't pick off leaves or your basil will be skinny and stalky. Snip an entire stem down to the point where two other stems are branching out. This results in bushy, beautiful basil.

Medievalist
05-23-2009, 03:55 AM
I'm thinking about starting a real herb garden just for fun. I bought a lemon balm and a mint last year and not only did they survive having a tree fall on them this winter, they're thriving. As much as I want to do some chamomile it might not be a good idea for me. I'm allergic to ragweed pollen and wouldn't you know it, chamomile is in the ragweed family. I love the tea though...

Just pick the buds before they open all the way to use in your tea; they won't have pollen yet.

blacbird
05-23-2009, 06:51 AM
Chervil. Every herb gardener should grow chervil. It's a magnificent herb to use with fish, other seafoods, iin salads, and you'll almost never find it it grocery stores because it wilts so fast and there's no real good way of keeping it. It's a staple of a lot of French cuisine, I understand.

The plant itself looks a lot like cilantro, but the seeds are entirely different; cilantro seeds are little balls, chervil seeds are these curved needles which you can actually stick into your finger if you're not careful. It has an aroma and flavor of mild anise, but fairly intense, if that makes sense. A little goes a long way. But it's dead easy to grow in a pot, and definitely should be given a try by anyone interested in kitchen herbs.

caw

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-29-2009, 03:56 PM
We grow copious amounts of Italian flat-leaf parsley... two-fold purpose: the black swallowtail butterflies (Oklahoma's state butterfly) use it exclusively to lay their eggs. We see the coolest caterpillars, get to watch them build their cocoons, and if we're lucky, are around when they emerge as butterflies - and we get some delicious foliage to make tabouli and salsa and sauces.

Well, one of the plants bolted in an awkward spot and a few days ago Ol' Boy broke off the bolted parts and threw them to the side of the driveway so we could mow over them last night... only they were gone. I looked around and finally found them - all of them - dragged over to a nice, safe spot under the youpon holly, where every. single. leaf had been stripped off, leaving only the stems.

Mr. Bun had a nice snack. :D

I love nature.

Devil Ledbetter
05-29-2009, 04:12 PM
I have a big pot of chives. This year, they came up early. They're already over a foot tall and are now trying to flower. Do I need to snip the flowers off, or will they keep thriving even after they've flowered?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-29-2009, 04:16 PM
I always left my chives alone when they started to flower.

Leah J. Utas
05-29-2009, 04:32 PM
Excellent basil info. It doesn't do so great here (Alberta, near the Rockies) but I gamely give it a go every year. I put it in a sunny spot in the garden and tend it as best I am able. The fusarium (sp) rot sets in so it gets harvested right away and that cuts down on how much I get. Sigh.
Opal basil doesn't seem to be as susceptible to it.

Oregano, OTOH, loves it here. Thyme, too. I love my summer Greek salads with the fresh, just picked herbs.

Siddow
06-09-2009, 06:03 PM
RABBITS!

Help me. As I live in a HOA-controlled area and am lucky to have my garden survive scrutiny, I am not able to erect a rabbit fence around it. I actually like the little buggers anyway and have no problem feeding them a bit...but C'MON!

They're focused on one of the four beds--I haven't seen any damage to the others--the plants they're digging the most are the spinach and romaine. I'm worried that once those are gone, they will move on...so anyone have any interesting rabbit-repelling ideas?

Google has turned up a few:

1. Blood meal and bone meal, which I'm too worried about how that will alter the soil and affect my plants.
2. Homemade pepper spray, which would be fine if I didn't want to eat the stuff I'm spraying, lol. Peppery romaine, anyone?
3. Dryer sheets. This one makes me think, huh? Really? This one I may try. Since I have raised beds, I can actually staple the sheets to the interior of the boxes and the foliage will cover most of it so the garden will still be attractive to the HOA.

And the birds perching on my trellis and crapping on my pole beans has subsided a bit since the vines are now over the top.

For next year, I plan to plant the squash around the exterior of the boxes containing the rabbit-drawers. I have beans planted with the squash now, and those are being left alone although beans are favored by the bunnies. They must not like getting through the rough foliage, so I will use that to my favor.

Ideas needed!

Fenika
06-09-2009, 06:09 PM
Hm, have you seen the tips found on the wildlife rehab directory? The pest control link is somewhere on the main page.

I have to wonder if a little strip of electric fence (small wires, 2 or 3 low to the ground) would be enough to stop a bunny. Would at least scare the #(@% out of them for awhile.

You could always fatten them up for rabbit season (says the animal lover) It's like recycling your produce :D

Myself, I've decided to try a potted garden despite the lack of real estate and sun. I've got a rosemarry and carmen pepper. The peppers are going in a 12" pot to themselves and should do well. I just need time to repot them.

Devil Ledbetter
06-09-2009, 11:16 PM
RABBITS!

Ideas needed!
Get a dog. Or if you have a dog, give him access to your garden. With past gardens, rabbits always ate our stuff. This year we have a dog, and no rabbit damage yet.

Jack Russells make rabbits nervous.

Fenika
06-16-2009, 01:41 AM
I have sweet peppers coming along :D

And as of now they are justttt getting 6 hours of daylight. I'm gonna ask the landlord to trim a little of the tree (1 lower branch is causing 99% of the problem).

I also got a rosemarry, though more for fun.

shakeysix
06-16-2009, 02:12 AM
i had to prop up my nerw peach tree because it is loaded down with baby peaches. i think because it is raining so much and clouding up even now. i trimmed all of the smallest peaches off but didn't have the heart to take them all. hope we don't get the hail that is pounding the county next to us--s6

blacbird
06-16-2009, 02:18 AM
Ate my first big salad from the garden yesterday: three kinds of leaf lettuce, arugula, mustard, mustard spinach, mizuna, radish roots and leaves, chervil. Was fabulous. Potatoes are leafed up out of the ground, have started a bunch of seeds in flats for late summer harvest, re-potted tomatoes this morning (which are something of a prayer at 61 degrees north latitude). Moose haven't eaten anything. Yet.

caw

Fenika
06-16-2009, 02:20 AM
Oh, peaches are wonderful. Send some my way ;) Good luck with the hail. We got our share a few days ago. Luckily my plants were under the deck for safekeeping against the thunderstorms that evening.

StephanieFox
06-16-2009, 10:46 PM
This is a really good supposedly Chinese recipe for chives. Cut the buds (before they flower) and lay them flat in a pan of boiling chicken broth. Let them simmer until they start to get soft. Serve. Sounds weird, but this is really good. If you don't grow your own, you can get chive blossims in some Asian supermarkets.

StephanieFox
06-16-2009, 10:47 PM
Get a dog. Or if you have a dog, give him access to your garden. With past gardens, rabbits always ate our stuff. This year we have a dog, and no rabbit damage yet.

Jack Russells make rabbits nervous.

Rabbits aren't afraid of my dog. They don't run away. They walk away.

blacbird
06-17-2009, 12:29 AM
I haven't tried this myself, but I've read that rabbits detest the scent of marigolds, so you might consider lining your veggie plot with them. I know they don't bother my flowerbeds, in which I have marigolds. But mostly I plant flowers the moose won't eat (dianthus, gazanias, columbines, for instance), so I'd guess the rabbits won't eat those, either.

caw

Amarie
06-17-2009, 02:29 AM
WE finally gave up trying to convince the rabbits, deer and birds to go elsewhere and just covered up everything we didn't want them to eat with netting attached to poles. It's a pain to pick anything, but I got tired of seeing the robin brigade snarfing all our strawberries. Last year one of robins got so fat I don't know how he flew. We are going to have a huge crop of raspberries this year as long as none of the creatures learn to use scissors to cut thru the nets.

SPMiller
06-19-2009, 09:35 PM
I've done very little this year, but the basil returned. I thought it was an annual, so consider me surprised.

The fig tree's finally starting to grow.

Fenika
06-19-2009, 10:15 PM
*grabs the paint*

:)

It's so dry here I'm watering every day. I may have neglected my basil seeds to the point of death--oops. Will see if they come up.

Sophia
06-19-2009, 11:50 PM
RABBITS!

Help me. As I live in a HOA-controlled area and am lucky to have my garden survive scrutiny, I am not able to erect a rabbit fence around it. I actually like the little buggers anyway and have no problem feeding them a bit...but C'MON!

They're focused on one of the four beds--I haven't seen any damage to the others--the plants they're digging the most are the spinach and romaine. I'm worried that once those are gone, they will move on...so anyone have any interesting rabbit-repelling ideas?

For next year, I plan to plant the squash around the exterior of the boxes containing the rabbit-drawers. I have beans planted with the squash now, and those are being left alone although beans are favored by the bunnies. They must not like getting through the rough foliage, so I will use that to my favor.


What Plant Where (http://www.amazon.co.uk/What-Plant-Where-Creative-Choosing/dp/0751302104/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245440368&sr=8-1) by Roy Lancaster has a couple of lists of rabbit-proof shrubs and perennials. There are several gorgeous plants suggested, as well as one herb, rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis).

Edging box (buxus sempervirens 'Suffruticosa') is suggested as a low, evergreen plant suitable for edging beds and borders, and might work well around your boxes. Other small plants (from 25 cm to 45 cm high) you could use this way are bloody cranesbill (geranium sanguineum), catmint (nepeta x faassenii) and lenten rose (helleborus orientalis). I can give you some more if you're interested, or have a particular height in mind (the lists are a bit long to give in full). Given the burrowing abilities of rabbits, I'm not sure they wouldn't just bypass the plants. But you'll get some nice plants out of it. :)

Mr Flibble
06-20-2009, 12:25 AM
*Twilight zone music*

The last ad I got before clicking in here was for rabbit resistant plants.

It's there at the top of the page. Look! It's following me! ARRRRRRRGH!

Fenika
06-20-2009, 12:25 AM
The ads are spying on us, oh noes!

Siddow
06-20-2009, 12:53 AM
lol. I've got marigolds growing in all the boxes, and the one being noshed the most has tons of them, because it's where the carrots were, and they discourage nematodes.

My broccoli is being noshed, too, but that's got to be deer, or vewy vewy large wabbit.

I'm being inundated with beans and squash. The tomatoes are starting to ripen. I had to buy lettuce today. :(

I ended up buying some rabbit fencing, planning to install it to the inside of the one box. It's too hot right now. HOA be dammed, I want homegrown lettuce and spinach!

blacbird
06-23-2009, 09:07 AM
Another tactic I've tried, both for rabbits and moose, is sprinkling cayenne or other hot pepper powder on the key plants. It seems to have worked, and has kept the rhinoceroses and elephants away as well.

caw

JLCwrites
06-25-2009, 02:23 AM
My tomato plant has yellow leaves around the bottom of it. I think it is getting too much water, but it is still raining here and if I pull it under the eaves (its in a pot) then it won't get the measly sunlight from our overcast June days. *sigh* Growing tomatoes in the Northwest isn't easy. Last year I planted tomatoes in the ground, and the rains that started in September cause my tomatoes to explode.

blacbird
06-25-2009, 02:25 AM
Last year I planted tomatoes in the ground, and the rains that started in September cause my tomatoes to explode.

Last year the snows that started in September caused my tomatoes to resemble cannonballs.

caw

Stlight
07-09-2009, 06:50 AM
EEEEK! I don't even want to think of snows in September. Though my indoor plants might like turning the heat on early. We'll probably still be using the a/c then. Speaking of which can anyone help on this:

Avocado question

I have five avocado plants in large pots that sit by the large windows on the east side of the house. This is the only place where they can get sun. I’ve put the air direction covers on the a/c vents near them to blow away from them.

Since they get dry at different times, I check the dirt in each pot before deciding to water or not. I don’t really understand this as the pots are almost the same size. I’ve already put wood supports in each pot with light ties.

Of the five one has few leaves, and the tips of the leaves have turned brown. This particular plant has never seemed as strong as the others. It is about a year old, three of the others are two, and one is about five months. The others appear to be fine.

Any thoughts? Help?
Thanks.

blacbird
07-09-2009, 08:56 AM
Tonight's meal, straight from the garden: A single kohlrabi the size of a softball, sliced into sticks.

Eaten.

Was magnificent. Best kohlrabi I've ever grown. Those of you unfamiliar with kohlrabis need to give them a go. Wonderful veg, raw or cooked.

caw

Siddow
07-09-2009, 05:34 PM
Never eaten kohlrabi. I'll have to give it a try. My broccoli didn't do well, so I ended up pulling it all and planting turnip greens in its place. I think I'll also add eggplant next year, and other self-sowing annuals. My marigolds went ka-BLOOM, I ended up digging up a dozen or so and moving them to various parts of the yard. Each plant was about a foot or more wide, and in an 8-ft box, well, it got a little crowded. :D

Rabbit fence is doing well. I just stapled one around the one box, and problem solved, no complaints from the HOA. All potential rabbit food goes in that one box.

I pulled a yellow squash yesterday the size of my forearm.

Saint Fool
07-10-2009, 04:54 AM
Picked my first yellow squash of the season, sliced it, cooked it, butter, salt, pepper. Nom-nom-nom.

shakeysix
07-14-2009, 05:31 PM
my cat ate my first tomato!!! swear to god!!!! i picked a pretty little jet star yesterday evening and put it in my kitchen window. about two a.m. i got up to get a drink of water. there was this gooey stuff all over the faucet and counter. i flipped on the light and to my everlasting horror i saw the murdered corpse of my firstborn. puncture wounds, slashes, bruising and excessive blood loss--the gore will stay with me forever.

i picked the son of a bitch off my bed where he was sleeping and threw him into the night! i still haven't let him in! --s6

shakeysix
07-14-2009, 06:30 PM
ps-- of course i sliced poor baby up and ate him on the spot, i'm not about to let a little catspit stand between me and the first tomato of the year--s6

Tepelus
07-23-2009, 05:48 AM
I haven't been on this site in a few months, since it's turned summer, I've been busy with work, home and my garden. I haven't even looked at my WIP since, oh, I think May? Early May? Anyway, I want to share with you all some pictures of my daylilies from this year. Here's the link to my photobucket album with my pictures, and I have to warn you, there are a lot of pictures!

http://s193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Daylilies%202009/

shakeysix
07-23-2009, 06:43 AM
quite a show! how many beds do you have? i didn't put any out because my garden is so new but i wrote down the names of some of yours. lucky shamrock and asian emissary caught my eye. are they creamy white or pale yellow?--s6

Keyboard Hound
07-23-2009, 07:17 AM
I haven't been on this site in a few months, since it's turned summer, I've been busy with work, home and my garden. I haven't even looked at my WIP since, oh, I think May? Early May? Anyway, I want to share with you all some pictures of my daylilies from this year. Here's the link to my photobucket album with my pictures, and I have to warn you, there are a lot of pictures!

http://s193.photobucket.com/albums/z16/tepelus_album/Daylilies%202009/


Beautiful!! I looked at all of them. I just found the gardening thread.

Tepelus
07-24-2009, 02:31 AM
Thanks! I think both Asian Emissary and Lucky Shamrock started looking like a pale cream yellow on the first blooms, but became more of a cream white with subsequent blooms. A lot of my whites start out that way too, and become more white as they continue to bloom, but never a pure white. I guess if they got more sun, as all of my daylilies are in light, partial shade, the sun's rays would bleach the white ones out more and they would appear more white at the end of the day.

threedogpeople
08-05-2009, 09:02 AM
Picked my first yellow squash of the season, sliced it, cooked it, butter, salt, pepper. Nom-nom-nom.

Try it with lemon pepper & butter.....WOW!

threedogpeople
08-05-2009, 09:07 AM
My Liberty apple tree is loaded (LOADED) with baby apples. It has been so, record breaking, hot here that I'm having to water the tree though. I got to eat 5 or 6 cherries this year, so did my husband. Seems like we feed the birds more than we feed ourselves but so what. We got lots and lots of bird nests and babies this year.

I have basil, rosemary and tomatoes planted. Already enjoying the basil and rosemary. Tomatoes are very, very slow going up here. But I container planted them so I can move them to more sheltered locations as the fall approaches (inside even if i need to). They are Sweet 1000 so once they set fruit it should come fast and furious.

The wild blackberries are ALL over the place. I've already bought jars, pectin & sugar getting ready for my first blackberry jam session. Already have red currant/raspberry in the pantry (only got 4.5 jars since red currants are sooooo hard to find).

Fenika
08-09-2009, 06:27 PM
Wow, you folks have a lot of wonderful gardens going.

Anyone want a carmen pepper plant? My poor thing is dying from lack of sun at this stupid apartment :(

Nivarion
08-11-2009, 08:28 AM
I've got five squash plants in my garden. I'm getting at least one squash a day that are big enough to use as a side for the whole family. Since there are some days when I get three or even four of them.

My tomatoes are all still small and green, the peas have made nothing, the basil is as tall as my knee. I have watermelons the size of my head, and dozens of small baby ones. The corn is covered. My garden is doing good.

I saw someone up a ways was having rabbit problems. After my first couple of rabbit harvests they stopped coming. :( They were good with a bit of squash too.

Anyways, I'm about to put some beets in. These things love August here.

shakeysix
08-11-2009, 05:58 PM
the moon and stars watermelons are the big success. they are everywhere. the last time i grew watermelons i didn't have an adjacent lawn. i didn't plan well, so there are watermelon vines snaking across my backyard. the lawn mower guy just mows around them, so the melons are pretty much hidden in tall grass while the rest of the yard is short. kind of crazy looking but i'm happy. my big problem with the melons is when to pick them. they say when the vine begins to shrivel at the place where it is attached to the melon. i've done it that way and always picked them too green. anyone know another way to tell?--s6

DragonHeart
09-14-2009, 07:25 PM
Well, our garden hasn't done very well this season. :( The summer was just too wet and rainy. What the slugs didn't eat the lack of sunlight finished off. Pretty much only the tomatoes, strawberries and my two herbs survived. Said slugs also ate the strawberries, so we don't get any this year. /cries

At least the tomatoes made it through, we're just waiting for them to ripen.

I guess we'll just have to try again next year.

shakeysix
09-14-2009, 08:34 PM
wet and cool here. we only had a couple of weeks in the 100+ zone. when i sliced into my first watermelon it almost burst open by itself. sign of a wet summer they say. the cool weather has my snapdragons re-blooming. and lots of blue sage. bad for the sunflowers though. they've pretty much given up the ghost--s6

~*Kate*~
09-14-2009, 08:43 PM
Wet and cool here, too. We still have peppers, okra and tomatoes like crazy. We put pumpkins in a few weeks ago and the vines are going crazy, so fingers crossed that we have a good harvest at the end of October. There are some random pics on the blog in my sig.