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DirtySyko
05-27-2005, 05:21 AM
I haven't come across any threads talking about what we're currently reading, so I thought I would put one together. So if you're reading something right now, or just got done reading something, or if you want to RECOMMEND something to read, post here and share your thoughts.

Right now I'm reading "The Accidental Tourist" by Anne Tyler.

From what I've read so far it's very interesting and it does a good job of keeping the reader entertained as well. The character development is great. You really get an overall understanding of the characters, and the book definitely focus' on the characters while the plot builds around them. For the most part I also have an understanding of certain aspects these characters have, because I share the same traits, which is another thing that keeps me interested in the book. Another thing I like is how the writer actually writes the book. She jumps around a lot, making it seem very frantic, nervous, and compulsive, which is just how the main character acts. She doesn't jump around to the point where you don't understand what's going on though, just enough to show how the character thinks. His mind racing a million miles a second.

Another thing about this book is the messages it's trying to portray, or at least what I think it's trying to portray. It's hard to say what the author is really saying, because when we read or watch movies we gather what WE want from it, even if the creator had a totally different intention... But so far the message I'm seeing is how the author feels about marriage. It's showing that no matter how much love you have for someone, you will inevitably become tired of the other person. It gets really involved with the character's problems, and what they dislike about each other, and how over time it really affects their marriage. So it really makes me think that the author is trying to say "You may love someone with all your heart, but sometimes you just get bored of the same old thing."

I could be completely wrong, but hey, I'm only halfway through the book ;)

triceretops
05-27-2005, 07:54 AM
Dirty, I'm reading several books while I'm coming to the end of my novel. The Stand, because I've heard so much about it. Azimov's, the God's Themselves (because it is set 100 yrs in the future like mine). I'm looking for Farenheit 451

Triceratops

sandymae2000
05-27-2005, 08:03 AM
Hi!
I just finished "Never Let Me Go" by Kuzao Ishiguro, the Booker-prize winning author of "Remains of The Day." It's brilliant. Kind of reminiscent of Ira Levin or even Ray Bradbury. He starts out in the middle of the story and you gradually get clues as to the theme of the book. Not a word used that wasn't necessary. I highly recommend it.

Sandy

sgtsdaughter
05-27-2005, 08:41 AM
The Informers, Brett Easton Ellis
and a few gender theory books . . . first one is highly interesting.

poetinahat
05-27-2005, 09:27 AM
I recently read Soul Mountain, by Gao Xingjian. It's a tome, and it won its author won the Nobel Prize for literature.

I would love to say I found it an insightful, thought-provoking look into the author's world and into the Chinese zeitgeist....

But I can't.

I found it to be hundreds of pages of wandering atmosphere. I wouldn't call it self-indulgent, but I didn't feel enriched by having read it.

On the brighter side, I loved Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco (author of The Name of the Rose). It's a slog in places, but well worth it.

Great idea for a thread!

E.G. Gammon
05-27-2005, 09:29 AM
Harry Potter. I don't think I need to tell you what it's about. I got sucked into Harry Potter mania right when the first movie came out. Now, I'm trying to read the first 5 books in time for the release of Book 6 in July. It could also be counted as research, since I am writing a novel series, too and I can learn a lot about one if I'm reading one - especially a successful one (is "successful" strong enough a word?).

mmm... pancakes
05-27-2005, 01:32 PM
On my bedside table:

Everything I know about writing - John Marsden (not as good as I expected)
The Pocket Muse - Monica Wood (bloody fantastic!)
Return to China - James Bertram (an oldie and hard to get into)
and
Lonely Planet China - I'm trying to decide where to go for a holiday...

I don't know how likely it is for any non-New Zealander, but if you can find a Joe Bennett book (published by Hazard Press) they are well worth it. My fav author. Similar in many ways to Bill Bryson's columns, only not travel-related and shorter.

William Haskins
05-27-2005, 05:46 PM
currently reading this thread.

next: email!

maestrowork
05-27-2005, 05:56 PM
Insightful, Will.

Same here.

But, currently on my night stand: The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Haven't finished it yet, but a powerful read.

William Haskins
05-27-2005, 05:58 PM
i try not to read while i'm heavily into a writing project, so i'm on sort of a reading haitus. however, i still engage in lame, sophomoric humor.

i apologize for being flippant.

Sarita
05-27-2005, 05:59 PM
Fiction wise, just finished reading A Picture of Dorian Gray. On to: The Good Women of China.

rhymegirl
05-27-2005, 06:04 PM
i try not to read while i'm heavily into a writing project, so i'm on sort of a reading haitus.

I'm with you on this one, William.

maestrowork
05-27-2005, 06:07 PM
Interesting, Will. I tend to do that, too. But when I have downtime (meaning blockage) I do like to pick up a good book -- usually I find good writing inspires me to write, and write better. But yes, when I'm heavy in BIC mode, I don't like to read.

Kevin Yarbrough
05-27-2005, 06:18 PM
Man, the people here are reading some serious books. Me, on the other hand, am reading Brimstone by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Good book, great plot twists. Is the devil is killing all these people? Why? Preston-Child are excellent writers. They can weave a story better than grandma can weave a throw rug and this is turning out to be one of their best.

Just finished Sandstorm by James Rollins. Great book, one of the best I have read. Action, plot twists, great characters.

Am going to read The Taking by Dean Koontz next. It seems that Koontz is getting better with each book and that surprises me. He is quickly becoming one of my fav authors.

Poet, I have Foucault's Pendulum but haven't read it yet. It seems interesting though.

Azure Skye
05-27-2005, 06:48 PM
I'm currently reading:

Third Girl -- Agatha Christie
A Series of Unfortunate Events #1 -- Lemony Snicket

And some A+ Certification books but those aren't fun.:cry:

mommie4a
05-27-2005, 07:17 PM
i apologize for being flippant.

Speaking for myself, no need to apologize - we know that about you and it always makes me smile.

On my bedside:

Prayer for Owen Meaney
Old copies of The Jerusalem Report
Anne Sexton Love Poems
Hugh Prather Notes on Love and Courage
Anne Morrow Lindbergh Gifts from the Sea
Jane Austen Persuasion
Five different books on Judaism
A cup of water
A coaster for my water
A lamp

Sarita
05-27-2005, 07:25 PM
On my bedside:Anne Morrow Lindbergh Gifts from the Sea
Jane Austen Persuasion
A lamp

How bizarre! These three items are on my nightstand too. Along with Love Poems of Lord Byron, Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter), Anthology of Irish Poetry, Roget's French Dictionary, The Complete Works of Chaucer, 2 Journals, a Sketchbook, 5 pairs of earrings, 2 hair ties, a bottle of Pellegrino and my hateful alarm clock.

mommie4a
05-27-2005, 07:26 PM
How bizarre! These three items are on my nightstand too. Along with Love Poems of Lord Byron, Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter), Anthology of Irish Poetry, Roget's French Dictionary, The Complete Works of Chaucer, 2 Journals, a Sketchbook, 5 pairs of earrings, 2 hair ties, a bottle of Pellegrino and my hateful alarm clock.

Separated at birth - a long, multigenerational birth?

maestrowork
05-27-2005, 07:29 PM
Speaking for myself, no need to apologize - we know that about you and it always makes me smile.

On my bedside:

A cup of water
A coaster for my water
A lamp

Inside my nighttable drawer: Penthouse VI, underneath a bunch of highlighters and pads of paper

How bizarre. These are the same items I have!

I also have a few other books, but I won't tell you their titles...

mommie4a
05-27-2005, 07:32 PM
Repeat after me:

I will not hijack this thread.
I will not hijack this thread.
I will not hijack this thread.

BlueTexas
05-27-2005, 08:29 PM
Speaking for myself, no need to apologize - we know that about you and it always makes me smile.

On my bedside:

Prayer for Owen Meaney


How are you liking this book? It seemed like it took me forever to read it, but once I got into the second half, the pacing seemed to really pick up. I loved it.
Currently, I'm reading:

Eats, Shoots and Leaves
The Gunslinger
A Collection of Edwardian Ghost Stories

Lauri B
05-27-2005, 08:53 PM
You are all way too intellectual for me.
On my bedside table (covered in dust):
Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball
Reading Lolita in Tehran
Confessions of a Teenage Sleuth
Where's Waldo, Hollywood Edition
hair ties
lamp
water glass
dog rabies tag
kids' underwear
someone's toothbrush (no one will claim it)
ticket stub from Anglieque Kidjo concert
piece of paper for those moments when I have an amazingly inspired idea come to me in a dream (hasn't happened yet, but I do have a mysterious phone number written on it in someone else's handwriting)

allion
05-27-2005, 09:56 PM
Currently reading:

Portrait of a Killer - Jack the Ripper Case Closed by Patricia Cornwell
Hitler 1936-1945 - Nemesis by Ian Kershaw
Complete Idiot's Guide to Technical Writing

Karen

mdin
05-27-2005, 09:58 PM
You people have some cluttered bedside tables.

I'm currently wading through The Amber Spyglass, after putting off reading it for some time. Next up is John Ling's Fourteen Bullets.

BradyH1861
05-27-2005, 10:54 PM
Currently reading:

Paradise Alley by Kevin Baker for the second time (I highly recommend it)
The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris
Rudyard Kipling: Complete Verse (I read little from this each night)

Brady H.

Liam Jackson
05-27-2005, 10:58 PM
Will, "flippant" is first among your many sterling qualities.

Maryn
05-27-2005, 11:11 PM
I'm so jealous of people with an actual nightstand. Somehow our make-do end tables have become permanent.

Mine holds a dusty telephone (which picks up radio, so is the last phone you choose), the TV remote (got to end the evening with "The Daily Show"!), a 3-inch plastic wombat one of the kids left behind years ago, A Prayer for Owen Meany--thanks for the heads-up that it's going to get better--and Midnight In the Garden of Good and Evil, which I seem to have abandoned half-way through, and the clock radio with the extra bar in its digital display, so I can get up at 6:80 most mornings.

Maryn

TemlynWriting
05-27-2005, 11:22 PM
Scattered about the house (not just on my nightstand):

The Writing Life by Annie Dillard

Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery (My husband bought the series for me a few years ago for my birthday, and I'm finally reading it!)

I'd Rather Be Writing by Marcia Golub

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (I want to get a picture in my mind of Dahl's original story, since he hated the first film.)

I have a few others, but can't think of them off the top of my head.

Celeste
05-28-2005, 12:15 AM
I usually read at night. There's a few different books I've been reading. What I read all depends on what type of mood I'm in...

The books are...

The Breakdown Lane by Jacquelyn Mitchard
(Very good story of a woman who falls off track of a comfortable life and learns to rise again.)

Wifey by Judy Blume
(About a very nice housewife with a very dirty mind. I recommend it, ladies!) ;)

The Bastard on the Couch: 27 men try really hard to explain their feelings about Love, Loss, Fatherhood and Freedom by Daniel Jones.
(Written for men, but still quite interesting. Lol...)

The Best Erotica 2005, short stories edited by Susie Bright.

Angels Dance and Angels Die: The Tragic Romance of Pamela and Jim Morrison by Patricia Butler.

ChunkyC
05-28-2005, 12:35 AM
Just finished The Fourth Hand by John Irving. Good book, but he's repeating himself a bit. In spots I found it reminiscent of The World According to Garp.

Just started P is for Peril by Sue Grafton. I read A is for Alibi a while back (good fun), but none of the ones in between. This should be a good indication of how a book in a series can stand on its own. I hope.

I'm halfway through The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling, and I'm finding it a bit of a slog. I think I started it back in January, which is really bad since I finish a novel in a week or two if I like it a lot. It's not throw-against-wall bad, but it's just not getting me excited.

arrowqueen
05-28-2005, 02:58 AM
Just finished Donna Tart's 'The Little Friend.' and 'Run for Home' by Sheila Quigley. (She started work at 15 as a presser in a tailoring factory and this is her first novel.)

About to start either 'Nip'n'tuck' by Kathy Lette or an autobiography of Robert Service. (Depends what state my brain's in tomorrow.)

Cassie88
05-28-2005, 06:48 AM
How was Donna Tart's book? I loved her first one...can't remember title... Is her second book as good as her first??

Kudra
05-28-2005, 10:05 AM
I'm reading The Other Side of the Story by Marian Keyes and Six Figure Freelancing by Kelly James-Enger. Next on my list is Chapatti or Chips by Nisha Minhas.

rhymegirl
05-28-2005, 06:40 PM
Now I feel guilty that I'm not reading anything. When do you guys have time to read?

E.G. Gammon
05-28-2005, 07:38 PM
Now I feel guilty that I'm not reading anything. When do you guys have time to read?

I RARELY have time to read. I'm only reading the first 5 Harry Potter books so I can catch up by the time the 6th comes out. I'm not a BIG reader. Writing is what I enjoy the most.

rhymegirl
05-28-2005, 07:58 PM
I RARELY have time to read. I'm only reading the first 5 Harry Potter books so I can catch up by the time the 6th comes out. I'm not a BIG reader. Writing is what I enjoy the most.

My daughter wants me to read the 4th and 5th Harry Potter books. But they're so LONG! I've only made it through about half of the 4th one. I'm a slow reader. I would rather write, too.

ChunkyC
05-28-2005, 08:44 PM
Now I feel guilty that I'm not reading anything. When do you guys have time to read?
That's how bathrooms get the nickname "the library", if I know I'm gonna be more than thirty seconds, I bring along a book. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

I do most of my reading when I go to bed. I try to read at least one chapter before I zonk out for the night. If the book is really good, I'm up half the night.

rhymegirl
05-28-2005, 09:01 PM
See that's what I mean, CC. If I start reading something and it's really good, I can't stop reading it. But with all of the things I have to juggle(kids, housework, writing, family responsibilities), I can't devote a whole lot of time to reading. Not novels anyway. I can read short stuff such as magazine articles, the Sunday paper(even that, only some of it), and some online articles.

E.G. Gammon
05-28-2005, 09:07 PM
That's how bathrooms get the nickname "the library", if I know I'm gonna be more than thirty seconds, I bring along a book. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

I do most of my reading when I go to bed. I try to read at least one chapter before I zonk out for the night. If the book is really good, I'm up half the night.

Now, I know this will come out weird no matter how I say it, but I do a lot of writing while "occupied" in the bathroom. I mean you're just "sitting," or standing in the shower - YOUR MIND WANDERS. I couldn't tell you how many times I almost broke my neck running from the shower - still wet, towel wrapped loosely around my waist, practically naked - down the steps to my office, just to write down what I was thinking about so I wouldn't forget.

E.G. Gammon
05-28-2005, 09:10 PM
My daughter wants me to read the 4th and 5th Harry Potter books. But they're so LONG! I've only made it through about half of the 4th one. I'm a slow reader. I would rather write, too.

I know what you mean about them being so long. But, if the book is good, I don't really notice the length. I am jealous of those Harry Potter fans who discovered the books when they first came out. By now, they have probably read them twice and I'll barely finish the first 5 ONCE, before the 6th one is released...

gogoshire
05-28-2005, 09:41 PM
Right now I'm primarily reading Mark Helprin's A Winter's Tale, and I'm loving it.

Also on my nightstand?
lava lamp
alarm clock
Umberto Eco's Baudolino - I love Eco, but I'm having a hard time getting into this one.
Three notebooks and various pens and pencils and highlighters
Gore Vidal's Lincoln (see above)
Janet Frame's Carpathians
Bhagavad-Gita
Some local poetry chapbooks
Love and Ideology in the Afternoon: Soap Opera, Women and Television Genre
Natalie Goldberg's Wild Mind
German flash cards
Public speaking textbook that I MUST finish before classes begin this week:mad:
Victoria's Secret catalog (cotton panties on sale for $2.99, ladies!)
Angels in America DVD case. Watched 2nd half last night. Wow. What a play.

Celeste
05-29-2005, 12:29 AM
Victoria's Secret catalog (cotton panties on sale for $2.99, ladies!)


I have that 'book' too! It's the best, isn't it?! Lol...;)

arrowqueen
05-29-2005, 01:16 AM
It was very good, Cassie. It's the first time I've read any of hers.

(Oh, and I opted for 'Nip'n'Tuck'. It's a hoot.)

DirtySyko
05-29-2005, 01:19 AM
I have time to read because I'm 19, I don't have kids and at this point I don't even want a girlfriend (been single for 2 months, and I'm loving it. I haven't been single this long, I usually try to be in relationships.), and I'm also not in school at the moment. So I read, write, and draw.

When I'm not doing those things I usually just lounge around, or I use these substances I've deemed "creativity enhancers."

Cassie88
05-29-2005, 04:53 AM
I would rather write, too.

Kate, I can totally relate. No rhyme intended. A few months ago, I realized I hadn't read anything in ages and it bothered me as writers need to read. Why is everything rhyming? Geez. So, I try to get in a few pages at night. I recently PM'd you about That Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. It's in paperback and it's a fast read. I know you'd like it. Another book that I loved is Anne Lamott's Traveling Mercies..also in paperback and also a fast read. She just released a follow-up, Plan B...... read that in two nights.
I think I've mentioned Lamott's books in the memoir thread in the Get With the Genre Forum. Traveling Mercies is one of my favorite books! I've probably bought 7 copies, 2 of which were hardcover - all lent out and never returned.
I'm without a copy as we speak. OY.
As for the Harry Potter books, well, I read about 3/4 of the first one, and put it down. Just didn't do it for me.

Part I of Empire Falls is on HBO at 9. There's a book I meant to read. Richard Russo won the 2002 Pulitzer for fiction. He's written the teleplay.
In the mood for a good movie. Hope it delivers.

arrowqueen
05-30-2005, 02:08 AM
Finished 'Nip'n'Tuck'. Did I start reading the biography of Robert Service? Did I b*ggery. Now halfway through Norah Robert's 'Reunion in Death' instead.

Gehanna
05-30-2005, 04:21 AM
Tonight, I will finish reading The Grief Recovery Handbook: The Action Program For Moving Beyond Death, Divorce, And Other Losses by John W. James & Russell Friedman.

Tomorrow I will begin reading Banishing Night Terrors and Nightmares: A Breakthrough Program To Heal The Traumas That Shatter Peaceful Sleep by Christopher Raoul Carranza & Jane Rogers Dill, Ph.D., L.M.F.T., D.A.P.A.
Additionally, I will begin reading The First Idea: How Symbols, Language, And Intelligence Evolved From Our Primate Ancestors To Modern Humans by Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D. & Stuart G. Shanker, D. PHIL.

Azure Skye
05-30-2005, 04:32 AM
Tomorrow I will begin reading Banishing Night Terrors and Nightmares: A Breakthrough Program To Heal The Traumas That Shatter Peaceful Sleep by Christopher Raoul Carranza & Jane Rogers Dill, Ph.D., L.M.F.T., D.A.P.A.


Are you reading this because you have night terrors or for research? I suffer from them and I would love to know a little more about the book.

Gehanna
05-30-2005, 05:37 AM
I read this kind of material to keep myself educated, for research and in some cases for self help purposes. I will be happy to let you know about the book. In fact, I will concentrate on reading it so that I can get back to you with info. about it asap.

Sincerely,
Gehanna

aboyd
05-30-2005, 06:53 AM
I'm reading the Chronicles of Narnia to my daughter, and mostly hating it now. I mean, I love the time with my kid. But the books are exasperating.

I've heard people say that they are very childlike, and have nothing to offer adults. I don't see that. I can see plenty of adult themes and grown-up situations. But I'm also starting to grow weary of the possibly racist tone of some of the books. The villians are always dark-skinned with accents. The Last Unicorn in particular is hard to read to my kid -- I find myself changing the text on the fly just to avoid exposing her to an uptight white bread world. I'm sure she'll get enough of that without me contributing to it.

Also reading book 4 in the Hitchhiker's trilogy. They get worse as I go on. The first one was hilarious.

Also trying to read "A Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin. But I just can't slog through the first 5 or 10 chapters (however much is needed to get the backstory going), so I've never been able to get hooked. I'm told that this is the best fantasy writing since LotR, but I just can't see it yet.

-Tony