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Susan Breen
02-14-2009, 11:18 PM
death, according to a review I just read in The New York Times. Do you think that's true?

Sirion
02-14-2009, 11:29 PM
death, according to a review I just read in The New York Times. Do you think that's true?

Well, death is one thing that all people have in common. The other is taxes, but to be honest I could never get past the first chapter of those books. Go figure.

This is only for the 21st century though? Death has always been pronounced in writing since the beginning of storytelling. I don't expect it to change.

So yes, I agree.

Puma
02-14-2009, 11:52 PM
Looking at the current economic situations, I can see some interest in light comedy/humor, semi-moralistic survival stories, human heroes and ultra good guys who help out in a pinch - aka the types of stories that help people get through hard times. But of course, hopefully these hard times won't continue through the entire century. Puma

brainstorm77
02-14-2009, 11:54 PM
Possibly.. I find it interesting.

Shady Lane
02-14-2009, 11:57 PM
Death is not a theme.

Themes have verbs.

willietheshakes
02-14-2009, 11:59 PM
The world goes with the boomers, these days. And as they face their own age and mortality... Yeah, it seems like a good possibility to me.

soapdish
02-15-2009, 12:01 AM
I wonder if more specifically suicide might be a popular topic. I have heard the rate is going up with the economic crisis. Also I suspect there will be more tales of what people do when their backs are against the wall--"desperate times call for desperate measures" sort of thing.

gothicangel
02-15-2009, 12:01 AM
Probably revenge built around plots about terrorism or religious zeal.

AnonymousWriter
02-15-2009, 12:17 AM
Death is always going to happen. So I don't see why it wouldn't be a possibility...

bsolah
02-15-2009, 08:06 AM
Yeah, I don't see how this theme is unique to this century.

Fullback
02-15-2009, 10:43 AM
Maybe the theme was the death of writers using italics for newspaper names in the 21st century?

Virector
02-15-2009, 02:45 PM
I'm planning a book that deals entirely with death. I told some friends of mine my perception of death and my theories about ghosts and they were so fascinated by my wacky ideas that they pressured me into writing a book about it. If that's what's been predicted as a major theme for the 21st century, then I'll be glad to make a contribution. :D

bsolah
02-15-2009, 03:14 PM
death, according to a review I just read in The New York Times. Do you think that's true?

Do you have a link to this? Do you mean the essay?

Saskatoonistan
02-15-2009, 03:16 PM
Boomers facing their mortality will definitely be a theme. I suspect the global economic meltdown of armageddony proportions will have a lot to do with things - it's early days still, I keep hearing the word "depression" on the lips of politicians and press alike.

bsolah
02-15-2009, 03:18 PM
Yeah, I agree that economic crisis and capitalism will be a bit of theme. And it won't be a pretty view of it either.

Looks like my niche has hit the jackpot :tongue

Saskatoonistan
02-15-2009, 04:08 PM
Yeah, I agree that economic crisis and capitalism will be a bit of theme. And it won't be a pretty view of it either.

Looks like my niche has hit the jackpot :tongue

Oh man! How do you keep from becoming crippled with depression! I'm not even watching the news anymore because apparently, we're all doomed.

Stunted
02-15-2009, 04:12 PM
I hope that the 21st century has more than one theme. And if it has to have one, I hope it's up-beat.

Vincent
02-15-2009, 04:20 PM
What was the great theme of 20th century literature then?

qwerty
02-15-2009, 04:22 PM
I hope that the 21st century has more than one theme. And if it has to have one, I hope it's up-beat.

Me too. I write up-beat and humour, which I honestly beiieve we all need right now.

Reading about death and depression is not something I enjoy at any time, so if that's what's going to be on offer, I won't be buying books.

And if people don't buy books, writers are doomed. Now there's a depressing thought.

underthecity
02-15-2009, 05:18 PM
The great theme of 21st fiction literature is going to be...
death, according to a review I just read in The New York Times.

GOOD! That's one of the big themes in my novel.

deserata
02-15-2009, 06:34 PM
What was the great theme of 20th century literature then?
Death.

Seriously, though, I would say maybe disillusionment.

So is there any truth to what this great 21st century theme supposedly is? Or is it too soon to tell?

brokenfingers
02-15-2009, 07:03 PM
I don't pay particular attention to articles claiming to know the "next big thing".

Why not "hope" or "redemption" or "faith" or "rebirth" or any one of another number of themes people relate to? When times become dark people naturally seek light.

Ken
02-15-2009, 07:19 PM
...though excellent at relaying facts, The NY Times is notoriously lousy when it comes to predictions and accessments:

"Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools."
- New York Times editorial, 1921 (re: Robert Goddard's revolutionary rocket experimentation that led to space flight.)

Claudia Gray
02-15-2009, 09:03 PM
The great theme of a lot of literature, from prehistory to now, is death. It's a big theme! Every century's going to be able to use it.

What I think that article in the Times was specifically referring to, though, was the fact that the baby boomers are getting old, which means you're going to have a much larger percentage of the population in a position to perhaps relate more strongly to serious work with death as a theme.

qwerty
02-15-2009, 09:25 PM
What I think that article in the Times was specifically referring to, though, was the fact that the baby boomers are getting old, which means you're going to have a much larger percentage of the population in a position to perhaps relate more strongly to serious work with death as a theme.

But the last thing ageing people want to do is read about or dwell on death.