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scully931
02-08-2009, 11:59 PM
Hi,

Wasn't sure where to put this. Does anyone know of a reliable website that lists local writing groups? I signed up for one in the Pittsburgh area on Meetup but they never seem to meet. Or send messages. Or exist. Any information is appreciated. Hope this isn't in the wrong forum. :)

Wayne K
02-09-2009, 12:12 AM
Craigslist has some in groups.

sunandshadow
02-09-2009, 12:35 AM
Oh hey, I'm in the Pittsburgh area. I used to belong to Southwrites before I moved to Greenfield. There are more than 4 writers' groups in and around Pittsburgh so if you are having trouble with one, just join a different one...?

mario_c
02-09-2009, 12:41 AM
Meetup groups can be very unreliable unless it's a very large and established group. Yahoo has an index of groups as well, but many of them are online.

Guess face to face interaction is considered so 80s nowadays. :(

Karen Duvall
02-09-2009, 12:41 AM
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers (http://www.rmfw.org) is a national organization headquartered in Denver, Colorado, but they're an active group online. I've been a member for over 15 years and belong to a wonderful critique group that "meets" online twice a month. There's a monthly newsletter, too, and monthly programs, but the in-person events happen in Colorado so those living outside the area miss out. Still, it's a great group and the annual conference is one of the best in the country.

bsolah
02-09-2009, 03:19 AM
Most of the writer's groups I'm involved in are online like Southern Horror (the unofficial yahoo group of the Australian Horror Writers Association) but perhaps if you joined an online one you could establish a few select individuals to do a real life meetup...

That idea sounds so good I might do it myself :tongue

The Lonely One
02-09-2009, 03:24 AM
...I signed up for one in the Pittsburgh area on Meetup but they never seem to meet. Or send messages. Or exist... :)

Ha! Sorry I had to laugh at the way you phrased the bit about the suddenly-vanishing writer's group. Went from signing up to suddenly realizing that one-free-pizza from Domino's is expired.

This is a good question, though and I look forward to seeing responses. The only live writing group I've been involved with is a co-worker I use for crits and a couple college courses (which, of course, the workshops are mostly useless from the student side of it).

I'll sit back and take notes.

Carlene
02-09-2009, 03:41 AM
Check with the local library - if they don't have one, start your own. I've moved a lot in my life and find that's the fastest easiest way. I couldn't find one when living in Northboro, MA so put a notice on the library bulletin board and voila, several women contacted me. We started meeting in the library until we got to know one another, then moved into our homes. That was almost 30 years ago and several from the group still meet! AND most of them have gotten published in more form or another.

Carlene

Snowstorm
02-09-2009, 03:43 AM
I'd recommend checking with your local library or college (if you have one). Our libraries hold symposiums featuring published authors. A college 30 miles away also has symposiums of writers. Out a library symposium we set up a great writers group. Alas, it didn't last since we had writers driving up to 60 miles to meet. With our unreliable weather, it eventually quit.

Then in our tiny burg of 26 residents, we have a writers group! We meet every other week in winter, and weather is no problem since we all walk.

Perhaps letting your local librarian know you may be interested in starting a writers group might kick off one.

The Rav
02-09-2009, 04:19 AM
I have a question for those of you in on-line writing groups. Are you happy with the results? Is it a good substitute for meeting in a "real live" group?

bsolah
02-09-2009, 04:26 AM
I have a question for those of you in on-line writing groups. Are you happy with the results? Is it a good substitute for meeting in a "real live" group?

I guess it all depends on what you want to get out of the group.

The group I mainly participate in (Southern Horror) is mainly a bunch of Aussie horror writers discussing markets, the latest horror movies and random stuff to do with writing. It's a good support group and a way to promote Aussie horror to the rest of us.

If you're looking for a critique or beta readers, you can also put the call out. I've gotten some great crits from folks off-list because of this.

laidback
02-09-2009, 05:38 AM
Hi,

Wasn't sure where to put this. Does anyone know of a reliable website that lists local writing groups? I signed up for one in the Pittsburgh area on Meetup but they never seem to meet. Or send messages. Or exist. Any information is appreciated. Hope this isn't in the wrong forum. :)

Hi Scully, Penn Writers has groups all over the state, including three in Pittsburgh. They're also hosting a big conference in Pittsburgh in May.

Start here: http://www.pennwriters.com/

-Steve

scully931
02-10-2009, 10:12 PM
Hi Scully, Penn Writers has groups all over the state, including three in Pittsburgh. They're also hosting a big conference in Pittsburgh in May.

Start here: http://www.pennwriters.com/

-Steve

Oh, thank you! Very helpful indeed. Thanks for all the responses. I'm not sure why but an online writing group never really entered my mind. I will check all these things out. :)

c.e.lawson
02-10-2009, 10:46 PM
With two children and a part-time job, I've found on line writing groups to have a convenience factor that works for me. My writing friends and I made our own. We've done it on LiveJournal by creating our own closed community (that way when you post your work, it's not public). One I'm currently in (though I'm on hiatus while I beta a friend's novel) works like this:

5 members

All members post each Monday, reporting their writing progress on the last week and goals for the next week. (Great for keeping us accountable) We really focus on the writing, so this doesn't become a social hour. This is required - members must be timely and offer support/comments to the others, or the cohesiveness and rapport suffers.

One member per week posts a piece for critique and all other members are required to post critiques in a timely fashion, by adding comments to the post. (If you're familiar with LJ, you'll know what I mean here.)

IF a member doesn't have a piece to post for critique, then he or she is welcome to bring up any writing related discussion or ask a writing related question.

I think this group has worked out well, though we've found it REALLY makes a difference if all of the members are on the same page as far as seriousness about the craft, and commitment to participating in the group. If a member is lazy about posting or commenting on others' posts, it really brings the morale down. We've had a bit of turnover due to these issues, but the core of the group has remained consistent.

c.e.