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Kate Thornton
02-07-2009, 11:32 PM
...Take Away From Your Writing?

I participate in a lot of the threads here at AW - it's a wonderful place for writers of all persuasions, all genres, all disciplines.

I participate in many of the Hot Button or controversial threads, too - Soft Core P&E, Office Party, TIO, and here in Round Table. I have strong opinions, readily voice them, and sometimes can even see the other side of an argument.

But I find that I might get too wrapped up in issues sometimes and spend more time on them than my writing.

Does this happen to you too? Or is it all grist for your writing mill?

Cranky
02-07-2009, 11:34 PM
...Take Away From Your Writing?

I participate in a lot of the threads here at AW - it's a wonderful place for writers of all persuasions, all genres, all disciplines.

I participate in many of the Hot Button or controversial threads, too - Soft Core P&E, Office Party, TIO, and here in Round Table. I have strong opinions, readily voice them, and sometimes can even see the other side of an argument.

But I find that I might get too wrapped up in issues sometimes and spend more time on them than my writing.

Does this happen to you too? Or is it all grist for your writing mill?

Grist for the mill, baby. :D I've gotten a lot of ideas from these discussions, so I think it's a "value-added" aspect of the place.

semilargeintestine
02-07-2009, 11:35 PM
It doesn't bother me. If I'm on here, I'm actually more likely to get writing done because I'm already on the computer. It's that other crap in my life that makes it hard to write as much as I'd like.

thethinker42
02-07-2009, 11:36 PM
I don't find that they take away from my writing. If a particular discussion REALLY rubs me the wrong way, or gets me too fired up, it might kill an hour or two of productivity for me...but in general, no, it doesn't affect me. I sometimes have to remind myself to step back from the discussion during working hours. I goof off on AW in the mornings, then start writing between 12-1...if it gets to be 12:57 and I'm still faffing about on a thread, I make myself close the window and start writing. If it's a REALLY interesting or fast-paced discussion, I'll often write 1,000 words or so...come back to the thread...write another 1,000 words or so...come back to the thread.

I can only think of a handful of times where an online discussion got me so fired up or distracted that it actually killed my writing mojo for the day.

Wayne K
02-08-2009, 01:22 AM
If I didn't come here to get away from life I would probably drop acid and play with razor blades. Heated discussions are the only real good ones since I'm married and don't intercheat.

scarletpeaches
02-08-2009, 01:24 AM
I've occasionally got so angry at discussions that I've kept hitting refresh like a mad thing to see if the fuckwit who got me so riled has posted again.

Then I usually calm down after a few hours - or at least learn to use that anger in an "I'll show them!" way.

Getting riled at someone else is fuel for me (although not the only emotion which gives me encouagement). It certainly doesn't stop me writing.

StevenJ
02-08-2009, 01:31 AM
I've occasionally got so angry at discussions that I've kept hitting refresh like a mad thing to see if the fuckwit who got me so riled has posted again.


:hi:

Clair Dickson
02-08-2009, 01:42 AM
This place provides me with some much need social interactions. But sometimes it does make it hard to write... I want to see what's going on in the conversations and such. I'm more susceptible to this when I'm having trouble with a story, so it's often more a symptom than a problem. =)

Polenth
02-08-2009, 07:38 AM
It takes longer to write posts when I know everyone is angry. One wrong word, and they'll discount everything I say and go off on some strange angry tangent because they think I said something I didn't. I don't get wrapped up in it outside of writing the post.

When I was younger (on other forums), I was more interested in taking part, as I helped me to understand anger (which I don't feel). I'm less inclined to take part now. I'd rather use the time elsewhere.

rugcat
02-08-2009, 07:55 AM
I've definitely had my writing time cut into by a particularly interesting or contentious thread.

But I usually have the discipline to leave for a few hours and not even check in when i really need to get some writing done.

Like now.

Bubastes
02-08-2009, 07:57 AM
I find that the more heated threads are an energy drain for me, so I usually avoid them.

brainstorm77
02-08-2009, 08:54 AM
I tend to stay out of them.

blueobsidian
02-08-2009, 09:06 AM
I stay away from the more emotionally charged sections of the forum. I tend to be far too easy to agitate and while most people on here are really cool, sometimes people just come along and rub me the wrong way. I agree with what Bubastes said about those threads being an energy drain -- that's exactly how I feel whenever I get into them.

Besides, I have an itchy trigger finger when I get riled up. I hit "post" too quickly after typing emotionally-based responses and can contribute negatively to those things.

nevada
02-08-2009, 09:28 AM
i usually forget the threads i post in so half the time i miss out on some heated discussions. others i just walk away from when i realize it's not a debate but a he said/she said thing. that said, i have decided to stay out of PC&E and SYW for a while.

tehuti88
02-08-2009, 06:57 PM
I don't even visit most of the forums mentioned (aside from this here, the Roundtable); I limit myself to writing-related forums where my posts actually end up in my post count!

I just haven't the time or desire to debate people on their opinions, especially since neither of us is likely to change our mind. (Though, sadly, this does sometimes happen even in writing-related talk. I once got picked apart for offering my opinion on a certain genre and it still rankles me to read posts by that person. I've learned to say, "This is just my opinion, it's neither right nor wrong" more often than I should have to. :( ) And I don't write about the stuff I encounter online in my fiction so...no grist here.

I'm on a writing site to talk about writing, that's all. I imagine that ANY time spent doing anything other than writing is time taken away from writing, so... :o

lkp
02-08-2009, 07:02 PM
My place for passionate discussion on AW is the historical novels forum (yeah, what can I say? We're wild in there.) I definitely use it as a procrastination device. But since everything we discuss is relevant to my writing, I think it is worth it.

brainstorm77
02-08-2009, 10:24 PM
And don't forget.. Some just like to provoke period to get a reaction.

WriteKnight
02-08-2009, 10:30 PM
Religion and Politics are the hunting grounds for trolls. People who post something just to get a rise out of others. They feed on selectively 'hearing' only parts of responses - ignoring evidence, or setting up 'strawman' arguments.

If you find yourself in such a cesspool - it's time to leave. Just wipe your feet and wash your hands of them. And make note of those incapable of anything but ad hominum attacks.

Generally, I tend to avoid them.

(PS: "Platform Wars" - Mac VS PC are almost as bad as religion and politics.)

scarletpeaches
02-08-2009, 11:03 PM
It's amazing how frisky folks get even in writing fora. Try getting out alive when they're onto:

Outlining/not outlining
Lord of the Rings
Stephenie Meyer
Christopher Paolini
Use of swear words
Underlining to show italics
Courier New/Times New Roman
Dan Brown
Fanfiction
Claiming to write for oneself, not for publication
Writing out of sequence or in order
Head jumpingad infinitum...

semilargeintestine
02-08-2009, 11:07 PM
It's amazing how frisky folks get even in writing fora. Try getting out alive when they're onto:
Outlining/not outlining
Lord of the Rings
Stephenie Meyer
Christopher Paolini
Use of swear words
Underlining to show italics
Courier New/Times New Roman
Dan Brown
Fanfiction
Claiming to write for oneself, not for publication
Writing out of sequence or in order
Head jumpingad infinitum...

For just a second, I thought you said "writing flora."

Anyway, I separate my writing from posting on here (save for the SYW). As soon as I pull up a project, anything I was thinking about this forum completely disappears. I'm pretty good at dropping things like that.

Samantha's_Song
02-08-2009, 11:35 PM
I love politics and I love arguing the toss about very many controversial things in life and in this world. However, when I joined up with AW, I decided that I would get involved with very few hot topics not about writing, as I would be spending all day on here instead of just a few hours of it :D


But I find that I might get too wrapped up in issues sometimes and spend more time on them than my writing.

Does this happen to you too? Or is it all grist for your writing mill?

Miguelito
02-09-2009, 07:43 AM
I spent time at the really charged forums here at first, then just decided to keep away. I get distracted from what I really want to do: write.

kuwisdelu
02-09-2009, 08:05 AM
It doesn't bother me. If I'm on here, I'm actually more likely to get writing done because I'm already on the computer. It's that other crap in my life that makes it hard to write as much as I'd like.

Me too.

If I'm on here, there's usually something or other that would keep me from writing anyway. Getting caught up in a heated discussion is only distracting every once in a while--usually there's something else distracting me that leads me to decide "hey, let's see what's going on on AW now" anyway.

I don't usually get much inspiration from them, though, so it's not really fuel for me. Every once in a while, a topic will come up that's in one of my stories and it can renew interest in that story, which happens a couple nights ago with a recent P&CE topic. That said, I try to keep politics out of my writing. Sometime it will involve an inherently political topic (say, abortion or drugs), but I'll avoid saying anything about it, because tackling those issues isn't what my writing's about. They're just part of my characters' lives.


It takes longer to write posts when I know everyone is angry. One wrong word, and they'll discount everything I say and go off on some strange angry tangent because they think I said something I didn't. I don't get wrapped up in it outside of writing the post.

On the other hand, it's good practice for making us more careful writers.