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Inkspill
02-02-2009, 12:57 AM
Oh, parents.

As a teenager, I keep my parents fairly involved in my life and my hobbies. My mother's read my first two novels, but not my most recent one. In some ways, I'm rather hesitant to show her because it features a bisexual main character. My parents are fairly conservative (read: not very LGBT friendly)--and although they know my work is always fiction, I'm afraid they'll see me in a different light.

So I'm holding off on showing them the whole plot, though they know the title (SMOOCH: About a girl who turns into a frog and must kiss her frog-phobic lover before she gets dissected) and part of the plot.

If you wrote as a teenager (or if you are one), where are your parents during the writing process? Do they know you write?

What I'm really interested in is: where does the line cross between information and privacy? Does it really matter right now, because if you do get published, the whole world will know what the novel is about anyway?

Do you trust them to know that fiction is fiction and not an image of yourself?

Discussion's welcome. =)

Mr. Anonymous
02-02-2009, 01:33 AM
My parents know I write but they don't read it. (Though my dad tried to, after I explicitly told him no...)

My stance on the matter is pretty simple. If I get published and they want to go out and buy the book and read for themselves, well, I won't be able to stop them. But so long as it's not published, they don't get to read.

Then again, I'm a pretty private/introverted person. None of my friends know that I write, much less read it.

And regarding "fiction is fiction." I'm not sure I'd be so dismissive. I once heard someone say that writing is a window into the author's soul. Some works may be more autobiographical, some less, but authors almost always draw some measure of inspiration from their own lives, whether on a conscious or sub-conscious level. In my opinion, writing is, in many ways, like a psychological finger print.

scarletpeaches
02-02-2009, 01:35 AM
I'm 32 now and have lived on my own for well over eleven years.

When I was a teen, I wrote. My parents (mother and stepdad) knew I did, but never read anything of it. I didn't offer, they didn't ask. I'm sure my mother snooped so I locked everything up in my wardrobe and kept the only key with me at all times.

If anything was published these days I doubt I would advertise the fact around my dad. I'd feel icky knowing that he knew I write rude stuffs. ;)

Inkspill
02-02-2009, 01:40 AM
And regarding "fiction is fiction." I'm not sure I'd be so dismissive. I once heard someone say that writing is a window into the author's soul. Some works may be more autobiographical, some less, but authors almost always draw some measure of inspiration from their own lives, whether on a conscious or sub-conscious level.
I agree that most fiction draws from the author's life and own experiences, but some people believe fiction is almost entirely drawn from real life. And thought I couldn't be turned into a frog, the possibility of me and LGBT issues may be cemented in my parents' eyes. Yikes.

I think I'm a more private writer from now on, anyway. Hah.

ETA: For my first novel, my mother asked, I shared willingly. For this, she asked, I refused and gave the bare minimum saying I didn't want to jinx it.
Hm.

GirlWithPoisonPen
02-02-2009, 01:46 AM
I never shared what I wrote in high school with my mom. She's very critical of me, so why give her opportunity? KWIM?

So write what you want to write and share it with them when you feel comfortable. But if you think they will construe your book as making a statement about you and your sexuality, then it would be wise to talk to them before the book becomes a major best seller. It'll be worse if they hear about it from a neighbor.

ChaosTitan
02-02-2009, 02:06 AM
I've been writing stories since I was twelve, and my parents always knew it. I had a lot of creative hobbies, and I think they always saw writing as just another hobby (along with sketching, jewelry making, sewing, etc...). They never asked to read anything, and the only time I remember offering was when I had to write a short story for class and wanted my mom's opinion. The only other thing she's ever read of mine is a novel-length fanfic (we both loved the show) I wrote nine years ago. My dad's read one of my screenplays, because we developed the idea together during a road trip.

Honestly, I think they always saw my love of writing as a hobby to be tolerated...until I called them last summer and said I had a contract. :D

KikiteNeko
02-02-2009, 02:14 AM
I don't show many people my writing, aside from writer friends and my agent. I figure my family will read if/when I get published.

But as a teenager, my parents were always supportive of my writing although I didn't show them anything I wrote. I still, at 24, don't share my writing with them. The one time I showed it to my mom (an avid romance novel reader, and that is not what I write), she didn't get it and her comments kinda annoyed me. (she said things like "so is this character based off of me? Is this character based off [insert whomever]" and "is this guy horny? is he gonna boink that girl?" and "so who were you thinking of when you wrote this?").

I'd rather keep my writing from my mom than alter it to maintain her opinion of me, though.

Bubastes
02-02-2009, 02:30 AM
And regarding "fiction is fiction." I'm not sure I'd be so dismissive. I once heard someone say that writing is a window into the author's soul. Some works may be more autobiographical, some less, but authors almost always draw some measure of inspiration from their own lives, whether on a conscious or sub-conscious level. In my opinion, writing is, in many ways, like a psychological finger print.

I tend to disagree with this. My life is quite conventional, so I draw my inspiration from the lives of other people. If my fiction reflects me in any way, I guess it shows that I'm incredibly nosy about other people's lives and that I love gossip. It's a good thing I confine all that to the page. In real life, I'm the quiet one eavesdropping on everyone else's conversations (and taking notes :D).

As far as the original question goes, no, I don't trust my parents, or even other people, not to read too much in my writing. I've even had to explain to some people that the "I" in some of my first person POV stories is NOT ME. Oh well, at least I'm able to write well enough to make people think that my stories actually happened. These days, I'm getting too old to care what other people think.

Alan Yee
02-02-2009, 02:44 AM
My parents are very supportive of me and my writing endeavors. However, they already know that I don't like to share my writing with them. I know they'll still love me no matter what, but I think it's partly not knowing how my parents will react if they read it. Mostly I'm worried they wouldn't approve of me writing about adult situations and such. I also tend to have LGBT characters in most of my work, and since I'm not sure how my parents would react, I don't want them to read it. They aren't extremely conservative, but I still feel uncomfortable with trying to address the whole sexuality topic at the moment.

Thankfully, my parents respect my preference for them not to read my stories and novel that I've been working on. (By the way, I'm 17. I'll be 18 in October.)

ETA: My writing is not really autobiographical. I've written about sex and violence when I've never had sex or done anything violent in my life. Still, there is that fear that someone may read more into my writing than what is really there.

KosseMix
02-02-2009, 02:52 AM
My dad isn't interested in reading anything I write, and my mom said she doesn't want to read anything I write until I get published.

So, that's pretty much that.

TheRealFnShow
02-02-2009, 02:52 AM
They've never read anything I've written. I can't honestly say they know if I do. By virtue of my choice of Uni Course, they should at least know I'm interested in it if they haven't figured out I do it. They've never asked, though. And I sure won't offer.

bsolah
02-02-2009, 03:00 AM
My parents know I write. They think it's a bit weird and a waste of time. But they also think that about my involvement in socialist politics. Sometimes to parents, all that matters is a job, getting married and having kids.

I'm pretty open about most of the beliefs that disagree with, so if they read my stories they wouldn't be shocked if I included a GLBTI character.

Though the one time my mum read a story of mine about a father killing his son, my mum was kind of freaked out. She thought it was code for my own father being abusive. Which was not the case.

I think they've read the other stories I've posted online, and I know a lot of my family read my blog and as they're conservatives, hate it, but they just say they're "disappointed" in me.

Pagey's_Girl
02-02-2009, 03:10 AM
My mom's never read any of it, but she's very supportive. My father thought it was a big waste of time. He loved quoting statistics to me that "nobody" ever gets published and besides, nobody would ever want to read the garbage I wrote so I might as well not bother. He didn't even know what I wrote, nor did he care to find out.

I think he was just jealous. He read a lot of SF and political thrillers, and I think he hated the fact that I can string words into coherent sentences and make them into stories and he couldn't have if his life depended on it.

Ciera_
02-02-2009, 03:18 AM
My mom is epically supportive, but I haven't told my dad yet. (They're divorced, anyhow.) I'm sure he'd be proud, but I really don't want to get into what my books are about and all that with him. He's not a reader, and I wouldn't want him to feel obligated to read my books in any way. He'd be really proud, I'm sure, but I don't get into touchy-feely discussions with my dad, and he'd probably want to know everything there is to know. Either that or he might not quite grasp how serious I am about this and just never think about it again after the initial discussion. Neither option appeal to me, actually. Another thing is that my MC's dad is a total deadbeat asshole, and I don't want my dad to be offended by that because it's entirely fictitious, only there because it belongs in the story.
As for my mom... I said I'd give her the book when the rewrite is done and it's a bit...better. I would rather she read only my best work. There are no sex scenes in the first book, little mention of sex, and only a few kisses, so I'm not TOO uncomfortable giving it to her. As for book 2 . . . it's a little more edgy, which I know she'd be fine with (my mom is the least conservative person in Alberta, surely) but still I'd feel a little embarrassed to have her read it. One step at a time. What matters is that she's 100% supportive and very proud that I've finished a whole novel already.

On the topic of whether fiction is fiction . . . my plot is ALL fiction. But my characters . . . I sort of put a characteristic or two of my own into each character, and lots of them into my MCs. Most of my little traits and habits and such are split evenly between my MC and her sister; I can treat them sort of like my split personalities.
All in all, I'm more likely to draw from various shows/books than I am to put my own life into my writing. My own life is boring that's why I write in the first place.

scarletpeaches
02-02-2009, 03:31 AM
I don't believe anyone writes a book without putting a huge chunk of themselves in it.

Maybe it's not directly culled from real life, but your life definitely influences what you produce, you can bet on it.

For instance, I've never written about a character who had an abusive childhood, but I've written about betrayal and dysfunction. It all comes back to writing what you know.

I don't believe we can help but to write what we know...or rather, what we feel.

Miss.Stefani
02-02-2009, 03:33 AM
I don't think my mom knows that I write. Well, I don't think she knows that I write anything other than a fanfic I wrote a few years ago.

I've just never told her, though I'm not sure why. Probably because she would eventually want to read something, and I would feel awkward. I don't tell anyone about my writing, so I definitely don't want them reading it. Sure, they'd say it was good, but I would always wonder if they were just trying to spare my feelings.

bsolah
02-02-2009, 03:35 AM
I totally agree Scarlet.

Perhaps we didn't have abusive parents, but our friends may of. Experiences that other people have around you can also influence you, though probably not as deeply.

I often write about characters affected by racism. I'm white and have never been discriminated against, though have friends who have.

sheadakota
02-02-2009, 03:35 AM
Inkspill, be glad your parents are interested in your writing and maybe have a bit more faith in how they might feel about your current theme.

I haven't been a teenager for a while, but I did write as a teen. when I completed my first novel at 19, I was scared to death to show it to anyone- you know- is it good? Does it suck? I took a deep breath, screwed up my courage and asked my mom to read it- She was an avid reader and I valued her opinion (at the time)

Well, she told me to put it on the coffee table and she would get to it when she ws done with the book she was reading- I placed the hand written MS down and waited --- FOR 6 MONTHS---- It never moved, collected dust until I finally took it back. I never told her and she never noticed it gone. To this day (I am 47) She doesn't know how badly she hurt me- I have NEVER asked her to read anythng else, neither of my parents know I am trying to get published or have completed several novels- they probably never will (They are 78) My entire relationship changed forever with my mom and it is a fault on my part, but I can't forgive her.

Chanelley
02-02-2009, 03:46 AM
My parents know I write and claim they're supportive in my publishing quest, but secretly I don't think they think I'll ever actually get published. Neither of them have read my work and my dad is more supportive, telling me to try hardest in what I really want to do (but not drop out of Uni yet haha). They briefly know its contents: A girl who can see the dead and falls in love with a boy who turns out to be the one thing she was trained to fight against: a vampire. My mum said she'll read it, but no one out of my friends and family are allowed to until it's in book form. That's my own little rule haha.

Oh and I know when it comes out, I'll feel a bit uncomfortable about my nan and other family members reading it because they're either really religious or not into fantasy at all. But they'd read it just to see my writing ability. There are some saucy scenes too, which might give my nan a heart attack! I don't actually think my parents would read it right through tbh. Neither of them are readers at all. Magazines and newspapers: yes. Books: not unless my mums sunbathing on a beach somewhere.

Alan Yee
02-02-2009, 03:47 AM
I don't believe anyone writes a book without putting a huge chunk of themselves in it.

Maybe it's not directly culled from real life, but your life definitely influences what you produce, you can bet on it.

For instance, I've never written about a character who had an abusive childhood, but I've written about betrayal and dysfunction. It all comes back to writing what you know.

...

I don't believe we can help but to write what we know...or rather, what we feel.

Now that I can agree with. You can certainly tell what I was feeling at the time I wrote certain parts of my book. I often have an easier time writing about certain topics or feelings than talking about them.

scarletpeaches
02-02-2009, 03:52 AM
I think a lot of the time fiction isn't about relating facts, but it's definitely about the author telling his/her truth.

If that doesn't sound too a) wanky b) pretentious and c) deraily.

bsolah
02-02-2009, 03:57 AM
It sounds spot on.

Ciera_
02-02-2009, 04:01 AM
I often have an easier time writing about certain topics or feelings than talking about them.

Wow. I've never really considered this, but that's really true of me, as well. Maybe that's why we become writers; we're too maladjusted or dysfunctional or whatever to express our feelings normally, and writing becomes our therapy, the tool we use unwittingly to let stuff out. It might not be until much later, when we're looking back, that we realize how the writing drew our emotions/issues out of us.
[/end attempt at philosophical analysis]

Horserider
02-02-2009, 04:04 AM
My mom knows I write, but I won't let her within reading distance of my work. She's also a writer and loves telling me about her writing ventures, but I tend to be more protective of mine. Reason being that before whenever I let her read something I wrote or tell her about an idea she'd make fun of it. I know she's just joking around, but it still hurts that my mom is making fun of something that I wrote.

My mom doesn't know that I want to be published. She wants to publish her children's book that she just wrote and I won't get in the way of that even though I think if she tries she's in for a rude awakening (she thinks children's books are easier to get into. in this particular book she has a picture picked out for every page). If I get so far as querying I'll probably tell her what I'm up to. I'll have to if I want to be published since I'm a minor.

firedrake
02-02-2009, 04:13 AM
My parents were always OK with my writing, on the grounds that I wasn't out doing things I shouldn't have been doing, as a teenager.

My Dad has read everything I've written in the 8 months and has been brilliant. Apart from anything else, because he's retired, he's been helping with the research, especially with the WW2 novel - the trains, buses, everyday life in England during the war, etc.

I should add that I did feel a bit odd sending him the chapters with the rude bits. There is one chapter where the MCs are "at it" all over the place in a cottage and he said, "Bloody hell, never mind about calling the place Poplar Cottage, it should be called Rabbit Cottage."

bsolah
02-02-2009, 04:16 AM
Wow, firedrake, that's really cool that your dad is taking such an active role in helping you.

Leaf
02-02-2009, 04:25 AM
My dad appreciates my taste in writing and reading, and we often sit down and just discuss authors such as Dan Brown and Stephen King. However, I'm always refusing to allow him to read my work. Though I've promised him I'd let him read my first standalone published work, I've forbidden both of my parents from reading and WIPs and completed short stories or poems.

Why? I feel that though my parents can be fairly blunt, sometimes I can tell when they're holding back their critiques. My mother thinks everything I write is "fantastic", even a bombshell of a short story I wrote back in 9th grade. Frankly, I usually just send materials for review and such to several literature reviewers, English-intensive friends, and old English teachers of mine. Works like a charm.

Kate Thornton
02-02-2009, 04:43 AM
My parents never knew I wrote and I regret it now as they are both gone and cannot share my successes. But to be fair, they were neither of them big readers, although they valued education for their children, we always had books in the house and were read to as tykes. There is so much I miss now, so much that I wish I could say to them - I guess writing isn't the most important thing.

Parents can be supportive, indifferent or hostile to your writing, but it's how they raise you so you can develop into a good person that really counts.

I think family - even supportive family - is where you get lots of things, but not critiques.

Shurikane
02-02-2009, 06:31 AM
Let's see...

Father deceased, knew I wrote as a casual hobby, didn't care so long as I got my work done.

Mother, tends to cackle and ridicule whatever she reads reads and finds funny or strange, known for snooping around, would probably either laugh or get freaked out at my ideas, knows I write, considers writing to be pathetic. I religiously protect my work from her sight.

C.bronco
02-02-2009, 06:34 AM
Both of my parents write, and know me well enough. To calm them, however, I'd start with a disclaimer including the dictionary definition of "fiction."

Then again, my mom photoshopped my brother's face onto the Mona Lisa, and has it on a cabinet in her family room. We all love it, and call it "The Mona Andy." He just has that beatific smile....

but I digress.

RE: Kate- my parents critiques have always been, "Send the next chapter." LOL

Mr. Anonymous
02-02-2009, 07:36 AM
Yea, perhaps I wasn't really clear in my original post. By autobiographical, I didn't mean things that only happened to you. I was speaking more generally about your life, the lives it intersects, the things you believe in and feel strongly about, the way you think and see the world, etc. Hence the bit about the psychological fingerprint.

On another note, it makes me very sad to hear about all the parents that don't seem to care or who are actually hostile to writing.

My parents are sure as hell not perfect... But it sort of makes me appreciate them a little more, knowing that they are supportive of my writing. I can't understand what would make people who love you act any other way... If I ever acted like that to my son/daughter about anything, I hope he/she would have the guts to tell me off or something...

Shady Lane
02-02-2009, 07:38 AM
My parents didn't know I wrote until I had that oh-so-awkward, "Hi, I was just offered a contract. Can you cosign?" question.

They're very supportive and everything...or they would be, if I gave them the chance. But it's too much like them seeing me naked. I'd just rather they didn't think about me in that way, you know?

bsolah
02-02-2009, 07:42 AM
I guess it is sad. Creative endevours like writing really aren't valued in this society. And people's parents, especially in these troubled economic times, are probably worried about our futures and whether we'll be able to get a job, keep a job, earn enough to live etc.

I guess my parents still aren't supportive, but they don't bug me about my writing like they did when I was unemployed, where she thought (wrongly) that I was subordinating job hunting to my writing.

tehuti88
02-02-2009, 07:40 PM
I'm not a teenager but still live with my parents, always have (disabled).

They've always known I write but they aren't interested in reading any of it. There was a time when I really wanted them to read it, but by now I'd just be too embarrassed. I simply wish they could be more supportive of it, is all. (They think writing is useless unless one is getting published and making money off it.)

As far as I know they have no clue I write adult stories (namely--erotica and lots of GLBT themes), and having seen how they think, it's best for me not to tell them. Sad to say.

I'm not getting published so it's not like "the whole world" will know what I write, but my stuff is out there on the Web and there's the chance they could find it, which would probably not turn out well. Which is why it's probably best that they're not in the least bit interested in my writing. My writing isn't me (even though there's a lot of me in it, I don't advocate a lot of the nasty stuff that goes on in it--plus, even the stuff that I do agree with, people around me don't), but people around me can't seem to tell the difference. I really did have a parent snark about how my characters swear a lot, even though I myself don't swear AT ALL in real life--they assumed that since the character does it, I must be for it in some way. Good thing they don't know what goes on in the rest of my writing. *sigh*

Where is the line between information and privacy? Wherever you feel most comfortable. That's honestly all I can say.

kaitlin008
02-02-2009, 08:14 PM
My parents have always known I write. In fact, it was probably my mom's encouragement when I was really young that made me write outside of school. It's been a very long time since I've let either of my parents read anything I wrote, because it feels very private to me. But they and my sister now know that I'm trying to get published, and they're supportive of it. My mom is almost TOO supportive - she told everyone she knows that I'd written a book, and although I appreciate that she is proud of me, I sort of wish she'd not prematurely raise people's expectations! I know she'll read it if it gets published. I think my dad will too, though I can't picture him enjoying it - I write fantasy, and he likes biographies and other nonfiction books, mainly. My sister and boyfriend will probably both skim it, since neither of them really loves to read all that much. But everyone has always been supportive - it's not like writing has taken over my life in an unhealthy way, so why would they be anything else?

KD_Kilker
02-03-2009, 06:32 AM
My parents know that I write, but my dad doesn't have faith in me. He thinks the writing just a phase, an excuse I give mom so that she'd let my stay on the computer for hours. He doesn't seem to get that I'm working on something, and not just messing around on myspace and chatting. He's got a "That's cute, daughter, but it isn't going to give you a future, or take care of your horse" kind of attitude about it, and he's playing the "It's like you care more about playing games on the computer than you do about family/school/your horse" game with me; and he's recently taken to telling me that I'm getting fat to scare me away from writing. He's also uber-conservative, and doesn't condone my writing vampire novels.

My mom, though, thinks the exact opposite - she knows how serious I am about this. She's even going to help me send out queries and whatnot.

selkn.asrai
02-03-2009, 09:33 AM
My parents admired my skill in writing academic papers and my ability to edit/proof while I was in school.

They have no idea that I'm pursuing writing in fiction--or pursuing writing at all--and I want to keep it that way because of the nature of our relationship. If I ever succeed, they will find out. I've always been so uncomfortable with people I know being informed of my goals. I'm obsessively secretive about the things I want to accomplish. *shrugs*

Spiny Norman
02-03-2009, 09:53 PM
My parents are both huge readers. They've read most of what I've written. As far as books I've written, let's see... Six novels in all. There's only a few that I've felt good enough about to let them read. They were supportive of it, especially my mom, and when the first few inevitably failed she was the one who said that the books didn't sound like me, but someone copying someone else.

Then I wrote the fourth one, and she read it, and she called me while I was driving home from work crying and said it was the best thing I'd written and she was sure someone would see it for what it was and get it published.

She was right.

Pamster
02-03-2009, 10:48 PM
My mother has read a lot of what I've written and she never makes fun of it. But she will pull out the red pen and edit...That is just what she enjoys, editing. I am always flattered when she reads and says there's not much to change-LOL!!! ;)

Kate Thornton
02-04-2009, 03:31 AM
Then I wrote the fourth one, and she read it, and she called me while I was driving home from work crying and said it was the best thing I'd written and she was sure someone would see it for what it was and get it published.

She was right.


My mother has read a lot of what I've written and she never makes fun of it. But she will pull out the red pen and edit...That is just what she enjoys, editing. I am always flattered when she reads and says there's not much to change-LOL!!! ;)

You guys have parents that sound ideal! You are lucky folks!

LOG
02-04-2009, 08:03 AM
I'm just starting out writing.
My mother seems to be leery of believing whether or not I can pull it off, I sort of am too.
My dad doesn't really seem to care, same with my bro.

kuwisdelu
02-04-2009, 10:19 AM
They're very supportive and everything...or they would be, if I gave them the chance. But it's too much like them seeing me naked. I'd just rather they didn't think about me in that way, you know?

That's pretty much how I feel. My parents know writing is important to me, but I rarely show them my work.

HelloKiddo
02-04-2009, 10:35 AM
Well, she told me to put it on the coffee table and she would get to it when she ws done with the book she was reading- I placed the hand written MS down and waited --- FOR 6 MONTHS---- It never moved, collected dust until I finally took it back. I never told her and she never noticed it gone. To this day (I am 47) She doesn't know how badly she hurt me- I have NEVER asked her to read anythng else, neither of my parents know I am trying to get published or have completed several novels- they probably never will (They are 78) My entire relationship changed forever with my mom and it is a fault on my part, but I can't forgive her.

How awful, that must have really hurt. I'm sorry you had to go through that :(


What I'm really interested in is: where does the line cross between information and privacy? Does it really matter right now, because if you do get published, the whole world will know what the novel is about anyway?

Do you trust them to know that fiction is fiction and not an image of yourself?You don't mention your age, but if you're under 18 and still living at home I don't think you should share with them a story that might cause problems. What for? Unless it gets published it's only you writing for yourself (and at your age it's unlikely to get published yet.) You wouldn't show them your journal would you?

When you've grown, moved out, and gotten published you can show them then, but for now I wouldn't.

Phoebe H
02-04-2009, 11:13 AM
My parents knew that I wrote when I was a teenager. I never showed them any of it, and they knew better than to ask. Now, my *brother* has read a lot of my stuff...but that's different.


I don't believe anyone writes a book without putting a huge chunk of themselves in it.

Maybe it's not directly culled from real life, but your life definitely influences what you produce, you can bet on it.

I agree with this very much.

I think the tricky thing is that even if we are putting a large piece of ourselves in our stories, and working through issues, a lot of times the part that is "important" to us is not the thing that is most noticeable to anyone else. Those noticeable things are often the things we are doing consciously, but it's the thematic and subconscious things that are actually telling. And *those* can often only be pulled out from looking at a large body of your work.

Lord knows I look back at the stuff I wrote years ago and *now* the stuff I was trying to work through is painfully obvious to see, even though back then I didn't realize what it was.

And the only thing worse than having a parent go off on a stupidly wild tangent from reading a story of mine would have been if *they* had picked up on my issues before I did. That would have been embarrassing.

Better not to let them read anything.

scarletpeaches
02-04-2009, 04:28 PM
Also - what is important to us might not serve the story one little bit.

Yes, eighteen-year-old-scarletpeaches, this means YOU.

c2ckim
02-04-2009, 04:45 PM
My parents were very proud of my writing. They never got to see the finished product, my first book, but they were very supportive while they were both alive. They died within 10 days of each other two years ago now, but my Mom read everything I wrote and my Dad was very proud of the fact that his daughter was going to be published one day. I'm only sorry they didn't get to see my first book :(

Rarri
02-04-2009, 05:20 PM
My mother has read a lot of what I've written and she never makes fun of it. But she will pull out the red pen and edit...That is just what she enjoys, editing. I am always flattered when she reads and says there's not much to change-LOL!!! ;)

Same with my mother, she's great considering how i bombard her with emails of new material. My dad on the other hand, despite being a writer himself, doesn't read anything i've written, my mother may give him the gist of something i've written but he wont read it himself, he struggles reading anything remotely 'fantasy'.

citymouse
02-04-2009, 05:24 PM
I took my degree in journalism just as my father had wanted to do. The depression ended that dream. Both parents died before I began writing but the way I was raised and treated by them has had a definite impact on what and how I write.
C

MDei
02-05-2009, 07:29 AM
My parents don't read my stuff. My dad is too busy and my mother is too formal. She's one ofthose people who never relaxes her dialect. So when she reads something, she won't care what's in it, she see the grammar mistakes and then she won't like how my character, most of them teenagers talk. But, it has to be realistic. Not many teenagers talk properly amongst themselves even though a lot of them know how.

She also might not approve of my young adult romance. It's not really edgy, but there's some stuff in it she definitely is going to ask me about. She'll see as a reflection of me even though I'm no doing it. I figure she can read it when it's published and by then there won't be any use questioning my moral. For the moment, I rather keep it to myself and my best friend (who I won't tell her is my best friend because he's a boy).

Elidibus
02-05-2009, 01:35 PM
My mom used to support what I did when I lived with her. She always respected my computer time, back before I bought my own. Back in 2003 I gave her a single chapter of what is now a defunct version of a story I have only just now started to rewrite (With loads more success, I might add) She told me it was too young for her. (Which should've been a clue as to what genre I should write. Took me five years to figure it out.)

She hasn't read a single thing I've written since. And I don't think she ever will, save for the first chapter of the story I'm editing. Now that I live 300 miles away from her, her first question when I call is "Are you going to work at that grocery store the rest of your life?"

"No, mom. I'm a writer. I'm going to pay the bills like this. I just need a few more years."

"Oh."

So I'm sending her an email containing the first chapter of "In the Time of Angels" including all the cursing, swearing, blood, decapitations and horror-like elements therein to remind her once and for all that this is what I'm doing with the rest of my life. She's a huge Stephen King fan, so she shouldn't have too much trouble with it. I'm just afraid it's going to shatter her preconceived notions her sweet little boy, once I show her what a twisted wreck of a human being I can be. Muh ha ha!

Angel_Lorena26
02-14-2009, 10:37 PM
I would never involved my mother in my writing then as a teenager and now as a adult mainly because her attitude has always been the same she'd never showed any interest/ support in my writing. I have tried talking to her about it but at the end it was just a waste of time. So I gave up I do this on my own and rely on my own enthusiam to get my through my writing.

Travis J. Smith
02-15-2009, 12:46 AM
My parents are fairly conservative (read: not very LGBT friendly)--and although they know my work is always fiction, I'm afraid they'll see me in a different light.My parents fail to understand that a personís writing, whether it be fiction or nonfiction, is not always telling of a person. In one of the few instances where I had my parents read a story of mine, a quote I used snagged them up significantly. The quote was of a line from the lyrics of an album named This Godless Endeavor, and my motherís side of the family is particularly religious, as is she, though weíve been unable to attend church for years. Naturally, she responded to it. Explaining that I did not share the lyricistís personal beliefs was pointless, because there was no getting through to her on that note; she acted as if, by quoting the man, I was aligning myself with both him and his beliefs. Since then, my parents havenít read a bit of my work, though embittered arguments have still arisen between me and my family regarding it.

Neither my parents nor my sister see the sense in profanity and other such un-pleasantries being included in a work of fiction. I tried to get them to realize itís little but a matter of realism, but my mother and my sister Mallory, in particular, are conservative tightwads in that respect, so I was fighting another losing battle.

However, I cannot say Iíve avoided involving my parents/family because of fear of being seen in a different light. I am not the least bit hesitant about clarifying my stances with my immediate family which are generally on the opposite end of the spectrum from them. Itís a matter of avoiding needless confrontation.


Then again, I'm a pretty private/introverted person. None of my friends know that I write, much less read it.This approach would be mine if I did not spend so much time writing. So much about me is my writing, so I am hesitantly extroverted when it comes to discussing my writing. I put myself out there, but Iím still introverted in a sense because I am very particular about who I let read my writing. Besides, Iím majoring in English with a Creative Writing emphasis, so distancing myself from the writer in me in any sense is a near impossibility.

Ugawa
02-15-2009, 01:41 AM
Everyone usually keeps to themselves in my family. My parents know I love to read, and they know I'm studying for an English degree, but they don't know I've written 3 novels and starting on a 4th.

It's funny actually. The other day my mum says to my dad, "She's going to end up writing a book herself one day." I was just like, "Nah." ... I'm not sure why I've never told them, it just hasn't come into conversation. I'm starting to wonder what they think I do in my room for hours on end. Whenever they walk in I always close word down.

Back to the point :D. You don't have to tell your parents everything. If you feel uncomfortable about them knowing, then keep this one more on the down low. If it does end up getting published, then it's too late for them to complain about it. Hehe.

XX

katiemac
02-15-2009, 02:02 AM
I've never told my parents, either. They read the short stories I wrote during elementary school, sure. But if I were to tell them, I wouldn't ever let them read something until it was published. So why bother until it is published, you know? I also don't give away plot details either, so it really would be me saying, "Hey, I'm working on a novel. Let's never talk about this again."

It's the same reasons my friends don't read anything or know I write. I'm just not interested in their opinions on it. I realize that sounds extremely harsh, but it's not the intent--I have finish the work and like the work and think it's worth other people seeing. I don't like preemptive "ooh, can I read it?" questions when the answer is always no and they're most likely being polite anyway.

Vorteil
02-15-2009, 02:05 AM
When I lived with my parents they always knew that I wrote, but I don't think they ever once wanted to see anything. My dad almost never reads, and although my mom was the one who got me into books she hardly reads anymore either. The rest of my relatives are far more interested, but they're fairly conservative and I don't let them read everything. I don't think it would make them see me any differently but they just wouldn't like it.

It would've been nice if my parents had been more supportive, but I seem to have found plenty of motivation on my own.

Empress_Isis
02-15-2009, 03:53 AM
Well, I moved out of home when I was 17, and as far as I know my parents never read anything I wrote (except my diary!). But they are both big readers of fantasy, which is what I mainly write, so I imagine they will definitely read anything that I have published.

I have thought about that when I've been writing, as there are some pretty full-on scenes in my work. I don't know how I feel about them reading that! But I'm certainly not going to let that stop me from writing what I want to write.

CrownedSun
02-15-2009, 07:32 AM
My grandmother (who I grew up with) is very supportive of my writing, very much wants to read everything, and has always kind of "shared the dream"; she's always been a storyteller and wanted to get published but never really put any effort into it. My grandfather is more generally supportive, offers to buy me writing programs to help me out and so forth. But, he's more of a, "Might read it when it gets published," type.

They talk about my writing in their letters to childhood friends and other members of the family and everything. It's kinda amusing and cute.


In terms of subject matter, I'll probably let my grandmother read the manuscript after I finish it all and get it printed up. There are a few racy bits here and there, but I'm 30 years old and I'm not hugely embarrassed about that stuff. When I was younger, though? I would have been mortified! http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-ashamed001.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

RunawayScribe
02-15-2009, 11:39 AM
I started writing as a younger teenager, living at home. My parents never read squat. I wrote a novel, a novella, several shorts, some scripts and enough poetry to sink a boat while living in their house. They didn't have a clue. They knew I read a lot, because I was always going to bookstores and dragging books around, but that's about it. I didn't lie about it - I just didn't advertise what I was doing. I doubt they'd have looked at me the same if they found out some of my subject matter...

cooeedownunder
02-16-2009, 12:43 AM
I have been writing since I was nine and my parents could not help but notice it and spent many times reading my stories. My grandmother brought me a typewriter when I was nine, which was an expensive excercise back then, and after she passed away I finally completed something worthy of being published, although far removed from the fiction I had spent so many years writing.

darkchild
02-17-2009, 04:16 AM
my mom doesn't know i've been writing for years. but my guardians are always in the stands cheering me on. that's how much they've been involved. and believe me, that's more than enough :)