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View Full Version : What rooms where on a BattleShip?



Scott Bryan
01-30-2009, 09:21 PM
Guys what sort of rooms where there on a battleship? Did they have computers back on?

gothicangel
01-30-2009, 09:28 PM
Please tell me this is a joke.

Scott Bryan
01-30-2009, 09:29 PM
Please tell me this is a joke.
no and before you say it the story is based in world war 2

alleycat
01-30-2009, 09:30 PM
They did not have computers. They did have some rather complex mechanical devices for aiming the guns as I recall.

dpaterso
01-30-2009, 09:31 PM
You might get more answers in our Story Research forum (which is where research questions should go). Moving the thread there.

-Derek

Robert Toy
01-30-2009, 09:32 PM
Typical layout

http://www.battleshipnc.com/history/bb55/layout/index.php

Duncan J Macdonald
01-30-2009, 09:56 PM
They did not have computers. They did have some rather complex mechanical devices for aiming the guns as I recall.
Well, technically, the Mark I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_I_Fire_Control_Computer) was a computer. It, and the later Mark I Able Fire Control Computer was the state of the art for the US Navy in WW II.

Sea Story: I was assigned to a reserve ship homeported in Long Beach CA, the same port where the USS NEW JERSEY was being brought out of mothballs during the late 1980's. She was outfitted with updated naval computer (electronic ones) systems, and went out to do some gun exercises with her 16 inch guns. Every one of the new electronic systems broke from the shock-wave generated by those guns. They had to fall-back to using the Mark I Able.

Sea Story 2: Later that same year, we were out on the gun range astern of the NEW JERSEY at roughly 4,000 yards. (just over 2 statute miles for you land lubbers), and all personnel on the weather decks on my ship were required to wear hearing protection when the NEW JERSEY opened fire.

IceCreamEmpress
01-30-2009, 09:58 PM
There were no computers, in the sense we understand them today, in 1939-1945, so they couldn't have been on a World War II battleship.

The first functional programmable computer was the ENIAC, which was completed in 1946. Both German and US inventors had made very rudimentary programmable computing machines in the 1930s and early 1940s, but they were not used outside of an experimental setting.

ENIAC was the size of a house (1,200 square feet) and weighed 50 tons, so even if it had been completed before the end of the war, it couldn't have fit on a battleship comfortably.

Of course there were computational devices--rangefinders, decoders, etc.--but those had very specialized applications. Think of them as working more like today's calculators than like today's computers.

Please read at least three books about World War II battleships before you waste your time coming up with plot points that aren't realistic--it will help you a lot.

Scott Bryan
01-30-2009, 09:58 PM
Well, technically, the Mark I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_I_Fire_Control_Computer) was a computer. It, and the later Mark I Able Fire Control Computer was the state of the art for the US Navy in WW II.

Sea Story: I was assigned to a reserve ship homeported in Long Beach CA, the same port where the USS NEW JERSEY was being brought out of mothballs during the late 1980's. She was outfitted with updated naval computer (electronic ones) systems, and went out to do some gun exercises with her 16 inch guns. Every one of the new electronic systems broke from the shock-wave generated by those guns. They had to fall-back to using the Mark I Able.

Sea Story 2: Later that same year, we were out on the gun range astern of the NEW JERSEY at roughly 4,000 yards. (just over 2 statute miles for you land lubbers), and all personnel on the weather decks on my ship were required to wear hearing protection when the NEW JERSEY opened fire.
Its ok now i've done a full page of Word if you want to read the beginning of the story just ask :)

alleycat
01-30-2009, 10:05 PM
Well, technically, the Mark I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_I_Fire_Control_Computer) was a computer. It, and the later Mark I Able Fire Control Computer was the state of the art for the US Navy in WW II.

Just to clarify, I was referring to any kind of true electronic computer, since I assumed this is what the OP was asking.

And slightly off-topic . . .

I once read a history on the development of the modern computer from the early mechanical devices to the advent of the first electronic computers. Quite interesting, and some of their mechanical "computers" was actually pretty amazing for the time.

cbenoi1
01-30-2009, 10:06 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iowa_class_battleship

There is a small filmography at the end. Maybe borrowing a few of those at your local library or video rentals can give you an idea of the interiors.

-cb

Duncan J Macdonald
01-30-2009, 10:15 PM
Its ok now i've done a full page of Word if you want to read the beginning of the story just ask :)
If you're looking for a critique, try the Share Your Work forum here at AW. Just be aware, however, that the critiques you'll get will be just that. If they think that something is wrong, or needs work, they will say that. Conversely, if they like something, they'll say that too. Don't take it personally.

Scott Bryan
01-30-2009, 10:34 PM
If you're looking for a critique, try the Share Your Work forum here at AW. Just be aware, however, that the critiques you'll get will be just that. If they think that something is wrong, or needs work, they will say that. Conversely, if they like something, they'll say that too. Don't take it personally.
Ok where abouts do you post it?

alleycat
01-30-2009, 11:22 PM
Ok where abouts do you post it?
There's a section of the forum called Share Your Work. Go to the main AW page and look about half-way down. It's a protected forum with a password.

The password is vista. After you get into the forum, find the most appropriate sub-forum to post your work. You might want to tell others what you're looking for in a critique; for example, an opinion of the storyline only, or a detail critique of what you've written so far. It helps if you try to make what you post the best you can before posting it in SYW, even though you're aware that it's not perfect yet.

HoraceJames
01-30-2009, 11:31 PM
The USS Alabama is an older WW2 vintage battleship. I visited a couple of times over the years, they have a 360 tour on their website but I don't know if it includes interior shots.

What I remember is that the inside spaces and rooms are very small -- space very much at a premium. Later b-ships like the Missouri were bigger.

Scott Bryan
01-30-2009, 11:35 PM
There's a section of the forum called Share Your Work. Go to the main AW page and look about half-way down. It's a protected forum with a password.

The password is vista. After you get into the forum, find the most appropriate sub-forum to post your work. You might want to tell others what you're looking for in a critique; for example, an opinion of the storyline only, or a detail critique of what you've written so far. It helps if you try to make what you post the best you can before posting it in SYW, even though you're aware that it's not perfect yet.
the whole thing is there take a look if you want.

Sarpedon
01-30-2009, 11:55 PM
A world war 2 battleship would have around 2,000 or more men on board. So it would have everything you'd expect a small town to have; infirmary, store, mess hall, laundries, recreation areas, meeting rooms, bunkrooms, chapel, offices, various craft shops, etc in addition to its warlike areas; fire control centers, radio shack, (yes, the store is named after a thing found on warships) main bridge, engine room (remember, in WW2 there were still some steam-powered coal fired battleships in service, so descriptions may vary) munition magazines, gun turrets, a very complicated system to get the amunition to the turrets from the magazine safely, shell storage (the shells and ammunition stored separately), separate storage locker for every type of equipment and ammunition, access crawlspaces, tanks for fuel (or bunkers for coal), lubrication oil, fresh water (both potable and non potable), etc. Many WW2 battleships also carried seaplanes, so there'd be a hanger, a catapult for launching, a crane for recovering, and a variety of storage and shops for them, separate from other uses.

Sarpedon
01-31-2009, 12:07 AM
Not to mention the various food storage rooms, refrigerator rooms, freezer rooms, dry foodstuff storage rooms, etc etc, and galleys.

James D. Macdonald
01-31-2009, 05:13 AM
There are a number of places where you can visit battleships. Battleship Cove (http://www.battleshipcove.org/) in Fall River, MA, (home of USS Massachusetts) is just one of them.