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Unique
05-23-2005, 09:01 AM
There. A new unusual word. Torin, this one's for you. No particular reason - I just hated to see your last post go lonely.

(P.S. Also, it's safe down here where no one will look. No pheromone laden hankies, no sticky floors, no bundles of fur unattached to their original owners - a safe haven, so to speak)

Now, break out your big 20'#ers - or go online. Anyone care to hazard a guess without peeking?

arrowqueen
05-23-2005, 02:53 PM
Sounds like some medieval right, like tillage and soccage.

The right to burn old bits of bark left over from deer sharpening their antlers?

MacAllister
05-23-2005, 03:12 PM
ooh! Good definition, AQ. I thought it sounded vaguely medieval and Catholic.

Torin
05-23-2005, 05:33 PM
Haven't a clue on my own (but we already knew that, didn't we? :) ) My Compact Oxford gives the definition, but I won't ruin anyone's fun just yet. Good word. I wonder if I can put it into use this summer when the tourists come.

Torin

mreddin
05-23-2005, 08:53 PM
SHROFFAGE

Oh that one is easy! Here is an example...

Country just din' the same since women got into that there darn shroffage movement. ;)

Mike

robeiae
05-24-2005, 01:04 AM
If you want to stay regular, don't eat too much shroffage...

arrowqueen
05-27-2005, 02:46 AM
Okay. Nosiness forced me to look it up. All I could find was a 'Shroff' which is either a money-lender/a person who tests for duff coinage - so presumabaly 'shroffage' is money-lending/testing dodgy coinage.

Yes/No/Maybe?

MacAllister
05-27-2005, 03:22 AM
from dictionary.com :


'shroffage'

Shroffage \Shroff"age\, n. The examination of coins, and the separation of the good from the debased. [East Indies]


Source (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=00-database-info&db=web1913): Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


'shroffage'

Shroffage \Shroff"age\, n. A money dealer's commission; also, more commonly, the examination of coins, and the separation of the good from the debased.

arrowqueen
05-27-2005, 03:30 AM
I still prefer my version.

Unique
05-27-2005, 03:53 AM
by MacAllister

'shroffage'

Shroffage \Shroff"age\, n. A money dealer's commission;

That's it. Your turn. <grin>




What can I say? I'm one of those 'strange' people who will read a dictionary for fun. Better than some habits I could have.....

MacAllister
05-27-2005, 04:48 AM
Unique--I completely understand. A few years ago I bought a great big multi-edition OED. I've lugged those things around through I dunno how many moves. I love 'em. :D

okay, how about oneiric

arrowqueen
05-27-2005, 04:49 AM
'Bibulous'?

Unique
05-27-2005, 05:12 AM
Unique--I completely understand. A few years ago I bought a great big multi-edition OED. I've lugged those things around through I dunno how many moves. I love 'em. :D

okay, how about oneiric

ummm....an abbreviation for one eyed rick? nah, let me ponder it.
and bibulous...is that like fabulous, only smaller? I'd better ponder that one, too.
good words!

MacAllister
05-27-2005, 07:47 AM
"Bibulous" err...Bible-caused indigestion?

arrowqueen
05-28-2005, 03:27 AM
Lol, Mac. Nice definition.

Oh, and I actually know oneiric, but I shan't tell and spoil other folk's fun.

robeiae
05-28-2005, 06:21 AM
Unique--I completely understand. A few years ago I bought a great big multi-edition OED. I've lugged those things around through I dunno how many moves. I love 'em.

Ditto. I even bought a rather expensive dictionary stand to put them and other reference materials on. Put it in the formal living room, despite the protests from my better half. I send my seven-year-old there to look up any word she doesn't know. I've got the crazy idea this will get her into Harvard!

Rob :)

Unique
06-02-2005, 03:52 PM
Ditto. I even bought a rather expensive dictionary stand to put them and other reference materials on. Put it in the formal living room, despite the protests from my better half. I send my seven-year-old there to look up any word she doesn't know. I've got the crazy idea this will get her into Harvard!

Rob :)

I've wanted a dictionary stand for years & years - maybe this year will be the year to get one. A few boards, a few nails, a little glue - a broken foot when the darn thing collapses on me...Can you imagine, Rob - - I'm jealous of your piece of furniture....Is anyone going to post the definition of our last words? I've found a new one while looking up the definition of fun. (It's been so long since I've had any, I had to look it up to remember what it was.)

FUTTOCK - the 'F' is not a typo.
I love words.....

arrowqueen
06-03-2005, 01:57 AM
'Bibulous' means 'having a tendency to drink too much' and 'oneiric' means 'pertaining to dreams.' (I think.)

MacAllister
06-05-2005, 05:33 AM
Indeed it does, AQ--so it's to you again.

arrowqueen
06-07-2005, 02:09 AM
Caryatid

mreddin
06-07-2005, 03:03 AM
Caryatid

"Mom! Caryatid again!"

That's a tough one, I can't even pick out a root to start from.

reph
06-07-2005, 08:17 AM
Caryatid. Think art history.

Unique
06-07-2005, 03:18 PM
Shoot! I was thinking crickets. Or mantises. Grasshoppers, at least.

And what's worse - I've looked that word up in the dictionary before - hmph. Time for some mental housekeeping, obviously. Things are getting lost up there.

MacAllister
06-07-2005, 04:21 PM
ooh! excellent word, AQ!

robeiae
06-08-2005, 03:24 AM
caryatid...

Isn't that what Indiana Jones pushed on to find the secret passage in Temple of Doom? (a naked chick holding up the roof)

Rob :)

MacAllister
06-08-2005, 04:45 AM
That's exactly what it is, Rob--a supporting column shaped like a person. :)

That means it's YOUR turn to come up with a word...

robeiae
06-08-2005, 05:17 AM
Okay:

garderobe

Rob :)

arrowqueen
06-09-2005, 01:55 AM
I know that one from all the historical stuff, so I'll bow out.

robeiae
06-09-2005, 03:26 AM
You don't have one, do you Arrowqueen?

Rob :)

Unique
06-09-2005, 03:35 AM
Okay:

garderobe

Rob :)

What I wear outside to work in the yard.

Oh, that doesn't say - gardenrobe, does it?
Oh, bother. I'll have to look that one up. fssssss

arrowqueen
06-10-2005, 04:28 AM
Nope, Rob. We got plumbing.

robeiae
06-10-2005, 04:30 AM
Nope, Rob. We got plumbing.
Now you've about given it away; I suppose you know what a "gong farmer" is, as well. Can we add it for extra credit?

Rob :)

arrowqueen
06-11-2005, 03:55 AM
I believe the term across here is 'Night soil man'

reph
06-11-2005, 11:06 AM
A garderobe is a clothes closet. That's one meaning, anyway.

robeiae
06-11-2005, 06:24 PM
A garderobe is a clothes closet. That's one meaning, anyway.
Hmmm...I've never heard that meaning, but I'll take your word for it. I know I wouldn't ever put my clothes in one!

Rob :)

reph
06-12-2005, 02:09 AM
It's like "wardrobe." Middle English: "warderobe," a place to guard (= protect, keep) robes.

arrowqueen
06-12-2005, 03:20 AM
Yes, but it was originally the rudimentary toilet in a castle. (Basically a hole that led out through the castle wall.)

Clothes were stored there (particularly furs) because the stench kept off the moths - hence it eventually came to have our modern meaning.

Aren't you glad I told you?

arrowqueen
06-12-2005, 03:23 AM
Reph can post the next one though, since I have a kind and generous heart. (and I did point out that I knew already.)

reph
06-12-2005, 08:15 AM
My American dictionaries don't give all that history about "garderobe." Fascinating, if yucky.

Sannup.

arrowqueen
06-13-2005, 01:26 AM
Sounds like a health drink to me.

'I'll have some cod-liver-oil capsules and a bottle of Sannup, please.'

robeiae
06-14-2005, 08:12 AM
Actually, I had a gym teacher who used it all the time:

"Kay, ev'one 'sannup!" trans="okay, everyone listen up!"

Hmmm...sannup...hmmm

holy something? No... maybe nup-?

Wedding vows??

Rob :)

robeiae
06-14-2005, 08:14 AM
Oh, BTW, if anyone was curious, a "gong farmer" is the guy who gets to clean out the garderobe!!

Rob :)

arrowqueen
06-15-2005, 02:02 AM
You might be right, Rob, It does have a vaguely religious feel to it. A Sikh/Hindu priest or summat?

arrowqueen
07-04-2005, 01:56 AM
Ok. I give in - what exactly is a 'sannup'?

reph
07-04-2005, 03:40 AM
(American Heritage Dict.) "A married male American Indian. [From a Massachusetts word akin to Eastern Abnaki sénape, 'man.']"

reph
07-04-2005, 10:34 PM
I've been reminded that it's my turn again.

An archaic word that I'd like to see revived: "fugle." It's a verb. Happy guessing!

MacAllister
07-04-2005, 11:28 PM
Hah! Instead of filibustering, our honorable Senators can fugle one another to a standstill...

arrowqueen
07-05-2005, 01:07 AM
Isn't that illegal in most states?

robeiae
07-05-2005, 01:46 AM
It's misspelled: should be fugly

Rob :)

robeiae
07-05-2005, 06:03 AM
Okay, seriously:

fugle: bear fruit?

I got the idea from something Shakesperean that's at the corner of my brain...
Rob :)

Unique
07-05-2005, 06:14 AM
I've been reminded that it's my turn again.

An archaic word that I'd like to see revived: "fugle." It's a verb. Happy guessing!

Is that a short 'u' fugle like bug; or a long 'u' fugle like bugle?

reph
07-05-2005, 08:05 AM
Long "u."

robeiae
07-05-2005, 04:26 PM
Okay, seriously:

fugle: bear fruit?

I got the idea from something Shakesperean that's at the corner of my brain...
Rob :)

I take it this was incorrect?

Rob :)

reph
07-05-2005, 10:45 PM
I take it this was incorrect?
I missed your previous post because the page broke just below it and I checked in when another page had started.

"Bear fruit" is incorrect.

The sentence Mac used the word in would work.

MacAllister
07-05-2005, 10:55 PM
:D I remember running across the word when I was looking for the word for the little flags that the signal-corps guys use...

Unique
07-06-2005, 12:01 AM
I thought it meant prevaricate, or equivocate, or postulate for a stretch. Can I look it up now?

robeiae
07-06-2005, 12:34 AM
:D I remember running across the word when I was looking for the word for the little flags that the signal-corps guys use...

I get it...German origin, from flugen (to fly), so fugle is to wave a flag, right?

Rob :)

MacAllister
07-06-2005, 12:39 AM
sort of--you got the root right, for sure...it has sort of political, non-literal connotations, too:
fu·gle http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/JPG/pron.jpg (https://secure.reference.com/premium/login.html?rd=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fdictionary.reference.com%2Fsearch%3 Fq%3Dfugle) ( P ) Pronunciation Key (http://dictionary.reference.com/help/ahd4/pronkey.html) (fyhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/oomacr.gifhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifghttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/schwa.gifl)
intr.v. Archaic fu·gled, fu·gling, fu·gles

To act as a fugleman.
To make signals.

back formed from "fugleman":

fu·gle·man http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/JPG/pron.jpg (https://secure.reference.com/premium/login.html?rd=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fdictionary.reference.com%2Fsearch%3 Fq%3Dfugleman) ( P ) Pronunciation Key (http://dictionary.reference.com/help/ahd4/pronkey.html) (fyhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/oomacr.gifhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifghttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/schwa.gifl-mhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/schwa.gifn)
n.

A leader, especially a political leader.
Archaic. A soldier who once served as a guide and model for his company.

[Alteration of German Flügelmann, file leader : Flügel, wing (from Middle High German vlügel. See pleu- in Indo-European Roots) + Mann, man (from Middle High German man, from Old High German. See man-1 in Indo-European Roots).]
(this definition from dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=fugle) is pretty imperfect, and not _quite_ what I remembered, but it's close and easily citeable. :) )

reph
07-06-2005, 12:45 AM
Mac wins the round.

Next word, Mac?

MacAllister
07-06-2005, 01:14 AM
Ah! I was waiting to see if you came back with a better definition than mine, Reph. :)

How about "hegira"

reph
07-06-2005, 03:08 AM
Hegira. Obs. An herbal mixture used by medieval sultans before visiting the harem. [From "he," a male, + "gira," anagram of several letters in "Viagra."]

MacAllister
07-06-2005, 03:14 AM
Hegira. Obs. An herbal mixture used by medieval sultans before visiting the harem. [From "he," a male, + "gira," anagram of several letters in "Viagra."]
:ROFL: oh! That's soooooo much better than the real definition!

screenwriter
07-06-2005, 07:04 PM
There. A new unusual word. Torin, this one's for you. No particular reason - I just hated to see your last post go lonely.

(P.S. Also, it's safe down here where no one will look. No pheromone laden hankies, no sticky floors, no bundles of fur unattached to their original owners - a safe haven, so to speak)

Now, break out your big 20'#ers - or go online. Anyone care to hazard a guess without peeking?

Shroffage (N) : A grayish leafy vegetable, eaten mainly in medieval times by serfs. "Ma Ma, is there any more steamed shroffage?"

Unique
07-06-2005, 07:07 PM
Shroffage (N) : A grayish leafy vegetable, eaten mainly in medieval times by serfs. "Ma Ma, is there any more steamed shroffage?"

and what a fine young cannibal that would make you....

robeiae
07-06-2005, 09:44 PM
Hegira--you capitalized it Mac, and that gives it away (I think it actually has to be capitalized)

Mohammed's flight from Mecca(?), or was it Medina(?); Mecca, I think. Now it can be any religious journey, though usually Muslim (in the same way a Crusade is properly Christian).

Rob :flag: (I'm a fugleman)

MacAllister
07-06-2005, 09:46 PM
points to Rob for that round...

Your word, then, Rob. :)

robeiae
07-06-2005, 10:03 PM
How 'bout this:

novus homo (need specific context, not just literal meaning)

Rob :)

screenwriter
07-08-2005, 01:57 AM
Novus Homo (n) Proper : 1) German automobile with a sprockets-powered engine.

arrowqueen
07-08-2005, 02:42 AM
'New Man' - eats quiche, cooks, knows about herbs, uses deodorant.

Unique
07-08-2005, 02:52 AM
New Man - crawled up out of the muck and shook Darwin's hand.

robeiae
07-08-2005, 09:38 PM
Yes, "new man" is right, but the context? Hint: who used Latin first?

Rob :)

MacAllister
07-08-2005, 09:42 PM
Hmmm--so it's sort of like Cicero's metrosexual...

Unique
07-08-2005, 10:10 PM
Yes, "new man" is right, but the context? Hint: who used Latin first?

Rob :)

I did.

arrowqueen
07-09-2005, 03:36 AM
A Roman boy who's just gone through his rite of passage to manhood?

robeiae
07-09-2005, 11:00 PM
A Roman boy who's just gone through his rite of passage to manhood?
Good thought, but incorrect; you're in the right place, though.

Rob :)

arrowqueen
07-11-2005, 02:00 AM
Newly elected senator?

robeiae
07-11-2005, 02:56 AM
Newly elected senator?
Correct (more or less)! A novus homo was someone who was the first in his family to reach the Senate. Alot like a newbie, I suppose.

Your turn AQ.

Rob :)

arrowqueen
07-14-2005, 02:15 AM
Chatoyant.

Pthom
07-14-2005, 02:48 AM
Chatoyant.(n.) a person who spends an inordinant amount of time in the AW chat room, waiting for the forums to come back up, and while there, prognosticating on the possiblity that it was his (her) fault.

reph
07-14-2005, 04:44 AM
Chatoyant. (n.) One who teaches Yiddish to cats. [From F. chat, cat, + oy, interj.]

robeiae
07-14-2005, 04:46 AM
For some reason, this word makes me think of Zsa Zsa Gabor...

Rob :)

arrowqueen
07-16-2005, 03:08 AM
Some of her possessions, certainly.

robeiae
07-16-2005, 06:48 AM
Ahhh...jewelry related. Well, that helps me about zero percent. The only thing I can think of that might have a relationship to an obscure word like this is the clarity of a diamond, but I know that's not right, is it?? (praying feverishly)

Rob :(

MacAllister
07-16-2005, 10:44 AM
errr...ostentatiously chatty?

reph
07-16-2005, 11:33 AM
Furry? The word sounds French, with its "-ant" ending. "Chat" is Fr. for cat. Cats are furry. Zsa Zsa had fur coats, I bet.

robeiae
07-16-2005, 04:43 PM
Furry? The word sounds French, with its "-ant" ending. "Chat" is Fr. for cat. Cats are furry. Zsa Zsa had fur coats, I bet.
Now you know Zsa Zsa wouldn't be caught dead in a coat made of cat fur! Dahling, that would be so not chic!!

Rob :)

arrowqueen
07-17-2005, 02:30 AM
Very close indeed, rob. Not quite though.

reph
07-17-2005, 05:27 AM
Does it mean sounding like a cat, having catlike eyes, acting kittenish, or something of the sort?

MacAllister
07-23-2005, 07:00 AM
Okay--I couldn't stand it, so I looked it up.

Also, AQ is briefly away from us--so the answer wasn't going to be forthcoming.

Reph, you're very close with "cat's-eyes"...I'm impressed. :)

reph
07-23-2005, 10:53 AM
I looked it up too. I figured if I was very close, further guessing wouldn't get me any closer. So I'm out of this round.

robeiae
07-24-2005, 04:31 AM
So who, exactly, is left besides me? According to AQ and Mac, the word is wrapped up in something close to the clarity of a diamond and to cat's-eyes. Is there some type of diamond known as a cat's eye? Is that what a Chatoyant is?
Doesn't sound right...

Rob :)

reph
07-24-2005, 04:50 AM
Well, Mac, are we going to make Rob reconstruct the exact dictionary definition before we declare him the winner? That doesn't sound right, either.

MacAllister
07-24-2005, 05:38 AM
Okay--we'll call Rob the winner. :) Since reph and I caved under curiousity.

Rob, indeed, chatoyant means changeable luster, such as on a cat's eye or a shimmery sort of quality

robeiae
07-24-2005, 06:19 AM
Okay--we'll call Rob the winner. :) Since reph and I caved under curiousity.

Rob, indeed, chatoyant means changeable luster, such as on a cat's eye or a shimmery sort of quality
Oh, of course...I was just about to say exactly that. :ROFL:
That would mean it's my turn, but I have to skip it or you have to wait. I'm leaving Monday for vaction and I'm not bringing my laptop (yes, some of us can actually do that!!). So continue on without me or wait til August for my word!!

Rob :)

reph
07-24-2005, 09:13 AM
The American Heritage Dict. says:

adj. Having a changeable luster.
n. A chatoyant stone or gemstone, such as the cat's-eye.
[French, present participle of chatoyer, gleam like a cat's eyes, from chat, cat....]

I'll throw a word into the ring: hircine

Unique
07-24-2005, 04:18 PM
:eek: >Ack< reph!

I know porcine
and
I know hirsute

Can I put them together and make 'hairy pig' ?

MacAllister
07-24-2005, 10:21 PM
Now see, I had the same immediate association that Unique had: hirsute, porcine=hircine, which would then mean something like "resembling hair"...

On the other hand, I'm having a sudden memory nudge that "hircus" is Latin for "goat"

So hircine could be "goat-like," too.

reph
07-24-2005, 10:26 PM
Keep trying.

MacAllister
07-24-2005, 10:27 PM
ah! Reph was responding and I was editing. :)

Back to the drawing board!

Unique
07-24-2005, 10:40 PM
Yeah. And the way she said it makes me feel like we're no where close....

Rats! Who started this game, anyway? LOL

loquax
07-25-2005, 02:28 AM
Anything that ends in "ine" normally means an animal resemblence, e.g. canine=dog, feline=cat, lupine=wolf, ursine=bear, asinine=***, leporine=rabbit, vulpine=fox... and that's all I can remember off the top of me 'ed.

reph
07-25-2005, 02:38 AM
Goatlike is correct – goatlike, especially, in odor or lustfulness. (Combine those two and you get a lot of frustration.)

Over to you, Mac.

MacAllister
07-31-2005, 12:50 AM
oops! dropped the ball, sorry. :)

how about:

laciniate

robeiae
08-01-2005, 03:51 AM
laciniate...looks Greek to me.

Rob :) (who has a hircine hair-cut)

MacAllister
08-01-2005, 04:26 PM
Latin, actually.

reph
08-02-2005, 08:49 AM
I have no idea about "laciniate" except that it looks like one of those words botanists use for leaf shapes.

MacAllister
08-02-2005, 11:20 AM
Reph--you nailed it, it IS one of those words. :) It means "fringed or fringe-like"

Over to you!

reph
08-02-2005, 10:44 PM
I'll pass. (Fakes right, fakes left, PASSES...) Rob deferred a turn because he was traveling.

Rob?

robeiae
08-03-2005, 03:23 AM
Okay, how about:

catamite

Rob :)

reph
08-03-2005, 04:32 AM
I'm ineligible for this round. I know the word.

robeiae
08-03-2005, 05:39 AM
I'm ineligible for this round. I know the word.
For some reason, I thought you might...I'm afraid Mac might, too.

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-03-2005, 10:20 AM
yep--try again. :D

reph
08-03-2005, 12:03 PM
Are there only three players, then?

MacAllister
08-03-2005, 12:49 PM
Reph, I believe so, unless Unique or ArrowQueen wants to check in--but I'd bet they know the word, too.

Unique
08-03-2005, 03:28 PM
"Unique is temporarily suspended between hell and high water. Please leave a message after the tone." >BEEP<

robeiae
08-03-2005, 10:26 PM
You know, it was hircine that mad me think of catamite:

a pederast's pink-cheeked boy. (A Browser's Dictionary)

Lemme think..................

droshky

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-04-2005, 10:59 PM
droshky: errr--russian/american slang for overindulging in spirits?

reph
08-05-2005, 03:48 AM
1950s term for a bucket you put on the floor to catch drips because, under the Communist economic system, your roof leaks and Comrade Ceilinkopatchsky hasn't answered your calls?

robeiae
08-05-2005, 04:48 AM
You guys have your geography right.

Rob :)

Sarita
08-05-2005, 05:01 AM
I'm going to say it's a Polish word (being Polish might be good for more than the jokes...) But, what does it mean? hmmm, I'm not commiting beyond thinking it's a noun.

MacAllister
08-05-2005, 05:04 AM
I've been tossing this around in my head most of the day. :) It does have that Russian or Polish sound, doesn't it. heh.

I keep wondering if the word has roots in common with "dray"--which is a heavy-duty work wagon. Hmmmmmm

Sarita
08-05-2005, 05:15 AM
Ha! And I was thinking it had something to do with a bike. (connection... wheels)

MacAllister
08-09-2005, 04:48 PM
So has Rob gone off on vacation again? Is he ever going to come back and give us the definition?

robeiae
08-09-2005, 06:24 PM
You didn't say "uncle" yet.

Rob :)

reph
08-09-2005, 09:40 PM
Rob, I think we're all stumped.

Unique
08-09-2005, 10:24 PM
droshky - the name of the sandwich deli before Schlotzsky bought them out....

robeiae
08-10-2005, 07:00 PM
:) It does have that Russian or Polish sound, doesn't it. heh.

I keep wondering if the word has roots in common with "dray"--which is a heavy-duty work wagon. Hmmmmmm
Somehow, I missed this...sorry Mac. You were close:

droshky (n.) a light, four wheeled open carriage in which passengers sit sideways on a long, narrow bench, used mainly in Russia.

I'd say it's Mac's turn.

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-10-2005, 07:52 PM
Hmm. Do you have an etymology for the word, Rob? Now I'm awfully curious.

Here's a new one, meanwhile:

shibboleth

robeiae
08-10-2005, 09:02 PM
Hmm. Do you have an etymology for the word, Rob? Now I'm awfully curious.
No, I really don't. My dictionary suggests it is derived from drogi, which referred to the bar under a wagon joining the front and rear axles.

On shibboleth: I'm out, already know it.

Rob :)

reph
08-10-2005, 10:07 PM
Shibboleth? Come on, Mac. You underestimate us.

Sarita
08-10-2005, 10:15 PM
On shibboleth: I'm out, already know it. Yeah, me too.

MacAllister
08-11-2005, 04:46 AM
Ah well, I worried you might. It was one of those words stuck in my head that tasted particularly good, just then.

Okay, how about: saprostomous

reph
08-11-2005, 05:07 AM
Saprostomous. Something about digestion. Umm, does it describe creatures that get their nourishment by sucking up liquids?

robeiae
08-11-2005, 09:07 PM
Saprostomous-characteristics of young trees?

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-11-2005, 11:04 PM
heh heh--nope. Reph is closer than Rob, though...although it's still a bit of a stretch

Unique
08-12-2005, 01:09 AM
stoma..rings a bell...(faintly) sapro...why does this remind me of dead? maybe I'm thinking of saphro...

dead mouth...nah. bad breath from eating dead stuff? nah.

micro, micro.... Dr. F. would kill me. (don't tell her, OK?) I should know this.

Okay, I give.

reph
08-12-2005, 06:11 AM
"Stoma": something about the GI tract: stomach, colostomy. Stomata are the "breathing pores" on plant leaves. "Sapro" = sap? Probably not. Uhh.

Wait. Isn't a saprophyte a certain kind of plant? A plant that lives on dead matter? A moss or lichen? Something, something.

Let's go back to "shibboleth" and all pretend we've never seen it before.

MacAllister
08-12-2005, 11:40 AM
Unique nailed it! WTG, and that makes it Unique's turn...

saprostomous
adj. - having foul breath.

Unique
08-12-2005, 09:39 PM
Shibboleth rolled around in my mouth so nicely, I thought I'd find another 'sh' word.


shoad


it's not a variant of anything - it's its own word

robeiae
08-12-2005, 11:19 PM
shoad
Yo shoad nuff gots a rite good word dare...

Rob :)

Unique
08-13-2005, 12:30 AM
When it's my turn, I try to find words that are unique, yet not impossible.

reph
08-13-2005, 01:04 AM
Well, what happened this time? That one's impossible!

MacAllister
08-13-2005, 02:31 PM
urm...an archaic term for a neutered alpaca?

heh--I can't find any sort of etymological way into this word at all. If I had to guess, I suppose I'd go with Anglo-Saxon or Germanic origins...

Unique
08-13-2005, 04:56 PM
I thought a one syllable word would make it easier. :confused:

You know, 'oa' like boat
'sh' like.....'sh'
&
a 'd'.

You guys know 'shoal' and 'shoat'. >poof< that's what I get for thinking. Here's a clue:

if you were a miner 49'er, you might have this word in your vocabulary.



:::see how much faith I have in your literary prowess? i thought ya'll'd know this:::

reph
08-14-2005, 09:14 AM
Shoad. Umm...a short-handled shovel for use in tight spaces, like underground, like in a mine?

Unique
08-14-2005, 06:24 PM
closer, reph. It's a noun, but not something you can pick up with your hands. (At least not all at once.)

robeiae
08-14-2005, 07:56 PM
How 'bout a load of shale? (you know, a ton of ore)

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-14-2005, 08:00 PM
hmmm--a specific grade of ore?

Unique
08-14-2005, 09:18 PM
How 'bout a load of shale? (you know, a ton of ore)

Rob :)

hee hee, Rob. I can read between your lines.

Ya'll are all getting closer - let me know when you're ready for the 'official' version from the big 20#'er.

(I'm becoming rather fond of this word - I'm pondering a way to bring it into a more 'mainstream' useage.)

reph
08-14-2005, 09:57 PM
This is turning into something closer to Twenty Questions.

The rock left over after ore extraction? "Ain't nothin' worth diggin' for in there, Jake – it's just a heap o' shoad."

MacAllister
08-14-2005, 10:50 PM
uncle.

But I wanna know where the word comes from, too--my OED is all safely packed away in storage while I work on remodeling the house.

Sarita
08-15-2005, 02:07 AM
if you were a miner 49'er, you might have this word in your vocabulary. mmm... and as an archaeological science minor, I can't throw my 2 cents in...

(am I allowed to give hints like that, if it's not my word?)

MacAllister
08-15-2005, 02:17 AM
Sara, if you know the word, you're TOTALLY allowed to answer...that's the point. :)

So tell us, already! (Of course, then it's your turn to try and stump us, too)

Unique
08-15-2005, 02:24 AM
Go ahead, Sara! This game's for anyone. I'm going to post the answer after dinner, so feel free -

Sarita
08-15-2005, 02:26 AM
Oh, see... I thought if I knew it for sure, I couldn't answer... but if I had an idea about what the word could be...

Okay, I know the word or at least I think I do. The meaning I know has to do with sediment from rivers, rain or wind, leaving tracks to minerals in the ground. Geologists use shoad to find new mines. I can't remember if it only refers to iron ore or if it's an all inclusive term...

Unique
08-15-2005, 03:59 AM
shoad - n [origin unknown] dial Eng : a fragment of vein material removed by natural agencies from an outcrop and lying in the surface soil or debris

according to: Webster's Third New International Dictionary unabridged copyright 1981.

oof! I think Sara won this round. What do ya'll think?

robeiae
08-15-2005, 04:04 AM
Shoad 'nuff looks so to me!!

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-15-2005, 04:45 AM
Yepper--Sara's serve, then.

reph
08-15-2005, 08:34 AM
Oh, see... I thought if I knew it for sure, I couldn't answer... but if I had an idea about what the word could be...
That's the way I thought it went, too.

MacAllister
08-15-2005, 11:47 AM
Mostly I was getting desperate for a definition. I don't know as we've actually ever spelled out rules? We've sort of been playing it by ear as we go along, I thought...

If I messed up, I'm sorry. :kiss:

Unique
08-15-2005, 05:00 PM
It seems like this game just sort of 'evolved'. It's been fun for me. Mostly I've noticed if two or more people knew the answer straight off, they said, 'Too easy! Try another word.'

If you think we should hammer out 'rules', we can. Like how many days a word stays up, etc. (The funny guesses are a hoot. We should keep that part. :) )

reph
08-15-2005, 10:33 PM
I entered late, when the game was already going. My idea that you withdraw from a round if you know the word comes only from seeing it happen.

MacAllister
08-16-2005, 12:13 AM
right then! My interpretation was rather like Unique's, if a word is too easy, we call it.

So--Sara--it's to you! New word, please. :)

robeiae
08-16-2005, 02:40 AM
Now, Sara. :)

Rob :)

ETA: P.S. No Frenchy-type words, if you please ;) !

Sarita
08-17-2005, 12:41 AM
Okay... Sorry I went MIA. I'm in Allentown for work (yeah, I know I quit, but I'm a sucker, remember?) and I have a cold.

My word is:

Afreet.

Too easy?

reph
08-17-2005, 03:50 AM
Afreet. Dialectal variant of "afraid"?

Unique
08-17-2005, 04:11 AM
Afreet, Afront, Hasenpfeffer corporated (or whatever those two women were actually saying.) I could only understand Squiggy.

arrowqueen
08-17-2005, 03:40 PM
Is it a bogle? (trans: - ghostie/ghoulie/thing that goes bump in the night.)

robeiae
08-17-2005, 05:34 PM
Yah...makes me think of Efreeti, like a Djinn; is it the same word w/different spellling?

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-17-2005, 05:55 PM
ooh! I think Rob and AQ are on the right track--it's jogging something in the dusty archives of my memory...

Now where DID I put that word for safe-keeping...

Sarita
08-18-2005, 07:21 PM
Oh Yay!!! Rob and AQ got it :) It's a demon in ancient Arabian mythology, often called a Djinn or jinni today.

Now, who gets a go? The Queen or the Anti-Francophile

MacAllister
08-19-2005, 03:05 PM
Hmm--AQ weighed in first.

I'd settle for whoever comes back quickest, though.

arrowqueen
08-19-2005, 03:31 PM
Thanks to the time difference and the fact that rob is probably still in bed, I'm going. So there!

geas.

MacAllister
08-19-2005, 04:02 PM
ooh--gonna have to be a tougher word than that, AQ...

robeiae
08-19-2005, 05:35 PM
Okay, I'll go:

geas

Rob :)

reph
08-19-2005, 10:35 PM
ooh--gonna have to be a tougher word than that, AQ...
Not for me, it won't.

Geas. Umm, umm, uhh, OOF! A style of lace used in collars worn by medieval women of high rank?

Unique
08-20-2005, 12:22 AM
German chia pets.

robeiae
08-22-2005, 07:36 PM
geas: a mystical journey/experience?

Rob :)

MacAllister
08-23-2005, 07:33 AM
Wow--I didn't realize how obscure the word is, really--I _think_ it's a sort of spell; a magical compulsion to behave a certain way, should the circumstances meet specific parameters defined in the spell...

(at least that's how I've heard it used. :) )

arrowqueen
08-23-2005, 02:15 PM
Close enough Mac. You can have a geas laid upon you or you can pledge yourself to one.

Either way you're not allowed to go to down the pub/pick up fanciable ,members of the opposite sex/have a life of your own - until you have fulfilled whatever it is you've sworn yourself to/had laid upon you. (This usually involves finding big, glittery, mystical objects/fighting things with lots of teeth/traipsing to the ends of the earth. etc.)

MacAllister
08-23-2005, 10:03 PM
Okey dokey, then!

How about:

rantallion

Sarita
08-23-2005, 11:42 PM
rantallion: a long, angry tirade... in Italian. hehe

Okay, my real 2 cents is that I remember it being something dirty. No idea what... but something I wouldn't say in front of my mother..

robeiae
08-24-2005, 03:35 AM
rantallion: an onion that curses at you while you're chopping it up

Rob :)

reph
08-24-2005, 04:00 AM
Rantallion. A male horse that's retired from racing.

arrowqueen
08-25-2005, 01:15 AM
A dance which involves shouting at your partner.

MacAllister
08-25-2005, 05:19 AM
Ah. Well, actually, Sara was pretty darn close.

rantallion
n. - one whose scrotum is longer than his penis


I confess, I'm a bit perplexed as to what driving need prompted the formation of this particular word...
:D

So is Sara close enough, guys?

Unique
08-25-2005, 05:50 AM
Ah. Well, actually, Sara was pretty darn close.

rantallion
n. - one whose scrotum is longer than his penis


I confess, I'm a bit perplexed as to what driving need prompted the formation of this particular word...
:D

So is Sara close enough, guys?

I'd like to vote to change the definition. Everyone else's definition sounded much more logical. (But what I'd really like to know is - where did Sara run into that word - hmmm?)

reph
08-25-2005, 06:15 AM
Ah. Well, actually, Sara was pretty darn close.

rantallion
n. - one whose scrotum is longer than his penis...

So is Sara close enough, guys?
No! She wasn't close enough! We each get one more guess. It's only fair!

I'll start.

Rantallion. Um, let's see, would that mean one whose scrotum–

Uh-oh. I think I hear other players yelling something about the rules.

reph
08-25-2005, 08:25 AM
Mac, the OED doesn't have "rantallion." Where did you find it?

MacAllister
08-25-2005, 11:31 AM
Reph, I remembered seeing it in the subtitles of some obscure and weird movie an old girlfriend made me watch years ago.

I googled it, and came up a listing on this page (http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/ow_r.html).

The OED doesn't have it? Seriously? Damn it. I was actually looking forward to looking it up for etymology when I get my OED out of storage. :(

Unique
08-25-2005, 01:30 PM
My big 20#er didn't have it either, Mac. But it had some definitions for the word 'rant' that never would have occured to me. (And I still like everyone else's definition better.)

I think we should do a survey and find out if the real definition actually exists. How many would we have to check to make it statistically significant. <wicked leer>

Hey, Rob! You wanna go first?

MacAllister
08-25-2005, 02:28 PM
hmm--I found the following quote from this source (http://home.iprimus.com.au/glsealy/rantallion_2%20June%202000.htm):

Rantallion is a most remarkable word. It is not recorded in the Oxford Dictionary, nor the Shorter Oxford, nor the Macquarie Dictionary, nor Webster’s’ International Dictionary. So far as I can tell, it was first recorded in Partridge’s Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English and defined as “One whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis.”



A number of things must be said.



First, the etymology of the word is quite unknown. It has been suggested by Roger Taylor (roger.taylor@which.net) that it is “probably a blend of ‘rantipole’ [1. (noun) a romp, a wild ill-behaved or reckless person, 2 (adj) wild, disorderly or rakish] and ‘rapscallion’ [a rascal, rogue or vagabond].”

Also this (http://www.polliweb.com/2004/12/word-of-day-rantallion.html):
Word of the day: Rantallion

Here's some great slang from the early 1800s. This word should definitely be used more commonly today:

Rantallion (http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/english/RA/RANTALLION.html).

And from Webster's online (http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/english/RA/RANTALLION.html) dictionary:
Slang in 1811 (http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/books/Dictionary+of+the+Vulgar+Tongue.html)

RANTALLION. One whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis, i.e. whose shot pouch is longer that the barrel of his piece. Source: 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/books/Dictionary+of+the+Vulgar+Tongue.html).
Source: compiled by the editor (http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/credits/editor.html#) from various references (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/external-search?tag=icongroupinterna&keyword=dictionary&mode=books); see credits.



I am perfectly happy to disqualify it as too obscure and archaic, though--also, now I'm dying to know what on EARTH that movie was, I can't remember for the life of me...

Also, I wanna know where on earth Sara ran across the word, too...

Unique
08-25-2005, 03:09 PM
1811. That explains it, Mac. I was only 2 years old.:D

robeiae
08-25-2005, 05:08 PM
*sigh*...I don't know how you people get through the day:

Dr. Nicholas P. Rant, a physiker in 18th century Boston, had a patient whose name he listed only as "John." According to Dr. Rant's notes, John was quite the playboy (a rapscallion, if you will). Upon examining John, Dr. Rant discovered his rather unusual feature. John explained how this feature brought him great success with the women of Boston, owing to their need to overhandle fruit when checking for ripeness. John further explained that he achieved this feature by tying a cord about his sack, then attacing a lead weight to the other end of the cord. Dr. Rant was so moved by the tale that he tried it himself. A year later, Dr. Rant found himself divorced and disgraced, but quite happy as John's heir-apparent as Boston's most successful Casanova.

Rob :)

Sarita
08-25-2005, 06:16 PM
Also, I wanna know where on earth Sara ran across the word, too... The slang dictionary makes sense... My brother had/has a really comprehensive one and I spent hours finding *blush* swear words that no one else would know. The only other place I can think I might have heard it is from my friend Renee. Prepare yourself for a gross story...

Her husband was over her parents house working on the roof with Renees Dad (his father-in-law). The FIL had really short shorts on, so short that the pockets stuck out beneath the jeans. According to the husband, the FIL's scrotum was so long, it peaked out from under the jeans several times during the course of the day. Apparently the FIL doesn't like to wear underwear with his Daisy Dukes. So, there's a good chance one of my friends dropped Rantillion in the course of the story telling.

I honestly can't remember and I didn't remember that it had anything to do with a scrotum, penis or genitalia at all. I was leaning more toward some sort of sex act. So, it's really not fair to say I was close enough.

Unique
08-25-2005, 06:31 PM
*sigh*...I don't know how you people get through the day:

Dr. Nicholas P. Rant, a physiker in 18th century Boston, had a patient whose name he listed only as "John." According to Dr. Rant's notes, John was quite the playboy (a rapscallion, if you will). Upon examining John, Dr. Rant discovered his rather unusual feature. John explained how this feature brought him great success with the women of Boston, owing to their need to overhandle fruit when checking for ripeness. John further explained that he achieved this feature by tying a cord about his sack, then attacing a lead weight to the other end of the cord. Dr. Rant was so moved by the tale that he tried it himself. A year later, Dr. Rant found himself divorced and disgraced, but quite happy as John's heir-apparent as Boston's most successful Casanova.

Rob :)

Well, Mr. Smartypants....We wonder how you get through the day with such an overlarge brain swelling your head. Doesn't it give you headaches? Or is that why you only have one eye showing? The other having been popped out from the pressure....>pbbbt< :p

MacAllister
08-25-2005, 06:37 PM
I vote we give the next serve to Rob, for his creative etymology...

reph
08-25-2005, 10:45 PM
I have Partridge's slang dictionary. "Rantallion" is in it, all right. I should have checked there first.

Partridge credits Grose (Dict. of Vulg. Tongue) with recording it, so whoever said Partridge first recorded it didn't read carefully.

MacAllister
08-26-2005, 12:09 AM
Oh dear. I've just realized that we've been playing this game for months. It's one of the first threads I check. No one actually drops out of the game.

And now Rob has put "rantallion" in his user title.

We are such geeks.

Sarita
08-26-2005, 12:13 AM
We are such geeks. As if there was ever any doubt. Revel in the geekdom, Mac, embrace it. :)

reph
08-26-2005, 03:10 AM
My inner geek wants another word to guess at. Where's Rob? Off fiddling with weights?

robeiae
08-26-2005, 03:20 AM
Har, har, har.

prodspondor

Rob :)

Unique
08-26-2005, 03:21 AM
My inner geek wants another word to guess at. Where's Rob? Off fiddling with weights?

I think he went to measure his rantallion.

Ella
08-26-2005, 10:26 AM
How obscure can we get?

I have a word.

keeboarp

Really. It's a word.

Ella
08-26-2005, 10:28 AM
prodspondor

Rob :)

A farmer who uses a stick to poke the piglets of the neighbouring farmer to see if they are of a better stock than his own.

reph
08-26-2005, 11:03 AM
Prodspondor. A poetry coach who, for a fee, will inspect limericks and give a punitive jab in the ribs to writers who use spondees where they're supposed to use dactyls.

arrowqueen
08-26-2005, 10:40 PM
A frog, with a speech impediment, laying eggs.

MacAllister
08-26-2005, 10:49 PM
Prodspondor: n. a large, now-extinct, prehistoric mammal, armor-plated with a single horn protruding from its snout, believed to have been characteristically surly by nature.

Unique
08-28-2005, 04:12 PM
OK, so the next word is: ?

To be posted by: ?

MacAllister
08-28-2005, 07:33 PM
Errr---I think we're still waiting to see what "prodspondor" means, Unique--I just sorta made that definition up...

Unique
08-28-2005, 08:01 PM
since I've never heard that word before, I thought that was the real definition.

prodspondor, prodspondor,
what for art thou
prodspondor?

A: The wand they wave over your purchases at the checkout to read the barcode.

arrowqueen
08-28-2005, 10:40 PM
Actually, I suspect rob made the word up and has run away, sniggering.

robeiae
08-28-2005, 11:08 PM
Rob has been dealing with power losses and storm cleanup, thank you very much! :)

Does this mean everyone has given up? Okay, I'll reveal, but noone was even close, so someone has to volunteer for the next word.

prodspondor (n.) an intricate but nonexistent machine or machine system

It's a variant of transpondor. It appeared in WWII among military men instructing others in using complicated machines. As a joke, bogus manuals were prepared for non-existent equipment; prodspondor stuck as a catch-all for such equipment.

Rob :)

inexperiencedinker
08-29-2005, 01:14 AM
A frog, with a speech impediment, laying eggs.

I just spit coffee all over my computer...good guess! ROFL!

reph
08-29-2005, 02:26 AM
Rob, maybe you get to propose the next word because you stumped everybody. For all I know, we have a rule like that.

MacAllister
08-29-2005, 04:45 AM
yep
none of us were even close
Rob goes again!

Ella
08-29-2005, 05:35 AM
Heyyy. I had a word.



keeboarp.

(Boy, are we all going to be mad when I can't find that page in the book again. *grin*)

reph
08-29-2005, 07:59 AM
Mac says it's Rob's turn. Ella says it's Ella's turn. Maybe you two can work it out in the Mods forum? I don't want to see all the blood and feathers.

Ella
08-29-2005, 08:10 AM
*ahem* See post #204.

MacAllister
08-29-2005, 08:30 AM
Ella is here, and a new player. Rob is NOT here. We want a new word. I vote we let the new player buy her way into the game with Keeboarp.

What do you guys think?

Ella
08-29-2005, 08:32 AM
Damn. If I picked the word right below keeboarp, that would be even funnier.

arrowqueen
08-29-2005, 04:28 PM
That's how I spell 'keyboard' after I've had a few vodkas of a Friday evening.

arrowqueen
08-29-2005, 04:30 PM
Either that or it's Afrikaans for the noise a lion makes after eating too many okapi.

robeiae
08-29-2005, 11:19 PM
I'm still cleaning up from Katrina...Ella's turn.

Rob :)

reph
08-30-2005, 03:43 AM
All right, looks like a consensus–

Keeboarp. A musical instrument traditional in the Danish countryside, made of wood salvaged from discarded skis and harps.

Ella
08-30-2005, 04:00 AM
Beautiful tries.

keeboarp: origin - Boonville Lingo, a deliberately contrived jargon spoken extensively between 1880 and 1920. Adults could gossip without fear of their children or outsiders understanding. definition: premature male orgasm.


Okay. Kinda obvious there was a innuendo there, but the word itself is cool. Also from that era:
afe: fart
dreef: interrupted coitus.

reph
08-30-2005, 04:21 AM
definition: premature male orgasm.
This inspires me to ask why there are no premature female orgasms.

Ella
08-30-2005, 04:48 AM
Maybe it's cuz premature is better than not at all. :D

robeiae
08-31-2005, 02:37 AM
This inspires me to ask why there are no premature female orgasms.
It's all in your point of view...

Rob :)

robeiae
09-01-2005, 06:05 AM
Okay, someone needs to man up and give us a new word...now.

I'm waiting...

Rob :)

Sarita
09-01-2005, 06:21 AM
Wait! I just want to say thanks to Rob. Drohsky was in one of my class readings tonight! :) You rock, man. Rock!

reph
09-01-2005, 10:01 AM
I've got one.

glabella

pianoman5
09-01-2005, 04:01 PM
Nice one, reph.

Much more attractive and euphonious than mesophyron.

Sounds faintly rude, too.

'Lost in their torrid moment of passion, Quentin clasped Iphegenia firmly against his chest and began to gently massage her glabella. She moaned softly and...' etc. etc.

arrowqueen
09-01-2005, 04:43 PM
A very pretty gla.

Sarita
09-01-2005, 04:44 PM
glabella Ooo, ooo, ooo!!! I know this one! I'll wait it out. We could all use a bit of humour :) Here's my fake guess:

Glabella-A heafty southern belle.

robeiae
09-01-2005, 04:47 PM
glabella: that punching-bag thingy hanging from the back of your throat?

Rob :)

reph
09-01-2005, 09:29 PM
'Lost in their torrid moment of passion, Quentin clasped Iphegenia firmly against his chest and began to gently massage her glabella. She moaned softly and...' etc. etc.
Actually, he could do that, if she consented.

MacAllister
09-01-2005, 10:13 PM
urmmm...the little divot in your upper lip? No. That's wrong. That's something else, but I don't remember what.

arrowqueen
09-01-2005, 11:11 PM
That's your philtrum.

MacAllister
09-01-2005, 11:16 PM
That just sounds dirty.

arrowqueen
09-03-2005, 02:17 AM
I thought it sounded like a musical instrument: 'Now let's give a big hand to Rockin' Eddie on the philtrum.'

arrowqueen
09-03-2005, 02:18 AM
Anyway, back to glabella. It sounds like a body part, possibly eye-ballish and definitely squishy.

Unique
09-03-2005, 02:29 AM
It does sound squishy, but it really isn't. (At last! A word I know.)

I didn't realize how limited my vocabulary was til I started hanging out with youse guys.

robeiae
09-03-2005, 04:22 AM
'philtrum' comes from Ancient Rome:

Emperor Caligula was upset at a guest visting from Asia Minor, one Philateas (they called him Phil for short). So Caligula asked a centurian to teach Phil a lesson by cutting off his mustache. The centurian used his sword...He gave Phil a trim that seperated his top lip from the surface to the back of his throat. Thus: Phil's trim=philtrum

Rob :)

Shwebb
09-05-2005, 07:14 AM
Pardon me for butting in. . . isn't the glabella the space between your eyes? I seem to remember something about it in college A & P class. (I can tell you where your ziphoid process is, too!)

MacAllister
09-05-2005, 08:47 AM
Ohhhh....nobody likes a newcomer who knows more than us. So, is it? Is that right? Do we make Schwebb come up with the next word, then?

reph
09-05-2005, 09:07 AM
Close enough. The glabella is the smooth area between your eyebrows. Yeah, I guess it's Shwebb's turn. Is that how we do it? I haven't looked at the rules lately.

MacAllister
09-05-2005, 09:25 AM
Reph--I'm detecting a teensy little fixation about this rule thing...I suppose I shouldn't be suprised by that, eh? :)

Shwebb
09-05-2005, 09:28 AM
Hope this one isn't too easy, but I just had to go w/ it because it has the word "meat" in it. YUM!:popcorn:

(I do soooo love medical terms. I just wrote a non-fiction work w/ the word "smegma" in it! When I was in high school anatomy class: "Oh, we had a great vacation; we visited the Islets of Langerhans, and we took a boating trip down the Haversian canals. Lovely spleenery.)

So I do apologize if this one is easy. If I get another turn, I promise to pick out something more challenging.

jdkiggins
09-05-2005, 09:29 AM
ewwwww, are you stuck on body parts? LOL