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TsukiRyoko
01-25-2009, 06:53 PM
Name some of your favorite children's books, either from when you were a child or storybooks you like to read to your children. If it's a big collector's book, then please tell me your favorite story in the book.

When I was younger, I used to love this huge blue book with golden tipped pages. It seemed like it had a million stories in it (though I'm sure it seemed bigger when I was younger). I can't remember the name of it, but it had all the classics in it- Cinderella, Rumpelstiltskin, The Little Mermaid, Rapunzel, the whole shebang.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 06:56 PM
No.

Oh all right then.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - CS Lewis
Charlotte's Web - EB White
The Twits - Roald Dahl
Tom's Midnight Garden - Philippa Pearce

All of which captivated me as a kiddywinkle, all of which I read over and over again as an adult.

TsukiRyoko
01-25-2009, 06:59 PM
No.

Oh all right then.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - CS Lewis
Charlotte's Web - EB White
The Twits - Roald Dahl
Tom's Midnight Garden - Philippa Pearce

All of which captivated me as a kiddywinkle, all of which I read over and over again as an adult.
When I was younger, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe scared me so bad I couldn't sleep. Every time the lion died I freaked, and I was afraid that "the bad lady" would get me in my sleep for knowing about the secret world of Narnia :D

Mr Flibble
01-25-2009, 07:12 PM
Ooh yes the gold-tipped books were the best. I still have my Legends of King Arthur one, which was probably what got me into fantasy.

Richard Scarry was great, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Black Beauty ( I was obsessed with horses), the Narnia books.

Actually I would pretty much read anything, but those are the ones I remember most vividly.

JHillman
01-25-2009, 07:21 PM
This may be a little older (reader age) than some mentioned:

The Man Who Was Magic- by Paul Gallico

Amarie
01-25-2009, 07:42 PM
Oh, I loved Harriet the Spy and A Wrinkle in Time. What great memories!

Polenth
01-25-2009, 07:43 PM
I liked a lot of books as a child. Some favourites were the Griffin Reader Series (Sheila K McCullagh), 'The Horse and His Boy' (C. S. Lewis) and most things by Roald Dahl. In poetry, I liked Ogden Nash and Lewis Carroll.

Not much has changed, except I've read more children's books. Some recent favourites are 'The Graveyard Book (Neil Gaiman), 'Diary of a Wimpy Kid' (Jeff Kinney) and 'The Gruffalo' (Julia Donaldson).

Giant monsters are always a plus, for any children's story.

(I posted a list of some of my favourites to my blog (http://polenth.blogspot.com/2009/01/100-books-i-enjoyed.html) yesterday, coincidentally enough).

Jenan Mac
01-25-2009, 07:49 PM
Our co-op (homeschoolers between 9-11) has been reading a bunch of the books, mostly (but not all) on the Newbery and Sunshine State Reader lists. Some of the favorites were My Side of the Mountain, Flush, and Out of Patience. The hands-down winner belonged to AW's very own Toothpaste: Alex and the Ironic Gentleman.

As for little bitty kid books, my all-time favorite is Ferdinand.

tehuti88
01-25-2009, 07:53 PM
I loved the "Serendipity" books. The illustrations and lush landscapes in the backgrounds, for example in "Morgan & Yew" (I think that's what it was?--about a sheep who was jealous of a unicorn's horn), had me wishing I could go to those places. I always wanted every one of those books but I had only a few, there were just so many of them.

nevada
01-25-2009, 08:27 PM
I didn't read a lot of children's books when i was little and regardless, the ones i did read were dutch. lol but there were some.

I had my mom's complete collection of grimms fairytales. unabridged, unedited for little kiddies. with illustrations by anton piek. ( i was going to link but the addie was huge. lol he was born in 1840 and his illustrations are amazing.)

I read a book called Puck of the Petteflet. (a flet is an apartment building) about this kid who lives by himself in an apartment building with strange people and creatures living there.

and there was a book about some teenagers who travel back in time and get involved in the children's crusade, books about WWII and books the old sailing ships of the 16th and 17th century. I would classify those as lad lit but i loved them anyway. A very schmaltzy book about a teenager who becomes a ballerina, works in a circus and falls in love with a russian horse acrobat who dies, overcomes his death and finally stars in a triumphant ballet of Theseus and Ariadna (or something like that).. very, very shmaltzy. lol

i read wrinkle in time in dutch and i remember being so impressed by it. and then i read it again last year when she died and i was so disappointed.

that was all before i hit about 11, at which time i moved on to more adult books.

and then, one day, in canada, i was about 13, i found the books by Sally Watson in the library. And I read them all, over and over again. They were amazing.

Eldritch
01-25-2009, 09:22 PM
Key to the Treasure by Peggy Parish.

TsukiRyoko
01-25-2009, 09:47 PM
Has anyone read The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling? I thought it was cool that she wrote it after its mention in The Deathly Hallows as a way of completing HP. My mom picked it up for me as a Christmas present ("Andrea, you're the only person I know who reads children's books in college, and read 500 pg novels when you were twelve"). The stories are fun, I would have enjoyed them quite a bit as bedtime stories when I was younger (especially Babbitty Rabbitty and her Cackling Stump :D)

Blondchen
01-25-2009, 10:18 PM
I'm going to totally date myself but...

Superfudge and Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume
Help! I'm a Prisoner in the Library by Eth Clifford
The Littles by John Peterson
The House With a Clock In Its Walls and The Mummy, the Will and the Crypt by John Bellairs
Below the Root by Zilpha Keatly Snyder
and the Susan Cooper Dark is Rising series.

K1P1
01-25-2009, 10:24 PM
Melisande by E. Nesbit (and every other book she's written, but Melisande is a real gem)
Lucy Boston's Green Knowe books
Zilpha Keatly Snyder's books

ccarver30
01-26-2009, 12:00 AM
Aristocats!

josephwise
01-26-2009, 09:17 PM
My favorite picture book was The Mysteries of Harris Burdick.

Every writer should have that. It really shows the power of a great "hook."

trickywoo
01-26-2009, 09:46 PM
Just was reading the "Frog and Toad" stories (A. Loebel) to my toddler the other day. I loved them as a kid - the illustrations are imprinted on my brain, and they're brilliant.

"The whole world is full of buttons," Toad said. "And none of them is mine!"

Drama, mystery, angst, what more can you ask for?

Love them.

trickywoo
01-26-2009, 09:48 PM
I loved the "Serendipity" books. The illustrations and lush landscapes in the backgrounds, for example in "Morgan & Yew" (I think that's what it was?--about a sheep who was jealous of a unicorn's horn), had me wishing I could go to those places. I always wanted every one of those books but I had only a few, there were just so many of them.

OK. So I grew up on these too and loved them as a kid. But when I reread them as an adult, they totally creeped me out. The one with the fat cat who has no friends? So she exercises and diets and then she has friends! A lot of them have these ... um ... unfortunate morals to the story that don't quite cut it.

Don't want to crash your childhood memories, because it was a sad discovery for me, but I was totally appalled by them when I read them again.

trickywoo
01-26-2009, 09:49 PM
My favorite picture book was The Mysteries of Harris Burdick.

Every writer should have that. It really shows the power of a great "hook."

Yes! Still love this book!

Saskatoonistan
01-26-2009, 09:53 PM
Goodnight Moon :)

Kate Thornton
01-26-2009, 09:56 PM
Five Children and It - E. Nesbit
All of her books, actually - I liked The Wouldbegoods series a lot, too.

Teenie Weenie Town - William Donahey

The Flying Islands of the Night - James Whitcomb Riley

The Arabian Nights - Kate Douglas Wiggin & Nora A. Smith, Illustrations by Maxfield Parrish edition

The Enchanted Places - Christopher Milne

alleycat
01-26-2009, 10:04 PM
I'll add the Frog and Toad books to the list.

swvaughn
01-26-2009, 10:56 PM
Oh boy...

Where the Wild Things Are
Harold and the Purple Crayon
A Wrinkle in Time
Any Choose-Your-Own-Adventure book (especially this one that had dragons and wizards and spiders and some kind of fluffy deadly stuff that no one believes existed because I can't remember the details, but I remember this one option word for word from the end of one section: C. You are a flashlight. Turn to page 68...)
The Honey Bunch series
Christine (yeah, I started on Stephen King early)
Goodnight Moon
The Pokey Little Puppy
The Saggy, Baggy Elephant
The Great Big Elephant and the Very Little Elephant
Tikki Tikki Tembo
Where the Sidewalk Ends

Right, that's all I can think of for now. :D

selkn.asrai
01-26-2009, 11:08 PM
Oh! How child are we talking?

For picture books:

The Runaway Bunny.

The Velveteen Rabbit.

All things Beatrix Potter.

Make Way For Ducklings.

Ferdinand.

When I got into the novel-reading stage, I loved Nancy Drew and Lois Duncan. And the Dear America series. I adored all historicals. Summer of the Swans made me cry; so did The Lottery Rose. I loved anything to do with ghosts, like Wait Til Helen Comes and Stonewords.

Once I hit 12, though, I wandered from the YA section for Fiction & Literature at the bookstore. Now, when I get assigned to work in Childrens, I get excited. It's so peaceful and innocent back there. And they have a lot of amazing and beautiful picture books that I didn't have growing up.

TsukiRyoko
01-26-2009, 11:58 PM
Any Choose-Your-Own-Adventure book (especially this one that had dragons and wizards and spiders and some kind of fluffy deadly stuff that no one believes existed because I can't remember the details, but I remember this one option word for word from the end of one section: C. You are a flashlight. Turn to page 68...)


Oh jeez, I remember reading those books as a kid. I loved those things! I never seemed to pick the right options, though, since my character always got into some sort of trouble and I'd have to skip back x amount of pages to get back on track. It was then I decided that I would not make a good adventurer, and should stick to playing video gaems and reading instead of breaking into creepy abandoned houses and following trails of goo.

Ken
01-27-2009, 12:12 AM
Island of the Blue Dolphins, Scott O'Dell
Julie of the Wolves, Jean George
Hatchet, Gary Paulson

waylander
01-27-2009, 03:08 AM
The Little Grey Men
Down the Bright Stream

Can't believe someone hasn't mentioned these two

Mr. Anonymous
01-27-2009, 03:23 AM
Out of all the books I read when I was a kid, Where The Red Fern Grows made the most of an impression on me.

Most of the other books I read when I was young where kiddie versions of the classics (Rubinson Crusoe, The Count of Monte Cristo, Black Beauty (don't know how I managed it, but I did), Treasure Island, The Three Musketeers, etc).

sapphireeye
01-27-2009, 03:27 AM
Enid Blyton stuff - mainly the famous five (Should I be ashamed to admit that considering she was accused of being sexist and racist? I read them in the early 90's when I was a child and young innocent children like I was don't pick up on that sort of thing, I definitely didn't!)
A little princess
The secret garden
Alice in wonderland
Winnie The Pooh (My dad bought me a massive book with loads of stories and the 'When we were young' poems.)
Beatrix Potter's books
What Katie Did
I also loved my Spike Milligan poetry books
I'm pretty sure that I first read Northern Lights when I was about 11/12 too.

WittyWordsmith
01-31-2009, 05:56 AM
The Giving Tree, by Shell Silverstein
The Chronicles of Narnia
The Nancy Drew Series

DMarie84
01-31-2009, 09:55 PM
A Wrinkle in Time was good.

I also liked the American Girl series, with all the stories taking place in different time periods. Those books are what got me interested in writing historical fiction.

JosephB
02-01-2009, 03:33 AM
Goodnight Moon :)

My children love it. I do not.

OctoberRain
02-01-2009, 07:06 AM
Oh man, so many...

In no particular order:

Narnia series
Richard Scarry books
Everything by Beverly Cleary (especially the ones starring Ramona Quimby)
Dr. Seuss
Shel Silverstein's stuff
Choose Your Own Adventures
Mother Goose

Quossum
02-01-2009, 08:49 AM
Yes on The Saggy, Baggy Elephant! Wow, I loved that book as a kid!

Sir Toby Jingle's Beastly Journey, especially the illustrations which contained even more details and little comments than the text of the story.

The Giving Tree. It always made me cry!

Then, a little bit older...

The Narnia series. I still reward myself periodically by letting myself reread them.

The Dragonriders of Pern, up to All the Weyrs of Pern, where according to all decency the series should have ended.

The Green Poodles

An Edge of the Forest

Black Beauty and The Black Stallion and its whole series, and pretty much any book featuring dogs or horses.

--Q

Barb D
02-01-2009, 09:35 AM
My 9yo just checked this out of the library. She loves Chris Van Allsburg. Now I'll have to read it!


My favorite picture book was The Mysteries of Harris Burdick.

Every writer should have that. It really shows the power of a great "hook."

I read and re-read and re-read anything by Madeleine L'Engle. I loved the Wrinkle in Time series, but also the Polly O'Keefe books (about Meg and Calvin's daughter) and the Vicky Austin books, which had some crossover characters between them. I always wanted Vicky and Polly to meet, but they never did.

I named my MC Polly as a nod to ML'E, although my 15yo, the real life inspiration for the character, insists she was named after the Nirvana song.

RunawayScribe
02-01-2009, 09:39 AM
Where the Wild Things Are
Charlotte's Web
The Narnia Series
The Julie and the Wolves series
Ella Enchanted
The American Girl books
Any Nancy Drew
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle
...and on and on, really. I read a LOT as a kid. I even read a lot of nonfiction. My parents would seriously just leave me in the library some days.

jennifer75
02-01-2009, 10:02 AM
My favorite book when I was young was Jennifer's Walk.

It was a very simple story, short.

But the adventure was amazing. The artwork was a story in itself. You didn't need the words printed on the page to tell you more than what was told in the pictures.

I held on to my copy for years, then got careless, and now....I can't find it. Well I can find it, but not under $95 used.

http://www.amazon.com/Jennifers-Walk-Anne-Carriere/dp/0307125025

So upsetting.

Kateri
02-01-2009, 10:30 AM
Oh Enid Blyton and the Famous Five, the Magic Faraway Tree. My father gave me Jack London books, which I loved. So many, but lately, Skellig by David Almond, exquisite book,The Secret Garden still resonates with me.

Red.Ink.Rain
02-01-2009, 11:05 AM
Definitely Narnia and A Wrinkle in Time. I reread read those at least three times every year. Actually...I still reread them a lot. I love them.

marie2
02-02-2009, 04:49 AM
"The Little Prince" by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

I loved it so much I have it in French, English and Spanish.

TerzaRima
02-02-2009, 08:21 AM
Gone-Away Lake and Return to Gone-Away Lake. Linnets and Valerians. Up a Road Slowly.

BenPanced
02-02-2009, 09:44 AM
The Dorrie the Little Witch books by Patricia Coombs. We named a cat after her familiar Gink.

The Animated Thumbtack Railroad Dollhouse and All-Around Surprise Book by Louis Phillips. Rather Monty Python-esque humor for a kid's book.

The original Dune trilogy by Frank Herbert, which I tackled when I was 14.

KTC
02-02-2009, 03:45 PM
No.

Oh all right then.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - CS Lewis
Charlotte's Web - EB White
The Twits - Roald Dahl
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl





I'm going to crib from Judas's's list and edit the last selection. See above.

selkn.asrai
02-02-2009, 07:47 PM
Oh my, how could I have forgotten Milne's Winnie the Pooh? I also loved the His Dark Materials trilogy when I first read it.

Sad thing is, I don't see a lot of the YA novels I read on the shelves anymore. Unless it won a Newbery, it's difficult to acquire. The ones that are still on the shelves don't see a lot of purchases. I remember having a 10-minute conversation with a little girl who asked me about which Nancy Drew to read next. I was honestly surprised, because all the kids I help read Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Twilight and the Clique series.

nevada
02-02-2009, 08:13 PM
Dark Materials is Phillip Pulman, not A A Milne. lol When we were very young is one of my fav books and i totally forgot about that. I have it in dutch and then my mom gave it to me in english about ten yrs back for xmas. just love it.

selkn.asrai
02-02-2009, 11:10 PM
Dark Materials is Phillip Pulman, not A A Milne. lol When we were very young is one of my fav books and i totally forgot about that. I have it in dutch and then my mom gave it to me in english about ten yrs back for xmas. just love it.


lol, I know it's by Pullman, but as a series, it's called His Dark Materials. Hence "the His Dark Materials." ;)

nevada
02-02-2009, 11:20 PM
lol, I know it's by Pullman, but as a series, it's called His Dark Materials. Hence "the His Dark Materials." ;)

Doh. I'm an idiot.

AceTachyon
02-03-2009, 02:04 AM
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Choose Your Own Adventures books

Then in 5th/6th grade, I discovered D&D, The Hobbit, LotR and the first two Shannara books.

I also remember one book that I ended up losing somehow, somewhere. I think it was called The Crown Snatchers or similar. About three kids who end up in this kingdom run by an elephant king with rhino guards (I think that's how it went). Kind of a demented Alice in Wonderland. Can no longer seem to find a copy, even in a used book store.

TerzaRima
02-03-2009, 02:15 AM
Does anyone remember Snow Treasure? It's set in Norway during WWII, and the plot involves children sledding past Nazi soldiers with bricks of gold bullion hidden on their sleds--basically smuggling the wealth out of Norway. Awesome book, and apparently a true story.

I loved myths as a kid--Tanglewood Tales was my introduction, and I had the D'aulaire book of Greek and Roman myths as well.

Deccydiva
02-03-2009, 02:38 AM
The Wind in the Willows! Sexist, elitist, misogynistic but we didn't (a) notice or (b) care in the early 1960's.

Melisande
06-15-2014, 08:12 AM
Name some of your favorite children's books, either from when you were a child or storybooks you like to read to your children. If it's a big collector's book, then please tell me your favorite story in the book.

When I was younger, I used to love this huge blue book with golden tipped pages. It seemed like it had a million stories in it (though I'm sure it seemed bigger when I was younger). I can't remember the name of it, but it had all the classics in it- Cinderella, Rumpelstiltskin, The Little Mermaid, Rapunzel, the whole shebang.

Anything written by Elsa Beskow, Astrid Lindgren, the brothers Grimm, H C Andersen and JRR Tolkien. I also loved (and still do) a set of books called "Bland Tomtar och Troll" which contained ancient Nordic fairy-tales. I haven't found any kind of translation of those, but you have no idea what you've missed out on.

I was also partial to Ethel Turner, A A Milne, L M Montgomery, W E Johns, Mark Twain, L M Alcott and Enid Blyton. Basically I read anything I could get my hands on.

Those were the authors of the books I loved to read. To try and name just one book is impossible. But I can say that there was also the Reader's Digests "Ungdomsbocker" (freely translated to "Books for Youths") several volumes which contained lots and lots of short stories that I remember to this day, as well as a whole lot of tips that I do believe had a lot to do with camping, scouts and other outdoor stuff.

JustSarah
06-15-2014, 08:43 AM
Classics -- Hans Christian Anderson's fairy tales, Mary Poppins.
Picture Books -- Where The Wild Things Are.
Middle Grade Novels -- Great Gilly Hopkins.

I'm of course not including YA.

WriterTrek
06-15-2014, 09:43 AM
One of the only books I read in early childhood (<7 years old) that still stands out to me was about cats. I can't remember the name of it, but...

An old couple wanted a cat (I think). The man went out to search for a cat, but came back (somehow) with like 1000 of them. They could only keep one, so they put out some milk to see what happened, and all the cats fought over it. Finally only the smallest kitten was left, as he had ignored the fighting and played it smart. He stayed.

As for books I read when I was slightly older (but still under twelve years old), I think Adam of the Road stands out the most in my memory. Stone Fox is another, as is Snow Treasure. Some of the earlier Redwall books, especially The Long Patrol, which remains the only one of the series I have strong nostalgic feelings towards as an adult. The Great Brain at the Academy too, almost forgot that one. Read my three Super Mario Adventure Books til they fell apart.

Oh, and there was another one I can't quite remember the name of, but it had a scorpion and a bear in it, and it was slightly scary, and had something about "the claw" in the name. Cave of the claw? Dunno.

Roxxsmom
06-15-2014, 10:50 AM
O heavens, there were so many. Some of mine included:

The Hobbit by Tolkien
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Misty of Chingoteague by Margaurite Henry and most of her other horse books.
Rabbit Hill and almost anything else by Robert Lawson
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
Fly By Night by KM Peyton (I loved everything equine as a kid)
The Lad of Sunnybank books by Terhune
The Reluctant Dragon by Kenneth Grahame (may have been my first fantasy book and I was obsessed with dragons after)
The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elzabeth Coatsworth (though it still makes me cry)
Watership Down by Richard Adams (though that was marketed as adult fiction in the US I first read it as a kid)
The Wizard of Earthsea trilogy by Ursula K LeGuin
Red Planet by Robert Heinlein (I especially loved Willis).
The Little House books by Laura Ingles Wilder.
I loved the Great Brain books too, though the boy protagonists weren't terribly fond of girls.
Anything by Judy Blume.
The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken.

Picture books when I was really teeny:

Whistle for Willie
The Giving Tree
Dr. Seuss's Sleep Book (I made my mom read that to me until it fell apart)
The Three Little Horses

Mclesh
06-15-2014, 11:01 AM
O heavens, there were so many. Some of mine included:

The Hobbit by Tolkien
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Misty of Chingoteague by Margaurite Henry and most of her other horse books.
Rabbit Hill and almost anything else by Robert Lawson
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
Fly By Night by KM Peyton (I loved everything equine as a kid)
The Lad of Sunnybank books by Terhune
The Reluctant Dragon by Kenneth Grahame (may have been my first fantasy book and I was obsessed with dragons after)
The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elzabeth Coatsworth (though it still makes me cry)
Watership Down by Richard Adams (though that was marketed as adult fiction in the US I first read it as a kid)
The Wizard of Earthsea trilogy by Ursula K LeGuin
Red Planet by Robert Heinlein (I especially loved Willis).
The Little House books by Laura Ingles Wilder.
I loved the Great Brain books too, though the boy protagonists weren't terribly fond of girls.
Anything by Judy Blume.

Picture books when I was really teeny:

Whistle for Willie
The Giving Tree
Dr. Seuss's Sleep Book (I made my mom read that to me until it fell apart)
The Three Little Horses

Roxxsmom, I can't tell you how many times I read Rabbit Hill. Soooo good.

As an adult, I became acquainted with Daniel Pinkwater's books. Lizard Music is great. Quirky and fun.

Yorwick
06-15-2014, 11:18 AM
I read a lot of Greek mythology when I was little as well as anything with fantasy elements. Some of my favorites included:

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkein
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkein
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
The Chrestomanci books by Diana Wynne Jones
The Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling (especially Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban)

I also really loved (and still do) historical fiction like The Scarlet Pimpernel books by Baroness Orczy and the novels of Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson.

I was a pretty dark kid and read a number of books that would not be considered age appropriate such as:

The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo, The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux and Dracula by Bram Stoker. My English teacher was horrified when she realized I was reading Hunchback (I was 9 at the time). She said it would damage me psychologically.
Maybe she was right - I'm writing my PhD thesis on psychological and aesthetic interpretations of the monster figure in silent film adaptations of Gothic novels. :evil