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View Full Version : How would you react if the movie of your book was MUCH DIFFERENT than your book?



underthecity
01-24-2009, 05:42 PM
In the Book Club forum, I posted about how different the Forrest Gump movie was compared to the book. About the only thing that was the same was the concept. And the movie was a hit. Without the movie, the book was probably doomed to obscurity. (Judging by the copyright page, I believe the book was self-published at first.)

Stephen King is reported to have disliked Kubrick's version of The Shining, since the director left out the basic themes that were present in the book. Meanwhile, the movie became a horror classic. Of course, without King's novel, there would never have been a film like it.

Other movies made from novels are similar in theme, setting, and characters but the plots and situations have been altered. MASH comes to mind.

In other cases, movie adaptations have been made that almost mirror the books. The Jason Bourne movies are an example. The Harry Potter movies are almost identical to the books except they left out subplots and parts of the story to condense them into the two-hour timeframe. The characters and themes were left intact.

Which brings me to my question.

Let's say your book is made into a big-budget movie, by which I don't mean Vanity Productions or some other company that ends up not producing anything at all. We can even say the movie has Big Stars in it and was directed by A Big Name Director. We can also go further to say that the movie was a Big Hit and further propelled sales of your book a millionfold.

But the film they made was somewhat different than your book. It was not like Harry Potter or Jason Bourne. They kept your characters and basic story, but many alterations were made for the sake of film. The MC is diametrically opposite than what you conceived. The basic themes are gone. The plot goes differently. Even the ending has been changed into a "Hollywood ending" suitable for the big screen.

What is your reaction as author?

Greenify13
01-24-2009, 05:50 PM
I must say that if this would happen to me, I would be angered. But then I become angry easy. For things to go drastically wrong is 'a slap on the face'. However, to be realistic I would have to realize that book could become more of a 'hit' after the movie, (unless the movie is a sham).
Everyone who writes has an idea of what everything looks and goes like. And every reader has their own opinions.
As a reader and person who watches connected movies: I have to admit I don't think I have ever seen a movie that best suited its book-halve. And sometimes its the opposite, there are movies that make up for something missing in the book...

Susan Gable
01-24-2009, 05:51 PM
Curse under my breath all the way to the bank. :D

Susan G.

Albedo
01-24-2009, 05:57 PM
Insist there not be a 'novelisation of the movie'.

Deccydiva
01-24-2009, 06:02 PM
Curse under my breath all the way to the bank. :D

Susan G.

I agree totally!

Fenika
01-24-2009, 06:02 PM
Since I write fantasy, it's almost guaranteed hollywood will muck it up ;)

So count me with those cursing all the way to the bank.

underthecity
01-24-2009, 06:05 PM
Kind of my reaction too, although I would forever be critiquing the movie as I watched it endlessly on Blu-Ray.

Puma
01-24-2009, 06:06 PM
A movie company made a television mini-series from one of my Dad's books (and did a good job of sticking to the story). But, they left out a few foreshadowing touches that were very nice in the book - and everyone who had read the book before the mini came out noticed and complained - and these were small touches, nothing major.

It can be a shock to see what types of actors and actresses are picked to portray the characters in the book and what types of sets are used when you have a pre-formed opinion of what they should look like. The whole experience was one of contrasts.

And on the laughing all the way to the bank - this was my only experience with a movie contract and there was only one payment for the movie rights - no royalties. But that could be because it was a television mini-series rather than a box office item. Puma

Fenika
01-24-2009, 06:07 PM
Kind of my reaction too, although I would forever be critiquing the movie as I watched it endlessly on Blu-Ray.

No no no, get the one with the directors comments so you can scream and yell at the tv while they say things that are against your vision :D

Albedo
01-24-2009, 06:20 PM
No no no, get the one with the directors comments so you can scream and yell at the tv while they say things that are against your vision :D

Better yet, get yourself ON the commentary, so viewers at home can hear you trading barbs/yelling incoherently at the director.

jvc
01-24-2009, 06:28 PM
I'm with the 'curse under my breath all the way to the bank' crowd, although I'd probably be skipping and singing between the curses.

WriteKnight
01-24-2009, 06:28 PM
I think most authors are savvy to these issues by this point in time. Depending on the deal, you may or may not be able to excercise some leverage in the script - not likely at all with a first time deal.

Cursing to the bank is probably the best you can do. If you don't want your work dramatized by someone else, and you can't get the deal to do the script - and you're worried they'll muck it up - don't sell it.

For what it's worth, one of my screenplay options was on a script created from an unpublished novel I wrote. The script followed the novel more or less perfectly, the only changes being to condense the story-line and combine a few plot points. IN the re-write process after the option, it slowly, painfully, VERY PAINFULLY became clear, that they optioned the script because they were more interested in the secondary storyline than the primary one. Imagine you had written a story about BATMAN and robin, facing THE JOKER. They love it, they option it, and start asking for little 'changes' here and there. By the time you are done, the story is ROBIN MEETS Batman, and they run into the clown-faced bad guy...

And it's a DAMN GOOD script. What I learned from that experience, is that any given story has a thousand other stories within it... that could just as easily hold the screen - provided they are written well. So I got over the ego blow of them not wanting the original storyline/theme, and began to enjoy the challenge of keeping the plot, and emellishing other aspects of the story.

Now, if someone ELSE was doing this to one of my stories..... I guess I would just have to hope for the best.

GirlWithPoisonPen
01-24-2009, 06:32 PM
Curse under my breath all the way to the bank. :D

Susan G.

Word.

I'd also try and get the option to write the screen play. That way when it wins an Oscar, I'd get to go up on stage and accept as shiny gold man and thank the Academy. HA! :)

semilargeintestine
01-24-2009, 06:35 PM
Whatever you do, don't let them get Charlie Kaufman to write it. Odds are, it will be a great film, but they're even greater that he'll completely change it around.

BTW, this is a joke about Adaptation. Kaufman is one of my favorite screenwriters.

underthecity
01-24-2009, 06:39 PM
I'd also try and get the option to write the screen play. That way when it wins an Oscar, I'd get to go up on stage and accept as shiny gold man and thank the Academy. HA! :)

It's funny that you say that. Acclaimed screenwriter Ring Lardner Jr. wrote the screenplay for MASH based on the novel. Robert Altman took the screenplay and used it as primarily a springboard for his film. He took out subplots and character backgrounds and motivations and many of the episodes that Lardner had written. Most of the dialogue was changed as the actors were encouraged to improvise the lines.

As a result, MASH was a huge hit (coming out at the same time as Vietnam war was going on, so the movie was seen as "anti-war").

Ring Lardner Jr. hated hated hated the movie, and told Altman, "You've ruined my movie."

Then that year Lardner was on stage at the Academy Awards accepting the Oscar for Best Screenplay.

Clair Dickson
01-24-2009, 07:30 PM
I'm in the cursing on the way to the bank thing. I can forgive a lot when the money is there. Besides, it'll drive up sales for my book, which people will realize is just SO much better to the movie.

Darzian
01-24-2009, 07:32 PM
I hate it when this happens. In Harry Potter, the Dumbledore in the movies is WAY different from that in the books. It drove me mad.

As a writer, I'm still on the fence.:e2seesaw:

Don Allen
01-24-2009, 07:34 PM
In most cases an author gives up the rights to the production company and has little say over the movie outcome, as noted sometimes it works, Godfather, a great example, exorcist another, then Frank McCourts first book, I can't remember the name I remember his second "tis' and I read the freaking thing twice, funny as hell, great perspective, Shit movie, go figure.

tehuti88
01-24-2009, 07:38 PM
Even though I think my beloved stories that I'd love to have made into movies already have Hollywood endings--if they were drastically changed I'd be pretty p*ssed off. I don't care HOW big the production is or who's in it or behind it or what. I do not want people messing with my story. It's MY story. If they want to change it a lot, then I'd rather it not be a movie at all. I would not give my permission.

I'm not in this for the money, obviously. (Or the publication, if there would be such drastic changes, though publication on my terms would be nice.) I'm in this solely to tell MY story.

MrWrite
01-24-2009, 07:39 PM
The worst one to me was Watchers by Dean Koontz. I love the book. I think it's his best work. So imagine my joy when while reading the book I found there was a movie based on the book. I ordered it through Amazon.
Imagine my frustration when I saw what had been done to the story! Every detail was changed except the most basic element. The MC had been changed from an ex marine to a high school kid! The love of his life in the book had become his mother in the movie! Now I know about poetic licence. I know some things are always changed maybe because it would take too long to show some things, so some elements are dropped or the order is changed. But I can find no reason at all to make such huge changes to the characters. Even a vet who saved the dog and became a good friend of the characters was changed. In the movie he betrayed them. I hate this movie more than any other film I have ever seen! :rant: I gave up on it after just 20 minutes and threw the tape in the bin. (Yes this was several years back before dvds!)
If that was my reaction to what had been done to someone elses story I'd hate to think what my reaction would be if something like that had been done to something I'd written! :tongue

Don Allen
01-24-2009, 07:42 PM
Jesus, i should be whipped for forgetting, "Angelas Ashes"

KikiteNeko
01-24-2009, 07:44 PM
That would be okay with me.

If any of my books went to film, I might ask to have a say in casting, but other than that I would be happy to sit back, relax, and see how the producer/screenplay writer/actors interpret my story. My job with that story would be over, and it would be time for me to enjoy what comes of it.

As long as it says "Based on the novel written by..." we're cool.

KikiteNeko
01-24-2009, 07:46 PM
It's also worth mentioning that there was a remake of The Shining, which I believe King really liked.

Polenth
01-24-2009, 07:46 PM
I see movie deals as a way to finance writing. I don't expect the movie to be good. It'd be an unexpected surprise if it turns out to be a decent adaptation.

If it does turn out to be good, I hope they make nifty toys for it too. Because action figures of my story characters would be fun.

KikiteNeko
01-24-2009, 07:47 PM
There was a movie for Tis??? Or just Angela's Ashes?


In most cases an author gives up the rights to the production company and has little say over the movie outcome, as noted sometimes it works, Godfather, a great example, exorcist another, then Frank McCourts first book, I can't remember the name I remember his second "tis' and I read the freaking thing twice, funny as hell, great perspective, Shit movie, go figure.

KTC
01-24-2009, 07:57 PM
I would try to view the movie on its own merits and judge it on how it stands by itself. I wouldn't care...if I thought the movie was good.

A good example of a movie that is much different than the book but nevertheless excellent: WONDER BOYS. There is an entire section of that book that did not hit the screen. It is the one example that I can think of where both the book and the movie are excellent. I would be looking at it from an entertainment point of view. If there were much changes from the book, it wouldn't bother me if the movie entertained/moved me. Interpretation is a wonderful thing.

underthecity
01-24-2009, 08:02 PM
It's also worth mentioning that there was a remake of The Shining, which I believe King really liked.

<snerk> The reason King liked the (awful) TV movie remake (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118460/) is because he wrote the teleplay for it. He wanted to see The Shining "done right" according to his novel. He ended up changing lots of small things and adjusted characterizations I guess to fit a "new vision." The end result was disappointing to just about everyone but my wife who liked it.

firedrake
01-24-2009, 08:06 PM
I'd bite my lip and think about the renewed increase in book sales that would be bound to follow. I'd be flattered too, if someone thought a book of mine was worth turning into a film.

RickN
01-24-2009, 08:08 PM
Book -- my vision.
Movie -- the director's vision.

No reason for me to assume that we'll see things the same way. I may not like the changes to my plot/characters/setting/etc, but I'm the one who voluntarily sold them to someone else. I'll either get over it or never sell movie-rights again.

KikiteNeko
01-24-2009, 08:11 PM
<snerk> The reason King liked the (awful) TV movie remake (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118460/) is because he wrote the teleplay for it. He wanted to see The Shining "done right" according to his novel. He ended up changing lots of small things and adjusted characterizations I guess to fit a "new vision." The end result was disappointing to just about everyone but my wife who liked it.

I liked it.

willietheshakes
01-24-2009, 08:24 PM
I'm still puzzled on how the Damon Bourne movies are a faithful adaptation...

selkn.asrai
01-24-2009, 08:38 PM
Whatever you do, don't let them get Charlie Kaufman to write it. Odds are, it will be a great film, but they're even greater that he'll completely change it around.

BTW, this is a joke about Adaptation. Kaufman is one of my favorite screenwriters.


Or the director from The Golden Compass. Damn, did he f ck that one up. At his insistence. And it flopped.

Darzian:

Dumbledore is different in the movies (post-Richard Harris) because Michael Gambon didn't read the books. He bases Dumbledore off of his interpretation of the script, not on Rowling's character.

I'm not a fan of Harry Potter. But I really enjoy Gambon's Dumbledore so much better than the book's Dumbledore. Nevertheless, as far as the book's character goes, you couldn't get someone closer than Richard Harris... gawd, he was awesome... ever see Count of Monte Cristo?

semilargeintestine
01-24-2009, 10:16 PM
Or the director from The Golden Compass. Damn, did he f ck that one up. At his insistence. And it flopped.

Ha. I never saw The Golden Compass, nor did I have any desire to. It seemed like a crappy rendition of what could have been a good book.

The thing about Charlie Kaufman though, is that he writes awesome movies based on novels. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind was incredible (and true to the novel, I might add). Adaptation. turned a crappy book about flowers into an awesome movie about writer's block, sibling relationships, drugs, and masturbation. So, I guess in the latter case, his changing things around was a good thing (and yes, the movie is loosely based on reality; there really is a book about orchids by Susan Orlean that was optioned for a movie to be written by Charlie Kaufman...he just doesn't have a twin brother, and Susan Orlean didn't snort drugs with her subject).

JimmyB27
01-24-2009, 10:35 PM
I would probably view it in much the same way as I do films that don't follow the novels they are supposed to by other writers. Which is to say, I agree with Kevin, I would judge the film as a seperate entity; enjoy it if it were good, and complain, at length, if it were bad.
Either way, I'd sleep easy with the giant bag of cash and increased book sales a successful film would net me. :D

deserata
01-24-2009, 10:50 PM
I'm really not against seeing somebody else's interpretation or reimagination of my work... as long as it's in the right hands and they don't butcher the themes and characters.

If you move things around without enough consideration, the point will get lost. And then you're left with just another crappy movie adaptation.

Horserider
01-24-2009, 10:54 PM
I'd freak. I freak when the movie is nothing like the book when I'm NOT the author. I hate it when they cut things out for the sake of "length" and then add a whole bunch of stuff that's not in the book. It's like "Hey! You had time to add all this extra stuff in!"

eyeblink
01-24-2009, 11:37 PM
You should ask Pat Barker this one.

Her 1982 novel Union Street is a feminist piece about a group of six women in the North of England in the 1970s.

In 1990 it was filmed as Stanley & Iris. It was set in the USA and became the love story of widowed Iris (Jane Fonda) and illiterate Stanley (Robert De Niro).

Sunflash
01-25-2009, 12:01 AM
I would probably agree with J. K. Rolling, although I'm not a huge fan of her work (that will bite me in the butt one day). She says that readers should be able to envision the characters in books in their own since of view, not some silly actor/actress. When you read a book, a whole world opens up to you, and your imagination runs wild. I am working on a medieval (NOT fantasy) novel about a boy named Marr Brutika. If that ever became a hit movie, and I made millions only to mess up the plot, I would not complain to anybody meaningfully, for a million dollors is a lot of money for a novel. Although I would get upset and complain to myself, for the reasons I have listed. As I write my book, I am setting up the plot the way I want it, not some greedy old hag in the Hollywood business' idea of my story. I do not have a set plot and storyline yet, though I contimplate the ending when King Kahari dies, and gives his brother the title of king. Although I do agree with KTC, on how I would also view the movie by itself, not to my book in another sense of mind.

JamieFord
01-25-2009, 12:08 AM
My agent hooked me up with a film agent last year and our first conference call was basically to make sure I was okay selling my baby to the circus.

My film agent is incredible, but she wanted to make it very clear that once you sell film rights, you no longer have any creative control, over anything. I'm somewhat fine with it. I say somewhat because it seems like such a long-shot and such a strange thing for a newbie author to worry about anyway. It's one of those things I'll stress about if I'm fortunate enough to have that problem.

Palmfrond
01-25-2009, 01:23 AM
I'd take the money, but don't think I'd see the movie. It couldn't possibly match my mental image of the story, and would only make me feel my baby had been butchered.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 01:54 AM
I would refuse to have my book made into a film, fearing imminent Hollywoodised bookrape.

Unless I had a say in casting, in which case I would invite Messrs Farrell, Leto and Leto to my casting couch.

ETA: Having read through this thread properly, I have a question about book-butchery. Why do they (ooh, the mysterious 'they' again...) make books into films and then completely feck about with the original book which inspired the movie? Sure, some things have to be changed if they didn't translate well to the screen, which I can understand, but...take for instance a movie I saw once. I won't name it. But in the book, a man was kidnapped and ended up dead. In the film, he survived and it was a happy ever after. I asked the author why this had been done and she said it was because "Hollywood prefers a happy ending." Um...right. Like I've never seen any movies with sad endings before. I just think...why bother? Why not just make your own film, instead of basing it on a novel and then bastardising the whole plot?

Kate Thornton
01-25-2009, 01:59 AM
I think the single best film adaptation of a written work is The Man Who Would be King, a marvelous short story by Rudyard Kipling and a fabulous film by John Huston (1975, Sean Connery & Michael Caine)

As far as my own work, I would consider my story and the film to be two different animals entirely.

Cranky
01-25-2009, 02:00 AM
I'd be lying if I said it wouldn't bother me a little. With that said, I've always thought of movies and books as being different media, with different storytelling devices and needs.

So long as I didn't hate the movie on it's own merits, I'd be fine with it.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 02:00 AM
I would be so, so precious about the book I don't think I could do it.

Unless, as I said before...Farrell, casting couch, blah blah.

Kate Thornton
01-25-2009, 02:00 AM
I would refuse to have my book made into a film, fearing imminent Hollywoodised bookrape.

Unless I had a say in casting, in which case I would invite Messrs Farrell, Leto and Leto to my casting couch.

ETA: Having read through this thread properly, I have a question about book-butchery. Why do they (ooh, the mysterious 'they' again...) make books into films and then completely feck about with the original book which inspired the movie? Sure, some things have to be changed if they didn't translate well to the screen, which I can understand, but...take for instance a movie I saw once. I won't name it. But in the book, a man was kidnapped and ended up dead. In the film, he survived and it was a happy ever after. I asked the author why this had been done and she said it was because "Hollywood prefers a happy ending." Um...right. Like I've never seen any movies with sad endings before. I just think...why bother? Why not just make your own film, instead of basing it on a novel and then bastardising the whole plot?

Good question, SP - I've often wondered that too - unless the screenwriters/director just needed a jumping off place for ideas...

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 02:03 AM
I've just thought of another one. Spoilers ahead for "Dangerous Lady" by Martina Cole, which was made into a TV mini-series.





HIGHLIGHT TO VIEW SPOILER
In the book, she did a bunk in the end, went to live in Spain, I think, with the loot and her policeman lover.

On TV, he turned her in and she was seen to be punished. I felt like I was being whacked over the head with the 'crime doesn't pay' stick. Like ooh, we can't be seen to condone crime, can we?!
END SPOILER

kuwisdelu
01-25-2009, 02:05 AM
I would try to view the movie on its own merits and judge it on how it stands by itself. I wouldn't care...if I thought the movie was good.

I agree with this. If I like it as a movie, I won't care what they change. I'll probably even tell fans to "get over it." It's a different medium. You can't expect everything to be the same.

If they change it and I hate the movie, too, I'd be pissed.

semilargeintestine
01-25-2009, 02:10 AM
How about the latest adaptation of I Am Legend? The general plot is there, but so many things have been changed that it might as well be a different story. Just because I have to rant, I am going to spoil it.

Spoiler (highlight to read):

Will Smith plays the main character. In the book, he is an average white guy with long blond hair (I think it's long); he is also not a man of higher education. In the movie, however, he is an athletic black guy who is not only a scientist, but the scientist responsible for finding a cure.

In the book, his wife catches the disease and he is forced to put her in the fire pit. In the movie, his wife and kid are killed in a helicopter crash while attempting to flee the city. The dog is theirs, and grows up with him. In the book, he finds the dog.

In the book, the woman he meets is alone, and he finds her in a field. She turns out to be a spy for a group of hybrids that he has been unwittingly killing. They capture him and sentence him to public execution. In the movie, she saves him from certain death, and he houses her and her son. They eventually are overrun by the infected, and he sacrifices himself to let them escape to the secret colony of survivors that exists only in the movie.

End of spoiler.

How ridiculous is that? I enjoyed the movie, but it bothered me that they changed so much. It was so great the way it was written.

StevenJ
01-25-2009, 02:12 AM
Let's face it, folks - no-one will ever make my rubbishy books into movies.
There's more chance of my cat becoming an astronaut. :D

fullbookjacket
01-25-2009, 02:20 AM
I think I would be resigned to the fact that there would be changes--significant changes--going from novel to movie form. I could live with that. However, I'd be livid if they turned the novel inside out, turned adult characters into kids, tossed out themes, etc. If the novel was attractive enough as a story to be made into a movie, why destroy everything and start over? Is it an ego thing with Hollywood?

kuwisdelu
01-25-2009, 02:24 AM
How about the latest adaptation of I Am Legend? The general plot is there, but so many things have been changed that it might as well be a different story. Just because I have to rant, I am going to spoil it.

How ridiculous is that? I enjoyed the movie, but it bothered me that they changed so much. It was so great the way it was written.

Pretty ridiculous. But after trying the book, I thought the movie was much better. I found the book kind of ridiculous itself.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 02:25 AM
I've never seen I Am Legend, but Omega Man is one of my favourite fillums.

semilargeintestine
01-25-2009, 02:30 AM
Yeah, Omega Man is awesome. I Am Legend (the Will Smith one) is good too. If they did that to my book, I wouldn't be angry, since the movie is good; however, I'd be very confused about why they changed so many things for seemingly no reason other than to have something else there.

WriteKnight
01-25-2009, 02:44 AM
Marketing has a lot to do with it - the reason they acquire the rights in the first place. If it's a known author/commodity - then it comes with a certain cachet, built in audience and name recognitions.

If its just a really really good but obscure story, its easier (and cheaper in the long run) to buy the rights, and then make the changes you want - instead of 'stealing' the idea.

Saint Fool
01-25-2009, 03:30 AM
If I was ever so lucky, I'd take the money and run. There are so many variables in movies: running time, budget, intended target audience, how the "star" perceives his character, producers who "know" what sells, etc. etc., it's amazing that some come out as close to the original as they do.

I remember seeing Kubrick's The Shining in the movie theater. Half of the full-house (including me and my best friend's date) had read the book and were not happy campers. Apparently, the rest of the audience (including my date and my best friend) had not read it and loved it.

I always assume that the movie adaptation will be different than the book and adjust my expectations. But then I remember how true the adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird was .... sigh.

willietheshakes
01-25-2009, 04:16 AM
I think the single best film adaptation of a written work is The Man Who Would be King, a marvelous short story by Rudyard Kipling and a fabulous film by John Huston (1975, Sean Connery & Michael Caine)


Interesting.

Especially as I think the single best adaptation would have to be The Dead, a marvelous short story by James Joyced and a fabulous film by (drum roll...) John Huston.

Samantha's_Song
01-25-2009, 04:17 AM
That's my novel buggered if it's ever turned into a film then. Oh wait, I'd be selling it to a French film maker, so I don't have to worry about sappy law-abiding endings.

Stephen King's Cujo, the kid dies of dehydration etc in the book. Oh, he lives in the end of the film... it's a horror film for f***'s sake! :D


HIGHLIGHT TO VIEW SPOILER
In the book, she did a bunk in the end, went to live in Spain, I think, with the loot and her policeman lover.

On TV, he turned her in and she was seen to be punished. I felt like I was being whacked over the head with the 'crime doesn't pay' stick. Like ooh, we can't be seen to condone crime, can we?!
END SPOILER

Samantha's_Song
01-25-2009, 04:22 AM
They make Dan Brown's drivel into films, so we all stand a good chance! :D


Let's face it, folks - no-one will ever make my rubbishy books into movies.
There's more chance of my cat becoming an astronaut. :D


Close encounters of the furred kind :tongue

BenPanced
01-25-2009, 04:24 AM
I'll worry about it if an offer's actually made. Until then, I've got some work to do...

Kate Thornton
01-25-2009, 04:48 AM
Interesting.

Especially as I think the single best adaptation would have to be The Dead, a marvelous short story by James Joyced and a fabulous film by (drum roll...) John Huston.

Okay - that's a good one, too - good enough to tie, for me. John Huston understood both stories.

ChaosTitan
01-25-2009, 04:49 AM
This is a hypothetical I don't think I can answer. I have no idea how I'd react, because "much different" doesn't necessarily mean it's bad. Just changed. And let's face it--films as a storytelling medium are so vastly different from novels that adapting novels REQUIRES changes. Whether they are small changes or huge changes, changes must be made.

My plots tend to be pretty tight, so an adaptation would have to lose quite a lot of story (and possibly characters) in order to fit into a two-hour running time. Until I actually saw the Much Different Movie Version, I couldn't say how I'd feel, really. But I know I'd have more money for the experience, plus a bump in novel sales with the movie tie-in re-release. :D

nighttimer
01-25-2009, 04:58 AM
Book -- my vision.
Movie -- the director's vision.

No reason for me to assume that we'll see things the same way. I may not like the changes to my plot/characters/setting/etc, but I'm the one who voluntarily sold them to someone else. I'll either get over it or never sell movie-rights again.

Bloody well right.

If you write the book and they write you a check and you cash the check they are under no obligation to make a movie that's a frame-by-frame "faithful" adaptation.

John Grisham wasn't happy with the changes made to The Pelican Brief, but he didn't have the power to change it, so he had to suck on it. I'm sure he didn't give the money back though.

Books and films can go together like peanut butter and jelly or like peanut butter and mayonnaise.

:cry:

Pagey's_Girl
01-25-2009, 05:28 AM
I wouldn't be happy about it, but on the other hand, if it got people to read more of my stuff, it would all be good...

Claudia Gray
01-25-2009, 05:50 AM
Cash my check.

Seriously, you sell it, you surrender the rights -- unless you have the kind of J.K. Rowling-clout that would allow you to have input, and probably you don't. I might find it very weird, but I would know what I was getting into.

Darzian
01-25-2009, 05:56 AM
Darzian:

Dumbledore is different in the movies (post-Richard Harris) because Michael Gambon didn't read the books. He bases Dumbledore off of his interpretation of the script, not on Rowling's character.

I'm not a fan of Harry Potter. But I really enjoy Gambon's Dumbledore so much better than the book's Dumbledore. Nevertheless, as far as the book's character goes, you couldn't get someone closer than Richard Harris... gawd, he was awesome... ever see Count of Monte Cristo?

Omg, Harris was the perfect fit! But Gambon, IMO, wasn't. Very different characteristics which more or less ruined every Dumbledore scene for me.

Golden Compass: I liked the book though I thought it could be shortened. But the removal of the ending is the worst mistake EVER.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 05:58 AM
Harris was great in Gladiator too. But then everything about that movie was golden.

semilargeintestine
01-25-2009, 06:03 AM
Gladiator. Best. Movie. Ever.

I would totally go gay for Russell Crowe.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 06:04 AM
I would totally go straight for Joaquin. Oh wait - I am!* That's handy! :D





*Most of the time.

semilargeintestine
01-25-2009, 06:06 AM
Right on sistuh.

brutus
01-25-2009, 06:08 AM
m

scarletpeaches
01-25-2009, 06:09 AM
Sell out!

:D

Wouldn't you feel pissed, though? That they'd bought your story and then put out something that wasn't your story? Or am I just precious about this sort of thing?

Don't answer that.

gypsyscarlett
01-25-2009, 06:19 AM
The worst one to me was Watchers by Dean Koontz. I love the book. I think it's his best work. So imagine my joy when while reading the book I found there was a movie based on the book. I ordered it through Amazon.
Imagine my frustration when I saw what had been done to the story! Every detail was changed except the most basic element. The MC had been changed from an ex marine to a high school kid! The love of his life in the book had become his mother!

Oh gawd. There aren't enough words to describe how wrong that is. (shudder) And sort of funny in a horrid way.

Me? As a reader, I can't stand when filmmakers change novels. I understand the need to cut things out, tweak things here and there. Movies are a different medium and they usually only have two hours.

But there's a big difference between cutting things, deciding you'll focus on this aspect of the novel and leave out such and such subplots, and actually changing the heart of a novel. When females become males, adult men become children, when sad endings become happy or vice versa... I wonder why the hell they didn't just use an original screenplay.

So, yeah. I'd also be cursing to the bank.

added: Of course, there are exceptions. If the film was a beautiful piece of art in itself (not just a moneymaker) then I'd probably be forgiving.

mmorsepfd
01-25-2009, 07:00 AM
I wrote a book that was published in 2007. A lot of people thought it would make a good movie so I decided to do a screenplay adaption. What started as a movie version of the book ended up barely resembling the original. If I can't trust myself, who can I trust?

The screenplay is being considered by a independent filmmaker who loved the story. It's a longshot, but you never know! I can only imagine if it does get made what the end result will be.

willietheshakes
01-25-2009, 09:29 AM
Sell out!

:D

Wouldn't you feel pissed, though? That they'd bought your story and then put out something that wasn't your story? Or am I just precious about this sort of thing?

Don't answer that.

You're just being precious...

Oh... Wait... Nevermind.

frimble3
01-25-2009, 11:33 AM
Marketing has a lot to do with it - the reason they acquire the rights in the first place. If it's a known author/commodity - then it comes with a certain cachet, built in audience and name recognitions.

If its just a really really good but obscure story, its easier (and cheaper in the long run) to buy the rights, and then make the changes you want - instead of 'stealing' the idea.

Or, what if it's a good basic idea that the scriptwriter is already using. But a book comes out using enough of the same idea that the writer might claim plagiarism when he sees the movie? Simpler to pay him off, use the title, and continue with the movie they were planning.
After all, this is the industry that won't accept unagented submissions for fear of being accused of 'stealing ideas'. And it wouldn't do to call it 'hush money', for fear of treading on sensitive egos, so people are left wondering what happened?

Jenan Mac
01-25-2009, 08:01 PM
I see movie deals as a way to finance writing. I don't expect the movie to be good. It'd be an unexpected surprise if it turns out to be a decent adaptation.

If it does turn out to be good, I hope they make nifty toys for it too. Because action figures of my story characters would be fun.


Ooh, action figures! And t-shirts, and posters, and...yeah, they could bastardize the hell out of the novel. I'd use the money to live on, and write a new one, with new characters. I'm too old and broke to have an artistic temperament.

SDBmania
01-26-2009, 02:38 AM
For me, I wouldn't care, because right now I'm poor and need money. If it would help me get into the spotlight for a while and boost my career I would be ok with it. Of course, I am one of those people who would prefer the film to be as close as possible to my book. I think if I was a successful author then it would bother me more. I would make a big stink out of it.

It also sort of depends on the book too. I feel that if you are going to make a movie based on the book, then you should make a good attempt to recreate the book on screen. But, it's never going to be perfect.

Witanowski
01-27-2009, 08:05 PM
I wouldn't mind changes to the story, invented scenes, expanded dialouge - because what works on paper doesn't always translate to film. I've definitely looked at my own work and thought: "Now, if this was a movie..." But it's not a movie. If it had been, I would writing a screenplay, not a novel.

On the other hand, what I can't stand is when there's an adaptation that goes way beyond the necessary changes and starts tinkering with basic facts about the world, or one that cuts out or changes so much material that you lose just about everything that made the book great: that god awful version of Earthsea that was on the Sci-Fi Channel several years back springs to mind.

eveningstar
01-28-2009, 12:49 AM
A book is a book. A film is a film. The best adaptations keep that in mind.

In an ideal world I'd hope for something along the lines of what Christopher Nolan did with Christopher Priest's The Prestige. Book & film are two very different animals, but each excellent in their own right.

The moral of this post is try to make sure Christopher Nolan adapts & directs your book.

WriteKnight
01-28-2009, 12:51 AM
I think everything written by Heinlein that has been translated to screen has been hopelessly butchered. STARSHIP TROOPERS is probably the best (worst) example of simply buying the Title and the fame of the Author's name associated with it, and then throwing crap at the screen.

DeleyanLee
01-28-2009, 01:12 AM
Personally, I agree with the attitude contributed to Tolkien on the subject:

Give me lots and lots of money, and I walk away from it. Do what you will.

Give me a pittance and full creative control.

Though, honestly, I don't want any creative control on a movie, because I know nothing of screenwriting, movie-making or any of that stuff and have zero interest in learning about it for it to do well. I know that book and movie are two different mediums and some stories translate cleanly and others don't. So give me tons and tons of money and do what you like.

Though I'd probably put a pass onto the set into the contract, just 'cause it would make my kids jealous as all get out. ;)

Plot Device
01-28-2009, 01:25 AM
I have NOT read through this entire thread. So I don't know if I am about to duplicate someoe else's answer. But my answer has three parts to it.

FIRST, I am a screenwriter, so when I make that rare forray into novel writing, I will usually be writing in a very cinematic manner to begin with. So the leap from novel to screen for any novel I would write SHOULDN'T be too terribly difficult.

SECOND, I have a pretty fierce grasp of the contraints of a movie, and so I realize that loads of stuff in any given novel needs to get cut for time, and I also realize that loads of stuff likewise needs to get recannoitered to make things more movie-ish.

THIRD, if I ever publish one of my novels, I am going to do my very darndest to retain the film rights to it. And then if Hollywood comes knocking, I will wave the already-written screenplay under their noses with a price tag firmly attached.

Sean D. Schaffer
01-28-2009, 03:34 AM
Snipped...

Let's say your book is made into a big-budget movie, by which I don't mean Vanity Productions or some other company that ends up not producing anything at all. We can even say the movie has Big Stars in it and was directed by A Big Name Director. We can also go further to say that the movie was a Big Hit and further propelled sales of your book a millionfold.

But the film they made was somewhat different than your book. It was not like Harry Potter or Jason Bourne. They kept your characters and basic story, but many alterations were made for the sake of film. The MC is diametrically opposite than what you conceived. The basic themes are gone. The plot goes differently. Even the ending has been changed into a "Hollywood ending" suitable for the big screen.

What is your reaction as author?


My reaction as author would depend upon the quality of the movie. If I had written Eragon, I would likely be very upset. If I had written 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, I would likely have been much happier.

black ink
01-28-2009, 10:06 PM
I once heard an interview with the author of the Lemony Snicket books. He was asked what he thought about the movie version of his book and he made some snide comment about not liking it that left me with a very sour impression. I think it's fine to complain privately, but publicly just seems very, I don't know. . . sour grapes? Or maybe I just got that impression because the movie flopped and it seemed like he was trying to distance himself, whereas, if it had been a huge success, he probably would have praised it, despite its differences from the book.

So for me, I'd cash my big fat check and grumble privately. If asked publicly, I'd really try to be diplomatic, so as not to burn any movie-making, money-earning bridges in the future.

dclary
01-28-2009, 10:11 PM
My friend Ryne Pearson wrote a book called Mercury Rising that was about a young autistic man, that was eventually made into a Bruce Willis movie that has almost nothing in common with the book, except someone with autism solves a government code in it.

He says whenever it comes on USA or TNT, he'll watch it up until the point the credits "Story by Ryne Pearson" come up, then he changes the channel, and makes a note to check with his agent about how the residuals are doing the next morning.

dclary
01-28-2009, 10:13 PM
And in his collection of essays and short stories, Frank Herbert once expressed deep satisfaction at the Dune movie, saying that even though it wasn't the same as his book, it shared the same spirit, and simply told a different version of the same story.

firedrake
01-28-2009, 10:15 PM
Years and years ago, when I was working at a radio station, I interviewed Colleen McCullough when she was doing a promotional tour for The Thorn Birds. She mentioned the television adaptation in passing and she was NOT impressed! Having seen it, neither was I!

Quossum
02-01-2009, 08:34 AM
Film and print are very different mediums. A Very Good Book might make a Very Bad Movie unless certain changes are made, and were my book chosen for being made into a movie, I would expect such changes to be made and be content with it. Sure, some changes seem silly and unnecessary (Reepicheep being given the Antonio Banderas treatment in Prince Caspian, anyone? Please!), but so long as the basic spirit is there, I think I could live with it.

However, and more to address the OP, yes, some movie adaptations go 'way too far, and don't keep in the "spirit" of the author's work at all. As the author in question, THAT would cause me to bite my nails horribly, though I'd probably do it on the way to the bank, as others have mentioned. But hey, it would inevitably mean more sales of my book. I hadn't read I Am Legend until this most recent movie with Will Smith came out. I specifically bought it in the book store, complete with a Will Smith screenshot on the cover, because I was curious after hearing comments that "the book is SO different!" I would never have purchased it otherwise, and the book contained a lot of other short stories by the author which I liked.

--Q

blacbird
02-01-2009, 10:55 AM
I'd get really pissed off, and take about $100 of my movie option money and go down to a local bar and drink three or four of the most expensive double-shots of single-malt Scotch whiskies they had, and try to get over it.

caw

Donkey
02-01-2009, 11:01 AM
My friend Ryne Pearson wrote a book called Mercury Rising that was about a young autistic man, that was eventually made into a Bruce Willis movie that has almost nothing in common with the book, except someone with autism solves a government code in it.

He says whenever it comes on USA or TNT, he'll watch it up until the point the credits "Story by Ryne Pearson" come up, then he changes the channel, and makes a note to check with his agent about how the residuals are doing the next morning.


Good example. Excellent book, as was everything I read by Ryne Douglas Pearson. So-so movie. Why did he stop writing?

Cassiopeia
02-01-2009, 11:08 AM
I'd say, "Well paint me happy, I got paid!"

Nakhlasmoke
02-01-2009, 11:30 AM
Seeing as how I can't imagine anything of mine being Hollywood friendly, I doubt it's an issue that will ever come up.

BUT, let's just say it does. I'll probably hate everything they do to my characters - especially since I'm pretty certain they'll transplant the south african story to new york or something, to make it more commercial.

But I also hate being poor, and a movie deal could finance many more years of writing.

So yeah, add me to the list of people who would bitch privately, smile in public, and take the cash.

Samantha's_Song
02-01-2009, 12:38 PM
Yeah, mine neither: My stories are always set in France, the French are always the good guys, and so are the rest of us Europeans :D

My stories are more like Baise moi than happy Hollywood. :P


Seeing as how I can't imagine anything of mine being Hollywood friendly, I doubt it's an issue that will ever come up.

foonting
02-01-2009, 01:00 PM
I see movie deals as a way to finance writing. I don't expect the movie to be good. It'd be an unexpected surprise if it turns out to be a decent adaptation.

If it does turn out to be good, I hope they make nifty toys for it too. Because action figures of my story characters would be fun.

Yay....I'd go for the action figures stuff too!
Seriously though, I'd try and push for as much creative control over the screenplay as possible, but laugh all the way to the bank whatever happened.
If you are a best selling author I don't think film adaptations matter a bit to your core fans...the film is seen as an extension of the book like the Harry potter series: if they had screwed up the films, I don't think it would have harmed book sales or Rowling's popularity.

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 05:52 PM
My stories are more like Baise moi than happy Hollywood.

Blimey! :D

I just know that I'd either be a Victim of Hollywood, or my (filmed) novella would be one of those cheapo British straight-to-dvd efforts (think Dr Who before CGI...or after it, in fact...). So, I anticipate my made-for-tv movie would be something like this:

Roll the credits...

Salvatore House of Horror and General Creepy Stuff
Directed by Guy Ritchie
Starring Danny Dyer as Cristian Salazar
Myleene Klass as Aurelia Salazar
Lee Evans as Michael Stroud
Meryl Streep as Stroud's girlfriend
Howard from the Halifax Building Society ads as Beatriz

Blurb:
'This year...tough cop Michael Stroud is accused of a crime he didn't commit. Using his Shaolin kung-fu, he breaks out of Chipping Sodbury Open Prison and heads for Salvatore House, a lonely...house on the Yorkshire moors in the middle of Dubai. Vampires assail him from every direction, leaving Stroud and his lover Meryl Streep at the mercy of notorious Cockney drug dealer and DJ Cristian Salazar...'

scarletpeaches
02-01-2009, 05:55 PM
Shove Colin Farrell in there somewhere and I'd pay to see that at my local Odeon!

firedrake
02-01-2009, 05:58 PM
Blimey! :D

I just know that I'd either be a Victim of Hollywood, or my (filmed) novella would be one of those cheapo British straight-to-dvd efforts (think Dr Who before CGI...or after it, in fact...). So, I anticipate my made-for-tv movie would be something like this:

Roll the credits...

Salvatore House of Horror and General Creepy Stuff
Directed by Guy Ritchie
Starring Danny Dyer as Cristian Salazar
Myleene Klass as Aurelia Salazar
Lee Evans as Michael Stroud
Meryl Streep as Stroud's girlfriend
Howard from the Halifax Building Society ads as Beatriz

Blurb:
'This year...tough cop Michael Stroud is accused of a crime he didn't commit. Using his Shaolin kung-fu, he breaks out of Chipping Sodbury Open Prison and heads for Salvatore House, a lonely...house on the Yorkshire moors in the middle of Dubai. Vampires assail him from every direction, leaving Stroud and his lover Meryl Streep at the mercy of notorious Cockney drug dealer and DJ Cristian Salazar...'

:e2point:

I'm wiping coffee off my monitor.

Myleeen Klaas! ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!! the Ego has landed.

I have high hopes for a BBC dramatisation of mine. After all, it's set during WW1 and it's not like their costume department hasn't got all the gear.

*wakes up*

scarletpeaches
02-01-2009, 06:00 PM
I don't think I've got a hope in hell of the BBC screening my WIP. Unless it was strictly post-watershed and hella-watered down.

It's closer to Channel 4's tastes...

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 06:01 PM
Shove Colin Farrell in there somewhere and I'd pay to see that at my local Odeon!


I don't think the budget would extend that far, chief, especially after I made Winona Ryder my PA.

firedrake
02-01-2009, 06:02 PM
I don't think I've got a hope in hell of the BBC screening my WIP. Unless it was strictly post-watershed and hella-watered down.

It's closer to Channel 4's tastes...

I've been away from England for 7 years now, so I've lost track of all the channels. Does Channel 4 still do the edgy stuff these days?

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 06:08 PM
Does Channel 4 still do the edgy stuff these days?


Yes, even Countdown features swearing now. :D
Seriously, I don't know if C4 does' edgy' any more, as the wind's blown my tv aeriel all over the shop so I can't get terrestrial tv at the moment; I'm stuck watching the likes of Sky3 aka the shark documentary channel.

scarletpeaches
02-01-2009, 06:10 PM
I don't think the budget would extend that far, chief, especially after I made Winona Ryder my PA.

Jared Leto then; he needs the money from what I hear.


I've been away from England for 7 years now, so I've lost track of all the channels. Does Channel 4 still do the edgy stuff these days?

I've been away from England for 23 years. I live in Scotland.

But yes. Channel Four still does swearing, light drug-taking and random acts of homosexuality, so my book should be good for them.

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 06:13 PM
But yes. Channel Four still does swearing, light drug-taking and random acts of homosexuality, so my book should be good for them.


Then there's E4, the channel famous for Hollyoaks and Skins, both of which feature the worst acting known to man. However, I still find myself watching these shows which arguably proves that I'm a closet masochist.

scarletpeaches
02-01-2009, 06:18 PM
Some of my characters are pretty enough to be on Hollyoaks.

They swear a lot and nail anything that moves, so they probably qualify for Skins too. I've never seen it, but my dad watches it. I'm ashamed of him.

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 06:25 PM
Skins is just terrible, Mrs Leto - any show that features cameo appearances by so-called stars as a mainstay of its appeal has lost it's raison d'Ítre, in my opinion.

scarletpeaches
02-01-2009, 06:29 PM
Bearing in mind the highlight of my dad's existence is when I go to visit him - or at least I tell myself so - that probably says a lot about how easily entertained he is.

I should probably refrain from inviting him to the premiere of my novel's fillum-isation. The scantily-clad grizzly bears and dwarves on stilts would shock him into a diabetic coma.

In a freakish incident of thread rerailment, I have to say if there were no scantily-clad grizzly bears or dwarves on stilts in the movie of my WIP, I would force myself to cope with that.

I'd manage, because they don't even feature in the first draft.

firedrake
02-01-2009, 06:32 PM
Skins is just terrible, Mrs Leto - any show that features cameo appearances by so-called stars as a mainstay of its appeal has lost it's raison d'Ítre, in my opinion.

Skins is touted by BBC America as an edgy, critically acclaimed drama. Then, compared to most of the crap that BBC America shows, I guess it could be. I haven't seen it, I only watch the Beeb for the news, Dr. Who and Torchwood. BBCA bears no resemblance to proper, grown-up BBC.

StevenJ
02-01-2009, 06:38 PM
scantily-clad grizzly bears and dwarves on stilts

:roll:

Samantha's_Song
02-02-2009, 12:44 AM
SP, FD and Steve... Get yourselves a foreign satellite dish; you don't have to pay any subscriptions to anything, not like rip-off Sjy. The French and German channels will definitely show you edgy. Hell, they might even pay you all to turn your novels into films and you won't have to leave anything out :D

MrWrite
02-02-2009, 12:48 AM
Skins is touted by BBC America as an edgy, critically acclaimed drama. Then, compared to most of the crap that BBC America shows, I guess it could be. I haven't seen it, I only watch the Beeb for the news, Dr. Who and Torchwood. BBCA bears no resemblance to proper, grown-up BBC.

I agree! The British BBC has tons of great dramas and documentaries. Where are all these great shows on BBC America? Most of the time they just show the most godawful shows like what not to wear and that what's in the attic show or whatever it's called. And where are all the great brit comedies?

StevenJ
02-02-2009, 12:55 AM
Honestly, the BBC has lost its way in recent years, I think, and rather relies on past glories in that respect.

Many of the dramas & documentaries mentioned above can be seen on Youtube. :)

Romantic Heretic
02-02-2009, 04:29 PM
In the Book Club forum, I posted about how different the Forrest Gump movie was compared to the book. About the only thing that was the same was the concept. And the movie was a hit. Without the movie, the book was probably doomed to obscurity. (Judging by the copyright page, I believe the book was self-published at first.)

Stephen King is reported to have disliked Kubrick's version of The Shining, since the director left out the basic themes that were present in the book. Meanwhile, the movie became a horror classic. Of course, without King's novel, there would never have been a film like it.

Other movies made from novels are similar in theme, setting, and characters but the plots and situations have been altered. MASH comes to mind.

In other cases, movie adaptations have been made that almost mirror the books. The Jason Bourne movies are an example. The Harry Potter movies are almost identical to the books except they left out subplots and parts of the story to condense them into the two-hour timeframe. The characters and themes were left intact.

Which brings me to my question.

Let's say your book is made into a big-budget movie, by which I don't mean Vanity Productions or some other company that ends up not producing anything at all. We can even say the movie has Big Stars in it and was directed by A Big Name Director. We can also go further to say that the movie was a Big Hit and further propelled sales of your book a millionfold.

But the film they made was somewhat different than your book. It was not like Harry Potter or Jason Bourne. They kept your characters and basic story, but many alterations were made for the sake of film. The MC is diametrically opposite than what you conceived. The basic themes are gone. The plot goes differently. Even the ending has been changed into a "Hollywood ending" suitable for the big screen.

What is your reaction as author?

I'd shrug my shoulders and count my money. :D

Chauchat Butterfly
02-02-2009, 07:32 PM
Honestly I wouldn't mind if the movie version was wildly different. I think it'd be interesting to see someone else's interpretaion of my idea, as long as I got paid (and the movie didn't suck). In fact, if I were to write and direct screenplay versions of my novels, they'd probably be all full reimaginings. There are a lot of things you can do on film that you can't do on paper. For instance: the movie version of my current WIP would be something akin to The Holy Mountain (but then it would make no money and the only people who would see it are the types the novel aims to depict).

C.bronco
02-02-2009, 07:37 PM
In the Book Club forum, I posted about how different the Forrest Gump movie was compared to the book. About the only thing that was the same was the concept. And the movie was a hit. Without the movie, the book was probably doomed to obscurity. (Judging by the copyright page, I believe the book was self-published at first.)

Stephen King is reported to have disliked Kubrick's version of The Shining, since the director left out the basic themes that were present in the book. Meanwhile, the movie became a horror classic. Of course, without King's novel, there would never have been a film like it.

Other movies made from novels are similar in theme, setting, and characters but the plots and situations have been altered. MASH comes to mind.

In other cases, movie adaptations have been made that almost mirror the books. The Jason Bourne movies are an example. The Harry Potter movies are almost identical to the books except they left out subplots and parts of the story to condense them into the two-hour timeframe. The characters and themes were left intact.

Which brings me to my question.

Let's say your book is made into a big-budget movie, by which I don't mean Vanity Productions or some other company that ends up not producing anything at all. We can even say the movie has Big Stars in it and was directed by A Big Name Director. We can also go further to say that the movie was a Big Hit and further propelled sales of your book a millionfold.

But the film they made was somewhat different than your book. It was not like Harry Potter or Jason Bourne. They kept your characters and basic story, but many alterations were made for the sake of film. The MC is diametrically opposite than what you conceived. The basic themes are gone. The plot goes differently. Even the ending has been changed into a "Hollywood ending" suitable for the big screen.

What is your reaction as author?
If it is drastically different, I will cry, cry, cry like a little girl untl I recieve the royalty check. Then I will come to terms with the changes.

If there are some modifications made, I won't mind.

Atlantis
02-03-2009, 02:51 AM
I would probably be so awe struck to see my characters on the screen and my name in the credits I could probably forgive any changes done to the story. I would be a litle tiffed if some major things were changed but what can I do about it? Writers have nothing to do with the movie productions of their books most of the time. If we're lucky we might be allowed to walk around the set.

Kaiser-Kun
02-03-2009, 05:14 AM
I'd try to get involved with the process as a consultant, but I'd generally trust the director and producers made those changes for the best rea$ons. Plus, I'd ask for them to send me a sample of every merchandise they make of it, in order to have Anara, Vynen and Rophen action figures (with kung-fu grip!) atop my desk.

mscelina
02-03-2009, 05:23 AM
The amount of my tears would have a direct link to the amount of my check. For example, a six or seven figure check? Not so many tears. You know why?

Because if they'll pay that much for the rights, then I'd be smart enough to negotiate final say over the script if not writing the script to start off with.

Problem solved. Bank.

Lyra Jean
02-03-2009, 12:41 PM
Going to the bank. I would ask for a spot on the red carpet for opening night. Yeah!

Kaiser-Kun
02-03-2009, 06:16 PM
I admit I'd actually like the movie to be different just to see if there are any angry fans protesting they ruined my book...