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Shadow_Ferret
01-06-2009, 11:03 PM
Has anyone ever participated in one of these? I'm just curious because I just heard about one on the radio for adults with ADHD who are married and have kids that fall into my kids' age groups.

This is their website (http://www.rogershospital.org/trials.php). And I think that pic is one of Inky's old avvies. :)

cray
01-06-2009, 11:05 PM
i've been involved in clinical research since 1995ish, ferret.
pm me.

Kitty Pryde
01-06-2009, 11:52 PM
One thing to keep in mind is that doctors/researchers don't recruit people for the trial to HELP those people with their medical problems. They recruit people to test the effects and side effects of experimental treatments in the hopes that those treatments will prove effective and one day help OTHER people. Trial participants MAY be helped, but that isn't the goal of the study.

Another thing to consider is that in many trials, half the patients may get an experimental treatment, and the other half may get a placebo (ie no treatment at all), but the patients don't know if they are being treated or not. Something to consider if you were to, for example, quit taking your own meds in hopes of trying new different ones.

If you just want some extra bucks, then right on! But sometimes things go completely tits-up (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TGN1412#Clinical_trials), so consider the potential risks and benefits!

smoothseas
01-07-2009, 12:35 AM
One thing to keep in mind is that doctors/researchers don't recruit people for the trial to HELP those people with their medical problems. They recruit people to test the effects and side effects of experimental treatments in the hopes that those treatments will prove effective and one day help OTHER people. Trial participants MAY be helped, but that isn't the goal of the study.

Another thing to consider is that in many trials, half the patients may get an experimental treatment, and the other half may get a placebo (ie no treatment at all), but the patients don't know if they are being treated or not. Something to consider if you were to, for example, quit taking your own meds in hopes of trying new different ones.

If you just want some extra bucks, then right on! But sometimes things go completely tits-up (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TGN1412#Clinical_trials), so consider the potential risks and benefits!


Thatís just about what I was thinking when I originally read this post. Meant to come back and comment, but KP did it first.

Often times the compensation is NOT worth the potential risk.

Shadow_Ferret
01-07-2009, 12:41 AM
The only compensation I was thinking (wasn't even aware I might get paid) was that I might have a little focus in my life.

smoothseas
01-07-2009, 01:34 AM
The only compensation I was thinking (wasn't even aware I might get paid) was that I might have a little focus in my life.


Best case scenario is, that it does provide some focus.

OTH, it can engender a whole host of negative ramifications.

Problem is, you're a guinea pig. You (usually) sign waivers.

Ultimately, you take their money and you take your chances.

You might call, just to satisfy your own curiosity.

veinglory
01-07-2009, 01:38 AM
I have taken part in clinical studies for no pay, because I want to contribute to the development of effective treatments. There should be a full explanation fo any potential risks and you can back out at any time.

TerzaRima
01-07-2009, 01:44 AM
SF, they may not even be testing an experimental treatment--they may be just gathering information about adults with ADHD and their children. For example, the study may involve paper and pencil tests of neuropsychological function, or a test which involves how rapidly you click a button after seeing a light flash on the screen (CPT testing) or tests of vision. I'd say it's actually less likely that a study of both adults and children would involved drug testing.

Shadow_Ferret
01-07-2009, 01:50 AM
SF, they may not even be testing an experimental treatment--they may be just gathering information about adults with ADHD and their children. For example, the study may involve paper and pencil tests of neuropsychological function, or a test which involves how rapidly you click a button after seeing a light flash on the screen (CPT testing) or tests of vision. I'd say it's actually less likely that a study of both adults and children would involved drug testing.
Maybe I didn't explain that. It's for adult's with ADHD who have a spouse and have a child between ages 6 and 16. The adult with ADHD is the one who they want, no one else. That family stuff is just a criteria.

veinglory
01-07-2009, 02:42 AM
Yes, but they must specify that for a reason which is unlikely to be medical. It suggests they want to survey people about their experiences in their family.

Shadow_Ferret
01-07-2009, 08:09 AM
I reheard the commercial and they want to test an FDA approved drug.

The more I think about it, the more I wonder, I've lived with ADHD for 51 years. Do I really want to screw around with my personality now?

Thanks for all the help. I really do appreciate the answers and I appreciate you letting me use you to make my mind up. :)

Stlight
01-07-2009, 10:03 AM
They also may still be seeing what the side effects are. It takes awhile to find out what they all are.