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Devil Ledbetter
01-01-2009, 02:22 AM
We are getting a puppy. The only thing holding us up is deciding what kind of dog to get. It turns out to be more complicated than I initially thought. I know we have a lot of "dog" people here, and I value your experience, expertise, wisdom and just plain old unvarnished opinions.

Here's our situation: We have a large house, a fenced yard and a mature cat (who is never going to forgive me). Our kids are 11 and 7, and just dying to get a puppy. DH and I work full time, but I come home for lunch (it's only 7 minutes from work) and DD is home by 2:45 in the afternoon. I usually take 5-mile walks and want a dog that can join me.

I like dogs that are calm, affable and intelligent. I dislike neediness, nervousness and excessive barking. I'm not crazy about very large dogs - I like small to midsize. I'm completely undecided on whether to get a breed dog or a shelter dog. My daughter wants a puggle, but I'm not convinced that the hybrid craze is all it's cracked up to be.

What are some good, family dogs?

Haggis
01-01-2009, 02:35 AM
A Chihuahua.

Oh, okay. Never mind.

Try a Golden Retriever. About the sweetest dog there is.

Plot Device
01-01-2009, 02:38 AM
Try a Golden Retriever. About the sweetest dog there is.

Ditto. And if you train them early, you can trim back their proclivity to bark (and bark and bark).

Hair and dander MIGHT be a problem with this breed. But this is a very sweet lovable dog, pretty intelligent, loves a good walk, loves the kiddies, loves to be petted and hugged, knows when to leave you alone, and it can handle a medium-sized yard.

Silver King
01-01-2009, 02:45 AM
We have a Min-Pin that's very smart, affable, even-tempered, is great with children and loving to a fault.

She's on the small side, about twelve pounds. We got her when she was only a few weeks old, and it took no time at all to train her. She was house broken within a couple of days. The only problem I had with her was during the first year (she's seven now), when she would bolt when given the chance. She never ran far, but it was a bitch trying to catch her, as she's very fast. Eventually I taught her not to stray, and she's never left the property since.

Ain't she cute?

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa62/Silver-King/Xmas2008038-3.jpg

nevada
01-01-2009, 02:45 AM
labradoodles are awesome dogs. I lean toward shelter dogs. My dog is a rescue dog from ARF (Animal REscue Foundation) she was rescued off the reserve when she was a puppy. She was wild and the rest of the litter was killed by coyotes. She's the sweetest, gentlest dog ever. Extremely smart and loves kids.

Remember, 95% of problems with dogs is owner problems. Most things like nervousness and excessive barking is more likely to be a result of not proper training and socializing than the breed itself although some breeds are more vocal than others.

You might look at getting a rescued Greyhound. They are extremely calm and gentle dogs but you cant let them off the leash. Usually the larger working dogs are calmer in the house while you are away. Don't get a supersmart dog like a border collie and expect it to amuse itself. Because it will. By destroying your house. Terriers tend to bark more. Hounds will howl. Each breed has its own characteristics and you'll have to do some research. Also when you get a pound puppy, look at the dominant breeds and expect it to have some of those traits.

THe most important thing, when you do decide on what kind of dog to get, is socialization and proper training and consistency in your behaviour and enforcement of the rules. When you get the puppy do not let it do stuff you don't want it to do as a grown dog. If you don't want a grown dog sleeping on your couch or bed, don't let it do it as a puppy. And go to puppy training classes and make sure that everyone, including the kids, knows what to do in each situation. Consistency is how you get a well-behaved, well-socialized dog, regardless of the breed.

JLCwrites
01-01-2009, 02:47 AM
Retrievers and Labs are good dogs. You may want to do some research on crate training, for the puppy's protection and to protect your furniture, and floors.

aldersmith
01-01-2009, 02:50 AM
My two cents is to go to a shelter. There are so many nice dogs/puppies there that really need a chance, especially in this economy. Spend some time with a few and see how they are with you and your children. It is my opinion that there are too many breeders out there just adding to the overpopulation. I have a Border Collie, she is a sweet dog, very loving and sounds like the size you need, BUT she needs a lot of attention and exercise, sometimes borders nip with kids too and try to herd them.

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 03:04 AM
Don't get a Cheewawa. They yip....all day. Some don't, but they're rare.

I grew up with a Doberman and I loved her to death, and she loved me in return completely. Best damn dog ever. She lived a long fruitful life, 17 years. Loyal as hell.

I've also grown up around Labs/retrievers. Blacks, Golds and Yellows. Great friggin dogs. Great with kids. Loyal as heck also. Totally trainable.

I have a Min-Pin Terrier mix now,
http://i39.tinypic.com/ztuf08.jpg
and she's a little devil. Cute as all hell, but a little devil. Lots of energy. Not a yipper, but lots of energy. She's an apartment dog. She goes craaaaaazy when she sees a yard, oh she's a fast one.

Potty training her was hard. It took a while before she "got it". Then again we were potty-box training. Not "out in the grass" training. Not sure which is easier.

I'm rambling.

I love dogs. You could always adopt a Pit. They need love. I had to foster my adopted pit out to somebody else, I couldn't care for her as she needed. Now she's happy. ;)

Devil Ledbetter
01-01-2009, 03:08 AM
Retrievers and Labs are good dogs. You may want to do some research on crate training, for the puppy's protection and to protect your furniture, and floors.Whatever we get, it will be crate trained. My pug was crate trained and loved her crate.

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 03:09 AM
The only problem I had with her was during the first year (she's seven now), when she would bolt when given the chance. She never ran far, but it was a bitch trying to catch her, as she's very fast. Eventually I taught her not to stray, and she's never left the property since.



So the Pin is where mine gets her speed from.......hmmmm.

veinglory
01-01-2009, 03:09 AM
The hybrids aren't bad per se but they are basically mutts that come out all shapes and sizes--but mongrels tend to be more vigorous and a puggle is a small-mid-size dog that likes exercise, but beagles have a tendency to bolt when on the scent. The problem is that most are not produced by responsible breeder. I would second considering a shelter or rescue. But failing that go to a breeder where you can see both parents and the full litter in situ and check out prior buyers to ensure there is no parvo, scabies and other disease issues. For kids and exercise and mid-sized cross dog with some lab/retreiver or collie in it will tend to work out well :)

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 03:11 AM
Whatever we get, it will be crate trained. My pug was crate trained and loved her crate.
Crate training is FANTASTIC! And really helps. You have to make sure you get one that is just about the size of the dog, if they have any room to seperate themself from their mess, the crate is pointless.

Mine was crate trained...and about 2 wks ago we started letting her sleep outside of it, she does just fine. She wakes in the morning, goes straight to her potty box, goes, then comes wakes us up. The crate is still there for when she needs to be confined (our dinner time, she's not quite "not a beggar" yet.)

CACTUSWENDY
01-01-2009, 03:14 AM
I love cocker spaniels.......they are sweet....family dogs with lots of pep.

tjwriter
01-01-2009, 03:16 AM
Just my opinion, but puggles and the like are designer mutts. The beagle in them will make them want to 'explore' and our neighbors had one that barked and barked and barked. She wanted attention 24/7.

Shelter dogs are good and you can do multiple visits to see how they behave, but the interactions there will give you a good idea.

Pits are good dogs, but mine is animal aggressive. He was never taught any better. Great with kids. Now that we have a baby in the house again, I'm calling him Nanny Dog once more. He has to come running and see what's going on every time the baby cries. And you better be fixin' what's wrong with the baby.

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 03:19 AM
My two cents is to go to a shelter. There are so many nice dogs/puppies there that really need a chance, especially in this economy. Spend some time with a few and see how they are with you and your children. It is my opinion that there are too many breeders out there just adding to the overpopulation. I have a Border Collie, she is a sweet dog, very loving and sounds like the size you need, BUT she needs a lot of attention and exercise, sometimes borders nip with kids too and try to herd them.

Some associations will let you try out a dog. Take it for a week, see how it does, return if necessary.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
01-01-2009, 03:20 AM
Patience, Grasshopper.

Do not rush into a puppy... and do your homework. Research. Do not wear your heart on your sleave when you go to look.

It is a hard thing I ask, I know... but if you are patient, and wise, all that you desire will come to you. As impossible as that seems... there is the perfect dog waiting for you 'out there', but you MUST use your head to find him or her.

badducky
01-01-2009, 03:27 AM
With an older cat, and an aversion to larger dogs on your part (Labs are sweeties, but they are BIG sweeties) I recommend a Spaniel. English Springer Spaniels basically ignore cats, have not a mean bone in their body and bite with their lips. Great family dogs. All spaniels are probably a good fit.

They do need some brushing, but you can always go the lazy route and get 'em regularly shaved.

Silver King
01-01-2009, 03:30 AM
So the Pin is where mine gets her speed from.......hmmmm.
Min Pins were originally bred to control rodent populations. There isn't a rat or squirrel or mouse that's safe around my dog. She's caught birds also, and the occasional lizard. She's a fiend when it comes to insects as well, and can snap a fly out of mid air if it gets too close.

She's a fine dog, the best one I've ever owned.

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 03:32 AM
Min Pins were originally bred to control rodent populations. There isn't a rat or squirrel or mouse that's safe around my dog. She's caught birds also, and the occasional lizard. She's a fiend when it comes to insects as well, and can snap a fly out of mid air if it gets too close.

She's a fine dog, the best one I've ever owned.

My dog is bizarre, but bred to find mice explains her habit...

This dog finds any and ALL socks in the house. Wherever they may be, she finds them and brings them to me.

Dirty or clean. But she will bury herself in a laundry basket, totally avoid anything else, and dig out a sock. No undies, no shirts, no bras. Socks.

veinglory
01-01-2009, 03:34 AM
Yep, be patient--never go to "look" at puppies in a store or questionable breeder. Once you see them it may be too late.

rugcat
01-01-2009, 03:48 AM
We have a Min-Pin that's very smart, affable, even-tempered, is great with children and loving to a faulthttp://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa62/Silver-King/Xmas2008038-3.jpgI would not get a min pin. Don't get me wrong -- my girlfriend has one (but he's really mine) and they are truly great dogs. Anyone who's read my books will see where I got my idea for the dog from. I take him on off leash walks, and except for an obsession with catching squirrels, so far unsuccessful, he's a perfect gentleman.

http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r33/rugcat/halloLou.jpg

But they take a lot of training, and it helps to be an experienced dog owner. They can be difficult, and they're not always particularly good with kids.

I'd go with a shelter dog, myself, not necessarily a puppy. Or, if you want an exceptional breed, though one that needs a lot of exercise, think about a mini-aussie. (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.miniaussierescue.org/images/DocThrowTheBall-small.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.miniaussierescue.org/whatIsMA/whatIsMA.html&usg=__t4axiaQVhzoxBDNSmlF1RIVPx-I=&h=270&w=252&sz=23&hl=en&start=4&um=1&tbnid=_5hlxnOFIa3JdM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=105&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmini%2Baussie%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa fe%3Doff%26sa%3DN) Thirty pounds or so, smart as a whip, eminently trainable -- lovely dogs.

Silver King
01-01-2009, 03:58 AM
My dog is bizarre, but bred to find mice explains her habit...

This dog finds any and ALL socks in the house. Wherever they may be, she finds them and brings them to me.

Dirty or clean. But she will bury herself in a laundry basket, totally avoid anything else, and dig out a sock. No undies, no shirts, no bras. Socks.
That sounds very much like a fetish to me. ;)

I've had a couple of friends and one family member choose Min Pins based solely upon their their interactions with my dog. Two of them turned out to be good pets, but the third is a downright lunatic that chews everything in sight and relieves himself on the couches in the living room. They blame the dog, but much of it has to do with their lack of training for the animal and how their children treat the dog as if he were a favorite sibling and can do no wrong.

Devil Ledbetter
01-01-2009, 04:01 AM
Yep, be patient--never go to "look" at puppies in a store or questionable breeder. Once you see them it may be too late.No really, I'm okay with this. I know better than to fall in love with the first puppy I meet. It's my 11-year-old DD who is dying to get a puppy immediately. I'm happy to wait until the right one comes along (and make DD wait, too). At any rate, I live in a smallish town where they don't sell dogs at stores. I'm limited to classified ads or the shelter.


With an older cat, and an aversion to larger dogs on your part (Labs are sweeties, but they are BIG sweeties) I recommend a Spaniel. English Springer Spaniels basically ignore cats, have not a mean bone in their body and bite with their lips. Great family dogs. All spaniels are probably a good fit.

They do need some brushing, but you can always go the lazy route and get 'em regularly shaved.My parents had a springer spaniel. She was sweet, but we used to say she had a bee in head. The bee slept all the time, until the dog was left alone. Then the bee would wake up and make her crazy. This dog actually ate a telephone. Ripped it right off the wall and chewed it up. And it wasn't like they left her alone for long periods, either. She was a very happy dog on the whole (nickname: Wags) but too nutty for me. And my dad was actually quite firm about training her, but her good behavior was strictly limited to when she was supervised.

Is it possible to crate train a springer?

Two of my favorite dogs right now are rescued shelter mutts: a beagle mix who lives in my neighborhood, and my BIL's lab/rott/boxer mix (http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/cole.jpg). I've always been fond of beagles and other "hound" type dogs.

Silver King
01-01-2009, 04:13 AM
http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r33/rugcat/halloLou.jpg


That's a good looking fellow, made more handsome by not having his ears and tail cropped. Now about that frilly accessory he's been made to wear... :) [/quote]

Jersey Chick
01-01-2009, 04:18 AM
Just a word on greyhounds - if you do decide on one, make sure it is cat safe. Not all greys are.


Good luck!

(we're trying to get my husband to see reason and get a dog as well. :D)

Siddow
01-01-2009, 04:28 AM
Please please please go to the shelter and get a dog.

Look for any kind of labrador.

You don't have to have a puppy, do you? I adopted a 4-yr-old doxxie who has adapted well to our family and we love him to pieces.

rugcat
01-01-2009, 04:46 AM
That's a good looking fellow, made more handsome by not having his ears and tail cropped. Now about that frilly accessory he's been made to wear... :) Not my fault. (It was for a Christmas card -- he only put up with it for about a minute.)

Plot Device
01-01-2009, 04:51 AM
I love cocker spaniels.......they are sweet....family dogs with lots of pep.


I love cockers also, but they're needy needy needy.

Karen Duvall
01-01-2009, 04:55 AM
Oh, dear. A puppy. Hmm... And you and your husband work full time? Not a good idea to get a wee one. Seriously. Puppies need and deserve a lot of care and training, and IMO, shouldn't be left alone for more than 2 hours at a time. I can almost guarantee you'll have behavior problems when that puppy grows up if it's left couped up for hours at a time. OMG! That would be terribly cruel to do to a baby dog!

I'm home all day with my puppy, who just turned 8 weeks old, and smart as she is (house-trained in about 1 day), she needs and deserves a lot of attention. She's a border collie/pit bull mix and sweet as can be, but her teeth are sharp and play time can be a painful experience if you're not prepared. I have 3 cats and they enjoy her for the most part, though the chase-play they do can get out of hand if the cats aren't in the mood. The puppy loves the kitties. Oh, and she never barks. Well, I think I've heard her bark 5 times in the 4 weeks we've had her.

This is Kinsey:

http://i326.photobucket.com/albums/k427/KarenDuvall/Kinsey2.jpg



I echo Siddow on getting a shelter dog. That's what I wanted to do, but I was afraid it wouldn't get along with all my indoor cats, and that would be devastating.

Puppies are cute, but they're a lot of work and your kids, especially the 7 year old, will get tired of being a chew toy pretty quick. An young dog is really your best option. Good luck with whatever you choose to do.

jennifer75
01-01-2009, 04:57 AM
her teeth are sharp and play time can be a painful experience if you're not prepared. Puppies are cute, but they're a lot of work and your kids, especially the 7 year old, will get tired of being a chew toy pretty quick. An young dog is really your best option. Good luck with whatever you choose to do.

Agreed. My son avoided ours when she was a pup, sharp teeth. They've almost all fallen out now (the baby razor teeth), and she has learned to lick instead of bite, and now we're all happy.

Siddow
01-01-2009, 05:11 AM
Can we get a shout-out for puppy breath?

I love puppy breath. Smells like sweet onions. :D

joyce
01-01-2009, 05:21 AM
Can we get a shout-out for puppy breath?

I love puppy breath. Smells like sweet onions. :D

Puppy breath is the greatest. I have owned labs for years. They are great dogs but my males have always been needy. Of course I love needy, so it doesn't bother me. My daughter has a rescued pit and he's changed everything I ever thought bad about those dogs. Good luck in whatever you choose to bring home. It sounds like the lucky dog is going to get a bunch of love.

Monkey
01-01-2009, 06:31 AM
I love puppy breath! SQUEEE.

My advice is to look in the classifieds. Look for ads that say "Free Puppies" or are selling puppies for under $30. Then call and ask what kind they are, asking lots of questions about the mom and taking anything they say about the dad with a grain of salt.

Here's my reasoning:
*The dogs are most likely going to be mutts. They may also be destined for the shelter if not adopted out.
*They are spending the crucial early weeks in the care of their mother, alongside their siblings, which can help them to be more calm, less nippy, and generally less neurotic than puppies seperated too early.
*Shelter dogs often have problems associated with being kept in a shelter. One of mine had an awful chewing problem anytime he was alone, and another had no problem with walking in his own feces, and often did--just before coming inside.
*You can meet the mother (and sometimes the father, too, but don't count on it) and see if there are any undesireable personality traits.
* Assuming that you find a mother dog of the right size and temperament, you'll have several of her offspring to choose from.

Don't choose a puppy that seems listless. Your puppy should be active, alert, curious, and bright-eyed. You probably don't want the puppy that's trying to dominate all its siblings...a good, middle-of-the-road beta is probably what you need (the kids and the kitty).

Best of luck on your puppy search!

Karen Duvall
01-01-2009, 07:22 AM
My advice is to look in the classifieds. Look for ads that say "Free Puppies" or are selling puppies for under $30. Then call and ask what kind they are, asking lots of questions about the mom and taking anything they say about the dad with a grain of salt.


That's how I got my puppy, from Craig's list. She was free, but the farm she lived on was so far away that I paid them to bring her to me. Actually, they brought all six of the puppies so that I could pick from the litter.


*They are spending the crucial early weeks in the care of their mother, alongside their siblings, which can help them to be more calm, less nippy, and generally less neurotic than puppies seperated too early.

Unfortunately, the people I got my puppy from let her leave the litter too soon. She was weaned from her mother, but that's not a good enough reason to get rid of the pups. I think they just wanted them out from under their feet. The owners were a very, very young married couple. Anyway, my puppy was only 4 weeks old when we got her, which is way too young. Her eyes were still violet and she didn't walk very well. She didn't have a chance to learn bite inhibition from her mother and littermates, so I've been teaching her myself, and it's not been easy. I try to mirror what her mom dog would have done, and it's working pretty well, though it's been a challenge. My poor husband's arm is one big scab from Kinsey's playful nipping. He doesn't like to tell her "no." He's such a softy.

Komnena
01-01-2009, 08:05 AM
Shelter animals have usually been health checked. It's been my experience that shelter animals are usually cheaper to adopt than free ones, at least with cats. You're a lot less likely to get expensive health problems and the heartbreak that can come with them.

Alan Yee
01-01-2009, 08:21 AM
Get a Labrador. They're the best. My 9-month-old puppy is a Lab, and so was the dog we owned before her. Labradors are a very smart breed.

NeuroFizz
01-01-2009, 09:01 AM
We have a 9 year-old yellow lab, raised her from a pup, and she has been a wonderful family dog--she helped us raise our two kids (currently 8 and 6 years old). We recently adopted a cat, and the two became fast friends. Before the cat, we adopted a retired greyhound (who also bonded with the lab), and he was an absolutely wonderful family member. He was a huge dog, but no one told him--he always wanted to climb up on our laps. Unfortunately, he was very old and we had to put him down about a year ago. Years before that, I had a lab-golden retriever mix, and that was also a wonderful dog. I'm sold on labs and goldens for family dogs, so if you can adopt a mutt with lab or golden lineage, go for that. These breeds are not huge, but they are not small either.

brad_b
01-01-2009, 10:10 AM
Patience, Grasshopper.

Do not rush into a puppy... and do your homework. Research. Do not wear your heart on your sleave when you go to look.



All puppies and kittens should be kept far away from everybody! Okay, that's because I'm such a pushover for any baby animal, animals in general. God made them so darned cute they all want to come home with me. I've had so many in life and loved them all. A shelter dog has my vote, I can't stand to go there afraid I'll end up adopting the place. Have fun, though, pets rawk!

Tigercub
01-01-2009, 12:13 PM
I don't want to hijack this thread, but it's a topic I have some questions about myself. Now that I have a house, a dog is a possibility. I have several cats, who like to race through the house. I don't work now, but that will change as soon as I can manage it! I do have a reasonably sized yard. I'm not the sort that will take the dog out jogging, though frisbee in the yard will be on the agenda.

I'm most concerned about the cats. They've never had to deal with a dog, although they're obviously used to other cats. I'd need to get a breed that would see the cats racing through the house and think, "Oh, boy! Let's play!" and not "Oh, boy. Prey!" if you get my drift. And I'd need to get a dog that's okay hangng around the house with the cats until I get home. No doggie doors. The cats are indoor only. Last time one of my cats got out, he was missing for three days and came home thinner (but at least he came home).

What breed would be best for this situation? I grew up with the family dog, but I've never personally owned one.

SarahDavidson
01-01-2009, 12:46 PM
I have mastiffs, and they love cats, dogs, people--pretty much everybody-- if they're socialized well. They're also protective of home/family, but not vicious at all. They were originally bred as farm dogs to protect large estates and manage herds of livestock. They don't need a ton of exercise, and they're gentle giants... so the OP probably wouldn't want one unless she rethinks the big dog/little dog dilemma, but they'd be the perfect dog for Tigercub. Short hair, easy to keep clean, relatively sedentary unless you inspire them otherwise, and just big babies.

aruna
01-01-2009, 01:21 PM
What's a DD?

If I were to get another dog I'd ger a Retriever. I love them. I also love our present dog, but he is a PITA. He's now 8, and as bouncy and bumpy as a puppy! He's just adorable, but that's half the problem. He overflows with love and affection. The momenbt you come in the back door he's jumping all over you. When it;s time for walkies he jumps around the place, barking, like crazy. Drives me mad!

He's a Husky Alsation Terrier Collie mutt, and everytime we go out people stop to admire him and ask what breed he is. We all love him to bits but he really is a PITA.

Nakhlasmoke
01-01-2009, 03:04 PM
We have a pitbull/staffie cross, and she is FANTASTIC with kids. Another dog that is surprisingly good with children (if you feel you need to get a pure-breed) is a bull terrier.

I like staffies and bull terriers because they're robust, stocky, don't have coats that require massive amounts of attention, and strangers are less likely to come "visit' your property.

eta: Tigercub - we had a rescue dog (for a very short while) that killed my cat. Now I will never trust a dog with German Shepherd in it.

However, my pit/staffie is also good with the cats, although at least two of them were adults when she was a puppy, so it may be a hierarchy thing. She will NEVER cross the kitchen mog - to the point that if he's sitting in the doorway she won't push past him, but wait for one of us to move the cat. So yeah, I'd say she's good with cats. Certainly I learned my lesson to never again bring an adult dog into a house full of cats.

sheadakota
01-01-2009, 06:29 PM
Not sure where you are from but considier this- housebreaking in the winter is the pitts- every two hours or so taking the little thing out in the freezing cold- it won't go because it just wants to go back in where it is warm and dry- I have two dogs and they were both winter puppies- never again- the next dog I get will be in the warmer weather- I remember one cold rainy night taking my lab puppy out and he crawled under the decka nd we couldn't get him out for HOURS- ah, yes the memories!

I have one pure bred and two rescues- i highly recomend mixed breeds- Love my lab- but VERY VERY needy.

Mr Flibble
01-01-2009, 06:34 PM
I'm most concerned about the cats. They've never had to deal with a dog, although they're obviously used to other cats. I'd need to get a breed that would see the cats racing through the house and think, "Oh, boy! Let's play!" and not "Oh, boy. Prey!"

That was the problem we had with our pup - he wanted to play so ran after them. Cat's were not so keen. Face full of claws stops pup in tracks. He's learned his place now though.

But as for the rest - I'd say go with a cross-breed. Healthier if nothing else, lack on inbred problems etc. And our Springer / collie cross is at the same time pretty intelligent ( learns new commands in about ten minutes) and completely brainless and soppy. I reckon the kids could pull his legs off and he'd still sit there ( okay lay there) with that 'please cuddle me' look on his face. He's a sucker for the old 'fake throw' trick too - gets him every time :D

Devil Ledbetter
01-01-2009, 09:42 PM
Oh, dear. A puppy. Hmm... And you and your husband work full time? Not a good idea to get a wee one. Seriously. Puppies need and deserve a lot of care and training, and IMO, shouldn't be left alone for more than 2 hours at a time. I can almost guarantee you'll have behavior problems when that puppy grows up if it's left couped up for hours at a time. OMG! That would be terribly cruel to do to a baby dog!While I appreciate your opinion, I don't see being left alone for four hours (as opposed to two) as "terribly cruel." I suppose what's "cruel" might depend on the puppy's temperament and his age. I wasn't planning to get a puppy too young to be separated from his mother.

Back when I got my pug puppy (12 weeks old) I was working full time and single, and she was home alone for two four-hour stretches every day. She handled it very well and I never had any behavior problems with her. Because I'm married with kids now, the dog we get will be home alone for just one four-hour stretch in the morning, and then another 90 minutes in the afternoon. If the puppy can't handle it, we have a couple of options: there is a dog daycare near my office, and also a lady in our area who walks people's dogs for them during the work day (she takes care of my SIL's Shih Ztu - SIL can't come home for lunch).


Not sure where you are from but considier this- housebreaking in the winter is the pitts- every two hours or so taking the little thing out in the freezing cold- it won't go because it just wants to go back in where it is warm and dry- I have two dogs and they were both winter puppies- never again- the next dog I get will be in the warmer weather.This is a concern of mine, since I'm in Michigan. I housebroke my pug in March, and March = a winter month in this part of the country. Pugs are so small (especially pups) that you have to keep an area shoveled out where they can "go" and not be nose deep in snow. "Wait 'til summer" would be great for me, but if I do that, I may have a mutiny on my hands with the kids.;)



But as for the rest - I'd say go with a cross-breed. Healthier if nothing else, lack on inbred problems etc. I'm really leaning this way. I so do not want a wall-eyed or otherwise unhealthy dog.

Devil Ledbetter
01-01-2009, 09:49 PM
we had a rescue dog (for a very short while) that killed my cat. Now I will never trust a dog with German Shepherd in it.

However, my pit/staffie is also good with the cats, although at least two of them were adults when she was a puppy, so it may be a hierarchy thing. She will NEVER cross the kitchen mog - to the point that if he's sitting in the doorway she won't push past him, but wait for one of us to move the cat. So yeah, I'd say she's good with cats. Certainly I learned my lesson to never again bring an adult dog into a house full of cats.YIKES!

Danger Jane
01-01-2009, 09:54 PM
I love cockers also, but they're needy needy needy.

I've heard this, but could it be that it's more the overbred "typical cocker spaniel" that has these traits? We have a two year old field cocker and he's great...fun to play with, but not hyperactive, which was a big deal because our chocolate lab was totally tireless until she was about 7 years old...he was afraid of post-pubescent boys and men for a while, even my dad, but with a little clever conditioning (I had a violin student whose dad came to pick her up from her lessons, and we'd give him a treat when he was still outside. A few weeks later he was cured!) he was fine.

The only problem is that he's a frikking mountain goat. Nothing on a counter is safe and he has a wicked sweet tooth. Working on that, though, with a bottle of bitter apple...basically he's just very smart, not sure if they all are or if it's just him, but it was a pain in the ass when he learned how to open zippers.

Only thing I miss about our lab was that NO WAY would anyone have dared to break in with her barking at the door. The cocker...he's feisty enough, but uh, he weighs thirty pounds. So I'm not sure how much good he does in terms of protecting from break-ins.

regdog
01-01-2009, 10:13 PM
I will cast my vote for a shelter or rescue. My late Min Pin was a shelter rescue, he was very old dog when we got him, but he was a character. My pug came from a pug rescue. He's unique to say the least.

Another vote for greyhounds. There are many greyhound rescues out there with young dogs who have been fostered with cats. They are good natured dogs who are good with children and content to be by their person.

cray
01-01-2009, 10:38 PM
http://www.pointernet.pds.hu/kutya/hungarian_short_haired_pointer_vizsla/image/hungarian_pointer_ungarischer_vorstehhund_vizsla_0 07.jpg

we have a vizsla -
they calm down by age 9 or so. :D

Shadow_Ferret
01-01-2009, 11:21 PM
You know, honestly, all this depends on what age you get the puppy, how well you socialize it, what its own personal history and genetics are. I had a keeshond, best damned dog I ever owned, sweet, obedient, intelligent, and yet the vet would always muzzle him because the vet had one bad experience with a kees sometime in his past. I had a dobe who was a big baby. My dal-mix, though hyper as a pup, is now mellow and needy and lets the kids rough house him. Our Jack Russell-mix is active but good with the kids. (Both of these were rescues)

I'd suggest going here (http://www.dogsindepth.com/) and do some research on the different breeds.

TerzaRima
01-02-2009, 01:25 AM
I'll weigh in against using the classifieds--I think you can trust a shelter or rescue more than someone who is offloading an animal this way. You get more information about temperament and child/cat compatibility from knowledgeable people if you go through a shelter or rescue.

I would NOT get a puggle. Every one I've known is yappy and weird. I can't say enough good about the two mutts we adopted through the shelter--there is something to be said for hybrid vigor, even though mutt #1 is not the sharpest tool in the shed.



And I know I'm preaching to the choir here, but for God's sake don't go to Petland or any of those places.

AmandaAcidic
01-03-2009, 02:16 AM
We used to raise Dalmatians (http://www.dogsindepth.com/nonsporting_dog_breeds/dalmatian.html) when I was younger and the were great dogs. We only keep the three adults and they were great. One was dumb as a post, one was shy and followed the dumb one every where, and one was the best dog a girl could ask for. I defiantly recommend them for a family pet. They need lots of exercise but as long as you have a yard it should be fine. I know as soon as I get my first house I'm getting one again.

Good luck!

Devil Ledbetter
01-03-2009, 06:49 PM
After doing more research (particularly at petfinder.com) we've decided to get a shelter dog, young - as in 2 years or younger, but not necessarily a puppy. There is just a heartbreaking number of dogs needing homes, and I've no doubt we can find the right one without looking to a breeder.

The larger pet supply stores coordinate with the shelters to offer "adoption events" where you can meet available dogs needing homes. We'll be attending a couple of these today. Even if we don't find "our" dog there, we can let the local shelter/dog foster people know that we want one.

We're leaning toward a beagle mix of some kind, but are open minded.

I really appreciate all of the opinions and help everyone in this thread provided. Thank you!

nevada
01-03-2009, 07:38 PM
YAY!!!! I'm so glad you decided to get a shelter dog. When you meet "the one" you'll know. It'll be instant love on both sides. My dog was so quiet when I met her, and she was almost hiding. There was another dog, Riley, and he was so happy and outgoing but the minute I saw Nevada I knew she was my dog. She came home with me and it was like she'd always been there. You'll know when you meet "your" dog.

aruna
01-04-2009, 02:03 PM
One other thing: make sure the puppy gets good training. I didn't know a thing about dog training when I got our puppy and left it all to my daughter, who didn't know a thing either (she was ten). The result is that he was spoilt, and obeyed little more than SIT and STAY THERE and LIE DOWN. I've tried to correct him since then, and since watching programmes such as Me or the Dog and the Dog Whisperer, and it has improved, but I still have two problems with him, and would be happy for any advice. Rather than start a new thread, thoguht I'd add this here and hope Devil doesn't mind...

1. he runs off and won't come back when he's called, especially if he finds another dog to play with. We have a nice park nearby and that's where I take him for walks, and I love to let him off the lead so he can run to his heart's delight. But the moment I do he's off, and sometimes he just disappears. If he finds a dof to play with, and I call him, he simply ignores me. He'll gallop off in the oppposite direction and pay me no attention at all. Or when I'm ready to go home, and I call him,, he'll take his own leasurely time, stopping to sniff here and there, pee against trees, run in a zig zag, inspect a bush, or whatever. Once he's off the leash he just does not accept me as apck leader.

At home, he does. I've managed to control his excitablillity by making him lie down when he's leaping around barking because we're going for a walk. He's not allowed upstairs, and he knows this and stays in the kitchen (kitchen is downstairs, everything else is up a half-flight. But...

2. I have a couple of rugs on the floor, and I want them to stay where I put them, but he just scratches them away. One is a doormat just inside the kitchen door; he likes to lie down on the bare tiles there so he just kicks the rug away. The other is a larger rug in the hallway, put there to protect the carpet beneath it from the likes of dirty shoes, dirty paws and dog hair. He will just scratch it away as if he owns the place, and lie down wihtout them. This is so annoying!

That's why I say he is a PITA. Any suggestions?

KTC
01-04-2009, 06:24 PM
I believe that Golden Retrievers are the best family dogs.

Angelinity
01-04-2009, 06:42 PM
i was going to say Dalmatian, but just saw your last post -- yay!!

Wish I could send you a Dalmatian from here... people 'round here (expats) leave the most wonderful dogs behind without a second thought -- last month there was a beautiful Dalmatian looking for a loving home :(

Mythical Tiger
01-04-2009, 07:27 PM
I don't know if I can be of any help, but here I go:

We've been breeding rottweilers, mastiffs, and lhasa apsos for a very long time. We've had numerous litters of puppies:D. Rottweilers are big and, I must say, very gentle. We have a lot of rottweilers and five of our rottweilers have chosen each of us to follow around. There easy to train and fun to have around.

Mastiffs are pretty good sized dogs. We had this one male that was big enough to jump about 10 foot fences[no joke:Shrug:] There as loyal as rottweilers but harder to handle. If you want a big dog, either rottweiler or mastiff is the way to go;).

Ah, leave the smallest for the last. The lhasa apso. Now these funny little guys are cute. You can have the option to let there fur grow and have it dragging dust on the floor, or shave it once in awhile:). When there puppys you want to laugh at how cute they are. Literally. There great around our cats[as well as our rottweilers and mastiffs] and will stick to you like glue. There great around kids[ditto with the Rotts and mastiffs] and again can be trained easily.

Sorry about the short descriptions:tongue. But out of these three my best bet to reccomend to you is either the rottweiler or the lhasa apsos. If you have any other questions, then just pm me:e2bear:. Hope this helped and good luck!

nevada
01-04-2009, 09:38 PM
Aruna, start carrying around little dog treats in your pocket. Some Rollover (do they sell that there?) cut up into small pieces. And just randomly during the day, call the dog. When he comes, make him sit and give him a treat. Do this for about a week. While you are doing that, don't let him off the leash outside so that the only time you call him and he comes is inside where you can give him a treat. Don't give him the opportunity to not come when you call. If he's really stubborn, it might take two weeks.

Then start calling him outside, but only when he's on the leash. THis works really well if you have an extender leash. The point is to give him the opportunity to obey while you can control him. Only call him once, if he doesn't listen reigh him in without giving him any other commands, make him sit, then give him the treat. Remember to praise like crazy. By this time, though he should be coming on his own. Eventually, you'll have to let him off the leash and try it. Remember, only issue the command once. If he doesn't listen, physically go get him. Remember how adults are when a kid goes "mom, mom, mom, mom, mom?" They tune them out. Same thing with dogs. Don't keep repeating the command because you're just enforcing the disobedience of the command. Food is the ultimate reward. Make sure that whoever calls him, when he comes he gets a very small treat. Don't make him fat. lol I don't think it'll take very long to retrain him.

The rugs, I think you're just gonna have to deal with that. I have no idea what to do about that. lol sorry.

Devil Ledbetter
01-05-2009, 07:04 AM
We have our dog!

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james51.jpg

This is James. He is a 5-year-old smooth-coated Jack Russell terrier from the rescue organization S.A.F.E. (Save Animals From Euthanasia). He is calm in the house and energetic outside, a total sweetheart, housebroken, neutered, crate trained and doesn't beg for food. We adore him. He's also an incredibly fast learner.

I'd thought I'd want a younger dog, possibly a beagle mix, but when we went to see the shelter dogs at Petsmart this little guy stole my heart ... even though there was a young and adorable beagle/Italian greyhound right next door to him. Nevada was right: when you meet your dog, you just know.

He has a couple of bad habits we're working on, but they're minor. The lady who was fostering him was allowing him on her furniture, but he's been great about jumping right down as soon as we tell him no. On the leash, he's a real puller, and he is a strong little guy. I'm using the "no forward motion" method to break him of this (where you stop walking when they pull, and don't start again until the leash is slack.) It's slow going and he did take me down on an icy sidewalk this morning, but I'm hoping he'll catch on in a few weeks.

We took him to run with a friend's pointer at a nearby fenced schoolyard. He did great, running and playing with the other dog but not fighting. He let her have the frisbee every time, even when he got there first. He's just a little gentleman.

Anyway, we're over the moon about him. I'm so appreciative of all of the advice in this thread, especially about considering an older dog from a rescue organization instead of a puppy.

Isn't he the sweetest?

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james11.jpg

MsK
01-05-2009, 07:18 AM
Ah....
Congratulations on your new baby boy. James looks super sweet.
And bless your heart for going with a rescue dog. :)

nevada
01-05-2009, 08:07 AM
OMG what a cutie. i just wanna hug him and squeeze him. I'm so glad you found *your* dog. Hurrah for everyone.

threedogpeople
01-05-2009, 09:12 AM
Outstanding!! He's wonderful and you made an excellent choice. A five year old's bladder & nervous system work well together and they have gotten past their crazy, juvenile period.

Congratulations, he looks like an excellent pup. Keep us posted on all the things he's learned!

If you are still having some trouble with the pulling try finding a "Halti" harness. It has little straps that fit over his muzzle, when he pulls it will turn his head to the side. He won't pull if he can't see where he is going. It cost us $20 for ours (for a much bigger dog or I would send it to you) but two times out on a walk and our girl didn't pull anymore.

Judy


We have our dog!

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james51.jpg

This is James. He is a 5-year-old smooth-coated Jack Russell terrier from the rescue organization S.A.F.E. (Save Animals From Euthanasia). He is calm in the house and energetic outside, a total sweetheart, housebroken, neutered, crate trained and doesn't beg for food. We adore him. He's also an incredibly fast learner.

I'd thought I'd want a younger dog, possibly a beagle mix, but when we went to see the shelter dogs at Petsmart this little guy stole my heart ... even though there was a young and adorable beagle/Italian greyhound right next door to him. Nevada was right: when you meet your dog, you just know.

He has a couple of bad habits we're working on, but they're minor. The lady who was fostering him was allowing him on her furniture, but he's been great about jumping right down as soon as we tell him no. On the leash, he's a real puller, and he is a strong little guy. I'm using the "no forward motion" method to break him of this (where you stop walking when they pull, and don't start again until the leash is slack.) It's slow going and he did take me down on an icy sidewalk this morning, but I'm hoping he'll catch on in a few weeks.

We took him to run with a friend's pointer at a nearby fenced schoolyard. He did great, running and playing with the other dog but not fighting. He let her have the frisbee every time, even when he got there first. He's just a little gentleman.

Anyway, we're over the moon about him. I'm so appreciative of all of the advice in this thread, especially about considering an older dog from a rescue organization instead of a puppy.

Isn't he the sweetest?

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james11.jpg

ErylRavenwell
01-05-2009, 09:23 AM
A doberman may be a little too much for you to handle, but they are a very obedient and loyal breed.

http://www.my-doberman.com/images/doberman-puppy-image.jpg

ErylRavenwell
01-05-2009, 09:26 AM
We have our dog!

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james51.jpg

This is James. He is a 5-year-old smooth-coated Jack Russell terrier from the rescue organization S.A.F.E. (Save Animals From Euthanasia). He is calm in the house and energetic outside, a total sweetheart, housebroken, neutered, crate trained and doesn't beg for food. We adore him. He's also an incredibly fast learner.

I'd thought I'd want a younger dog, possibly a beagle mix, but when we went to see the shelter dogs at Petsmart this little guy stole my heart ... even though there was a young and adorable beagle/Italian greyhound right next door to him. Nevada was right: when you meet your dog, you just know.

He has a couple of bad habits we're working on, but they're minor. The lady who was fostering him was allowing him on her furniture, but he's been great about jumping right down as soon as we tell him no. On the leash, he's a real puller, and he is a strong little guy. I'm using the "no forward motion" method to break him of this (where you stop walking when they pull, and don't start again until the leash is slack.) It's slow going and he did take me down on an icy sidewalk this morning, but I'm hoping he'll catch on in a few weeks.

We took him to run with a friend's pointer at a nearby fenced schoolyard. He did great, running and playing with the other dog but not fighting. He let her have the frisbee every time, even when he got there first. He's just a little gentleman.

Anyway, we're over the moon about him. I'm so appreciative of all of the advice in this thread, especially about considering an older dog from a rescue organization instead of a puppy.

Isn't he the sweetest?

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/james11.jpg


Missed this post. Hey, well done.

Mythical Tiger
01-05-2009, 09:29 AM
Awwwww^_^ He's adorable! Congratulations!

jennifer75
01-05-2009, 09:44 AM
We have our dog!


Anyway, we're over the moon about him. I'm so appreciative of all of the advice in this thread, especially about considering an older dog from a rescue organization instead of a puppy.

Isn't he the sweetest?



Congratulations!!!! He IS the sweetest!!!!! So glad you found your friend!

aruna
01-05-2009, 11:20 AM
Happy to hear about the new addition to your family! How wonderful for all of you... I'm especially glad that James has found a family, one that loves him so much.

aruna
01-05-2009, 12:20 PM
Aruna, start carrying around little dog treats in your pocket. Some Rollover (do they sell that there?) cut up into small pieces. And just randomly during the day, call the dog. When he comes, make him sit and give him a treat. Do this for about a week. While you are doing that, don't let him off the leash outside so that the only time you call him and he comes is inside where you can give him a treat. Don't give him the opportunity to not come when you call. If he's really stubborn, it might take two weeks.

y.
Thanks, nevada. I'll try this.

Marian Perera
01-05-2009, 12:55 PM
He's cute! He looks as though he's wearing a black mask.

KTC
01-07-2009, 04:32 AM
He's a beautiful boy. Congrats! And it sounds like he's a calm/submissive natural. Double congrats! ENJOY!

KTC
01-07-2009, 04:36 AM
As far as leash walking...if your method doesn't work, try this.


Put him on his leash and have him walk beside you on a short leash...just an inch behind your stride. If he tries to get ahead of you, step into his path...and if he tries to pass you on the other side, step into his path again. He will get it. If he still tries to insist getting in front of you, put your hand down at his face in a stop-sign and say, "Chhhhh". I've got the 'world's worst pullers' to walk gently at my side by doing this.

Good luck...I'm sure those bad behaviours will melt right away.


PS...the method I just explained takes about 3 minutes to re-train even the worst dog...if you have a calm/assertive energy while doing it. It's pretty much what Cesar does...it's been working for me for years.

Devil Ledbetter
01-07-2009, 05:42 AM
He's a beautiful boy. Congrats! And it sounds like he's a calm/submissive natural. Double congrats! ENJOY!Thanks. I'm not sure if he's a "natural" beta. There was a huge improvement in his attitude as soon as I started making him "sit" before giving him anything, making him wait until after we ate before feeding him, etc. He just needed to learn his place.


As far as leash walking...if your method doesn't work, try this.


Put him on his leash and have him walk beside you on a short leash...just an inch behind your stride. If he tries to get ahead of you, step into his path...and if he tries to pass you on the other side, step into his path again. He will get it. If he still tries to insist getting in front of you, put your hand down at his face in a stop-sign and say, "Chhhhh". I've got the 'world's worst pullers' to walk gently at my side by doing this.

Good luck...I'm sure those bad behaviours will melt right away.


PS...the method I just explained takes about 3 minutes to re-train even the worst dog...if you have a calm/assertive energy while doing it. It's pretty much what Cesar does...it's been working for me for years.Ooh, I am so going to try this! I've been doing the quick change of direction so I'm always leading, which means we either walk back and forth in front of our house, or zigzag around the trees on the boulevard. And of course praising when he walks with a loose leash. He's improving, but slowly. I've also been "choosing" the trees/bushes he can sniff or pee on, to show him I'm in charge. ;) Your method sounds a lot easier. I'll try it and report back.

Devil Ledbetter
01-07-2009, 06:49 AM
Wow, Kevin. That really worked. I had to walk like the guys in The Monkees for a few blocks to prevent him from passing me, but he really caught on fast. I feel like we could go on real walk now, to an actual destination instead of zigzagging around the boulevard.

Thank you so much!

KTC
01-07-2009, 07:10 AM
That's wonderful news, Devil. As long as you are, in your head, the leader when you try this method it works like gold. There's a guy in the neighborhood who was being pulled mercilessly and I showed him a few years back...it took 2 minutes. He would sometimes be black and blue from mishaps...I mean, this guy's dog pulled like mad. It works almost instantly. I hope it continues to improve for you. I'm so glad it worked!



ETA: They are usually relieved to be relieved of the leader role in the walk. The pulling usually comes from fear...as in, "Where do I go?! Where do I go?!" Zigzag, pull, pull, pull. Once you take the leader role from them and own it...they almost audibly sigh. And then they walk beside you...ready to follow.

TerzaRima
01-07-2009, 07:16 AM
Congratulations on your new family member, DL-what a sweet little dude! And you've saved his life. I love hearing stories like these.

KTC, I'm going to try that tip with our basset hound. When she's in the mood to pull, i'm almost airborne.

Devil Ledbetter
01-15-2009, 06:44 AM
Here are some more pictures of our little cutie, James.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesAdoring.jpg

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesSweetFace.jpg

The flash makes his pupils look green. He has dark brown eyes.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesSleeping.jpg

Also, proof that our cat Abby is pure evil.;)
http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/ProofAbbyIsEvil-1.jpg

Actually, she's a sweetheart but I thought the picture was hilarious.

MsK
01-15-2009, 06:48 AM
Abby's picture is pretty funny.

Ah... look at James, he's feeling right at home. :)

selkn.asrai
01-15-2009, 07:01 AM
i was going to say Dalmatian, but just saw your last post -- yay!!

Wish I could send you a Dalmatian from here... people 'round here (expats) leave the most wonderful dogs behind without a second thought -- last month there was a beautiful Dalmatian looking for a loving home :(


*sigh* Send me one! I wish...

I love Dalmatians--have always had one--and have been bereft since ours passed away last year. But it's difficult to find them in my area; I think it's from all the abuse the breed received after the live-action film. Ever more important, however, I don't have enough to devote to a Dal--any dog at all, really--right now. I can't wait til I can have a Dalmatian again. In my mind, they're the most wonderful dogs.

I wonder what it is about expats and leaving pets behind... I've heard so many stories.


Devil--that is an adorable dog; I'm so glad he found a loving home. :)

jennifer75
01-15-2009, 07:10 AM
Here are some more pictures of our little cutie, James.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesAdoring.jpg



Awwww....that's the look. The look.....of love. You're done. You've found a friend for life.

nevada
01-15-2009, 07:11 AM
Puppy Pictures!!! He's adorable. totally kissable and huggable.

Thanks DL.

ErylRavenwell
01-15-2009, 07:59 AM
Hey, Dev, I love you for giving the dog a second chance. :) You're fantastic. Mighty well done. I love the picture below. Finally, a place where he can rest his weary head.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesSleeping.jpg

Joe270
01-15-2009, 08:41 AM
Congrats on the new pup, DL. He really looks like a winner to me, a real family dog.

It is so sad that so many 'pound puppies' aren't adopted out. People are missing really great pets.

A friend of ours adopted a Papillon from the pound. It is the most incredible little dog, so smart, incredibly well-mannered, never barks, very sweet. It exhibits none of the possible behavior problems associated with the breed, and we have thought that some of that comes from the pound. It's almost like the dogs know you saved their lives.

nevada
01-15-2009, 08:49 AM
It's almost like the dogs know you saved their lives.

I think they do. I really think they do.

<<<<<< rescued off the reserve as a puppy but not before the coyotes killed the rest of the litter. she's the sweetest, smartest, most loyal dog ever. she was housetrained in ten minutes, never had an accident in the house not even when there was an emergency and she was home alone for 20 hours. she loves babies and kids. I can't say how amazing she is. and yes, i think she knows i saved her.

emc07
01-15-2009, 10:17 AM
We are getting a puppy. The only thing holding us up is deciding what kind of dog to get. It turns out to be more complicated than I initially thought. I know we have a lot of "dog" people here, and I value your experience, expertise, wisdom and just plain old unvarnished opinions.

Here's our situation: We have a large house, a fenced yard and a mature cat (who is never going to forgive me). Our kids are 11 and 7, and just dying to get a puppy. DH and I work full time, but I come home for lunch (it's only 7 minutes from work) and DD is home by 2:45 in the afternoon. I usually take 5-mile walks and want a dog that can join me.

I like dogs that are calm, affable and intelligent. I dislike neediness, nervousness and excessive barking. I'm not crazy about very large dogs - I like small to midsize. I'm completely undecided on whether to get a breed dog or a shelter dog. My daughter wants a puggle, but I'm not convinced that the hybrid craze is all it's cracked up to be.

What are some good, family dogs?

We have an 11 week old girl rottweiler. She is the sweetest thing, licks everyone , loves other dogs and gets along with our 4 kitties too. Rotties need training, and they are incredibly intelligent and loyal. I think they get a bad rep. I've heard with a dog it's all about training. We have ours in puppy class once a week.

I wish you luck in finding the right puppy for you and your family!


Oh, dear. A puppy. Hmm... And you and your husband work full time? Not a good idea to get a wee one. Seriously. Puppies need and deserve a lot of care and training, and IMO, shouldn't be left alone for more than 2 hours at a time. I can almost guarantee you'll have behavior problems when that puppy grows up if it's left couped up for hours at a time. OMG! That would be terribly cruel to do to a baby dog!

I'm home all day with my puppy, who just turned 8 weeks old, and smart as she is (house-trained in about 1 day), she needs and deserves a lot of attention. She's a border collie/pit bull mix and sweet as can be, but her teeth are sharp and play time can be a painful experience if you're not prepared. I have 3 cats and they enjoy her for the most part, though the chase-play they do can get out of hand if the cats aren't in the mood. The puppy loves the kitties. Oh, and she never barks. Well, I think I've heard her bark 5 times in the 4 weeks we've had her.

This is Kinsey:

http://i326.photobucket.com/albums/k427/KarenDuvall/Kinsey2.jpg



I echo Siddow on getting a shelter dog. That's what I wanted to do, but I was afraid it wouldn't get along with all my indoor cats, and that would be devastating.

Puppies are cute, but they're a lot of work and your kids, especially the 7 year old, will get tired of being a chew toy pretty quick. An young dog is really your best option. Good luck with whatever you choose to do.



Cute puppy Karen, I love border collie's!!

Puppies are a TON of work. I had no idea until we got ours. WOW what an eye opener that was... I wish I could stay home with the puppy. My husband and I both work... He comes home at lunch to play with her and let her out. It seems to work.

emc07
01-15-2009, 10:19 AM
Here are some more pictures of our little cutie, James.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesAdoring.jpg

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesSweetFace.jpg

The flash makes his pupils look green. He has dark brown eyes.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/JamesSleeping.jpg

Also, proof that our cat Abby is pure evil.;)
http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/devilledbetter/ProofAbbyIsEvil-1.jpg

Actually, she's a sweetheart but I thought the picture was hilarious.

Aw! I missed that post before I posted... lol. James is adorable. Congratulations!

Satori1977
01-15-2009, 10:58 AM
Aww, he is so adorable! Congrats. I am glad you got him through a shelter as well. They make the best pets, IMO. Millions are killed in sheleters every year. I would never get a dog from a pet store, and don't even get me started on breeders. I think you made an excellent choice.

Oh, and though it is too late, have to put my two cents in on best breed...German Shepherds. Purebred dogs have a lot more physical problems, but I love Shepherds, as long as you train them right. I have a 12 year old, and he is the best dog I have ever had. Sweetest, gentlest creatures, great with my kids, and a terrific watchdog.