PDA

View Full Version : Breadfruit and other edibles?



Horserider
12-31-2008, 11:21 PM
First question: what are all the different ways you could open/eat/cook a breadfruit? (keeping in mind you do not have anything other than a fire, your bare hands and other things you might find on a deserted island in the middle of the south pacific)

Second question: what else can you eat on a deserted island in the middle of the south pacific?

Palmfrond
12-31-2008, 11:28 PM
Breadfruit is apparently edible raw (after peeling) according to ehow.com. It can be dried in the sun and eaten that way, or dried and ground up into flour. (Mix the flour with water and bake bread on a hot rock.)

No idea about question two.

JHillman
12-31-2008, 11:44 PM
[Second question: what else can you eat on a deserted island in the middle of the south pacific?[/quote]


You mean other than coconuts and all those fun things swimming the in the tidal pool down by the shore?

Or the occassional seagull that swings by to peck out your eyes?

Horserider
12-31-2008, 11:56 PM
[Second question: what else can you eat on a deserted island in the middle of the south pacific?


You mean other than coconuts and all those fun things swimming the in the tidal pool down by the shore?

Or the occassional seagull that swings by to peck out your eyes? [/QUOTE]

Ummm yes. How do you crack open coconuts anyway?

HoraceJames
12-31-2008, 11:57 PM
Kava?

Check out Fairchild Tropical Garden's website, they have a large collection of tropical plants and information about them.

Izunya
01-01-2009, 12:56 AM
You mean other than coconuts and all those fun things swimming the in the tidal pool down by the shore?

Or the occassional seagull that swings by to peck out your eyes?

Ummm yes. How do you crack open coconuts anyway?

An axe.

At least, that's the way my mom did it. Back when I was in elementary school, the local organic food store got in a shipment of coconuts with the outer layers still on, and she convinced my teacher that it would be educational, or at least interesting, for all the second graders to see what a real coconut was like. So she brought it to school. The coconut and the axe.

Y'know, I'm just under thirty, but I think I can honestly sound like an old fogey (fogette?) and say that it was a different time. I'm trying to imagine what would happen if my mother tried walking through the school with an axe over her shoulder in this day and age. It wasn't even a small axe.

At any rate, IIRC, the outer layer of the coconut was green and very fibrous, and it took some doing to get down to the actual brown hard coconut part. If I were shipwrecked . . . well, if I had a pocketknife, I might try to dig through that outer layer, but I might starve first. Some brute force is indicated, I think.

Izunya

GirlWithPoisonPen
01-01-2009, 01:05 AM
Dude, Google is your friend.

Wikipedia is your lover-in-waiting.

Although, you'd probably have ask us for the URLs for those too.

StephanieFox
01-01-2009, 01:06 AM
Breadfruit is very good roasted. Just put it in or near a fire.

What else? Fish, seafood. You might find some bird eggs and if you can catch a bird, you'd have that. There's seaweeds, but some aren't edible. Snails. Bugs. Grubs. Depending where you were, there might even be wild boar, but with only bare hands, you'd probably find youself as it's lunch instead of you eating it. There would be also be nuts, and edible starch from the pith of the sago palm. Find a pointy stick and roast things.

Horserider
01-01-2009, 03:48 AM
What kinds of things can you get from tidal pools? I'm searching google, but not finding much.

Mumut
01-01-2009, 04:39 AM
The seeds in bread fruit can be boiled and eaten. I used to serve them as nibblies when guests came around. They need salt, though, or they're pretty bland. The leaves of the tooleep, aupa and apika trees are eaten but those are the local Sepik names - I don't know the botanical names. Pumpkins and the tips of the vine are cooked and eaten. Sago palms grow in most of the Pacific but pound the trunk of the tree (it's like balsa) and wash the resulting pulp well or it is poisonous. Sago grubs can be eaten, just look for the borer holes in the trunk and dig there. Taro - but some taro-like plants are poisonous. (Best have a Britannica with the survivor - washed up after the ship went down).

If the island is volcanic, smack the coconut with a solid rock but don't waste the water - it is very good drinking, especially from green coconuts. Coral atols would be a problem for hard stone or rock. Turtle eggs and even a turtle if you can catch one. Sea urchins and sea slugs but you'd better look up a good chinese cookbook to see how to prepare them. Green ants can be eaten. Taste a bit like citrus but they can bite so beware. There is a juicy black spider the school children in the Fly River area eat but I was never tempted to find out which one. Make a fishing net out of vines and wade out in a small river mouth to encircle trevally, whiting, flathead. Flying fox is often eaten smoked but you really need Worcester sauce to go with it. I don't know how to spell it but the 'torn' tree has really sweet fruit. Similar in taste and presentation to lychee but with a smooth skin. Green tree snakes are not poisonous and taste really good as do the blue necked marsh birds with red fleshy flaps on the beak. I like them better than chicken. Cockatoos are virtually inedible. I couldn't get my teeth into the meat at all but I suppose if you had a knife you could shred it. Wild honey could get a few laughs if you like your MC to be stung to pieces. Birds like gaura pidgeons, cassowaries and bush turkeys live mainly on the ground. Don't get too close to the cassowary, though. They can kill a man with their claws. Tree kangaroos, possums, mumuts (but please don't eat me) are small animals which can be trapped by noticing strongish branches from one tree to the next and setting traps using thin vines to make a noose which you hang over the path or lay on it and hope the animal trips it. Dig holes and cover with thin twigs and leaf litter for wild pig traps.

Look around for stones. Shape them and tie them to stout sticks to make axes or clubs. Shards can be used to scrape meat off hides. Stones from inland (river or sea stones can explode when placed in a fire) can be heated and placed inside a piglet which burried wrapped in leaves to cook. If you cook poultry this way, add in sweet potato and coconut cream (scraped coconut flesh that is squeezed to get the white liquid). For the best results, pandanus nuts should be smoked for two weeks but they can be eaten raw (I've never tried them raw and I can't stand them smoked but my wife and son love them smoked).

Shellfish. Stand in the sand and squirm your feet until they sink. Sometimes you come across a bed of pippies. Boil these. Some tribes don't know how to make clay pots and they sort of steam their food, wrapping it in banana leaves and stuffing these in hollow bamboo sections to cook them. Find a concave shaped rock near the beach and make salt by evaporating sea water. If clay is found, make pots. Wet the surface with water from washing sago to make a glaze.

Some Fijian islands have goats. Islands occupied by the Japanese in WWII have giant land snails, taken with them for a food source. Manus Island is even rumoured to have monkeys introduced for that reason. Some small finches build grass nests on the ground. They have only one entrance. In the Sepik the kids run around torching the front entrance to as many as possible before the alarm is raised and the birds fly off. They go back for the charred little bodies and eat them whole!

Your MC could find relief from the horrors of his/her situation by finding betel nuts and chewing them. Octopus will squeeze into holes in the reef and can be found at low tide. A stick sharpened to have a barbed point and hardened in the fire can be used. Shells can be shaped into fish hooks. For really small fish, just the flash of the hook could be enough to attract the fish. Green turks-head shells are so tasty. Place them on the coals of the fire, entrance up. They cook in their own juice. They're like chewy prawns but much nicer! But be careful collecting shells. Many have a poison dart which is absolutely deadly.

Anyway, that's just a few things off the top of my head.

MissKris
01-01-2009, 10:47 AM
The roe (eggs) of a sea urchin are a delicacy. Mussels, abalone and crab are more tidepool options. Possibly your character will find arrowroot which has a starcy, potato-like root that can be eaten raw, but tastes better boiled. The Batoko Plum is a tree with an edible plum-like fruit with six seeds that is native to the Philippines.

BTW, the sap from the breadfruit tree is basically glue and can be used to catch small birds for food. Simply smear it on branches and when birds land they get stuck.

BAY
01-01-2009, 11:04 AM
Wow, Mumut that was a lesson in island survival, and I was going to suggest that Horserider watch Tom Hanks in Castaway.