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Yeshanu
12-26-2008, 07:47 PM
So yesterday I was driving the kid and her bf back to his house, and we were talking about her sleep habits, which are okay by her but make it difficult for anyone else to share a bed with her.

To put it mildly, she's a restless sleeper and always has been.

But then the bf says something that has caused me some concern. He tells me that she'll snore and breathe for quite a while, then stop breathing for about thirty seconds or so, then start snoring and breathing normally again.

She doesn't have a personal physician at this point in time (there's been a shortage in our area for years), but helping her find one is at the top of my list for the new year, and this will definitely be mentioned once she has one, but just how concerned should I be in the meantime?

Fenika
12-26-2008, 07:49 PM
I believe that is sleep apnea (or similar) and can lead to not getting the sleep you need everyyy night. Ew.

Google will tell you more about sleep apnea and the similar disorders...

Beach Bunny
12-26-2008, 07:51 PM
That sounds like sleep apnea. Here's a link to webmd http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea

Calla Lily
12-26-2008, 07:56 PM
Yep, Yeshanu, that's just sleep apnea. Easily fixed with an overnight hookup to machines and a CPAP or BiPAP (the DH has the BiPAP). You do need a doctor for that, but she'll be fine and won't believe her energy and how good she'll feel when she gets used to the PAP machine. :)

Yeshanu
12-26-2008, 08:01 PM
Yep, Yeshanu, that's just sleep apnea. Easily fixed with an overnight hookup to machines and a CPAP or BiPAP (the DH has the BiPAP). You do need a doctor for that, but she'll be fine and won't believe her energy and how good she'll feel when she gets used to the PAP machine. :)

Sounds like you're talking from experience here. :)

I did a quick read of the site BB linked to. Thing is, she doesn't really have any of the risk factors for sleep apnea, except sleeping on her back. And I'm not even sure she does that any more.

Definitely something to see the doctor about, though. I know her poor sleeping does affect her energy and such--she needs about nine hours of sleep in order to function.

Greenwolf103
12-26-2008, 08:10 PM
Everybody's different on how much sleep we all need to function with, Ruth, but I second the notion on her seeing a doc about this. That doesn't sound like something to overlook or not worry about. Not saying you SHOULD worry, or anything. I think all will be okay until the point you can get her to a doctor. But I do agree you should make sure it's mentioned to a physician.

Sending ya good vibes. :Hug2:

Fenika
12-26-2008, 08:10 PM
Risk factors are relative things.
And there are similar disorders as I mentioned. Let us know what you find out :)

Maryn
12-26-2008, 10:27 PM
Sleep apnea is real, real common, and if she were getting so little sleep because of it that she needed CPAP or other treatment immediately, she'd be so sleep-deprived she could barely function. Her employer or instructors would note poor performance, she'd be drowsy and/or grouchy, and show all the other signs of serious sleep shortage, like poor motor skills, lousy attention span, many minor car accidents, and a seriously short temper.

Odds are she's got sleep apnea, but falls back to sleep immediately after each waking. She can train herself not to sleep on her back, which helps enormously. Using a huge basting stitch, sew a big old pocket on the back of whatever she wears to sleep in. Put a tennis ball inside it. Usually in two weeks, the person has learned not to stay on his/her back more than momentarily, and the pocket can be removed--but saved for future retraining if necessary.

Mr. Maryn has sleep apnea and this is all he has to do.

Maryn, who sleeps lightly, too

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-26-2008, 11:40 PM
Ol' Boy has sleep apnea, too. Same symptoms, a little more severe. If not treated, it can lead to all manner of health troubles - fix is easy. The CPAP machine saved Ol' Boy's life and my sanity. It's a good thing.