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Schussman
12-26-2008, 11:09 AM
Tex Ware

has anyone heard anything about this publishing company. i searched the threads until i was blurry-eyed, so i may have missed it.

i found them on-line. it seems like a good site, but i've been down that scary road before. i thought PA, and SBP had a nice site too!

they linked me here, for which i am grateful! you all steared me clear of strategic books. they were eager to get a hold of my novel. fortunately, they couldn't pry my fingers open to take my 3 thousand dollars (to have it edited by their 'prefered' editors).

ejket
12-26-2008, 12:28 PM
http://www.tex-ware.com/

Looks like the usual waste of time. POD. No distribution. No promotion.

James D. Macdonald
12-26-2008, 03:41 PM
If you have been rejected or not even considered by a large publishing house because you are unknown then Tex Ware Publishing wants to see your work. We can’t guarantee that we will publish your book but we will not reject you simply because you haven’t been published before.


Big publishing houses don't reject you (or not even consider you) because you're unknown. There are a lot of reasons your book could be rejected (see Slushkiller (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/004641.html)), but being unknown isn't one of them.


Make no mistake – we are not a vanity or self publishing company. You do not pay us one cent to get your book published. You will not be labeled as a self published author.


PublishAmerica makes the exact same claim. I'm sure that it'll be equally true with these guys.



Have you ever seen a Tex Ware book in a bookstore? Have you ever personally read a Tex Ware book? Do you know anyone who has?



What makes you think that anyone will read your book either?

CaoPaux
12-26-2008, 08:43 PM
It should surprise no one that the sole author is also the owner.

Rule of thumb #524: Avoid amateur POD houses, especially when founded as a self-publishing concern.

triceretops
12-27-2008, 04:18 AM
I noticed that too, Cao.

Tri

Schussman
12-27-2008, 05:05 AM
thanks everyone, that answered my question.

CaoPaux
01-29-2010, 09:12 AM
Has more authors now. .pdf previews available.

SueMW
02-07-2010, 12:47 AM
Hello,

I am one of Tex-Ware's authors. Before signing with Tex-Ware I had two rhyming picture books published with two mid-size houses.

What I will tell you is that my experience with Ray Ruppert of Tex-Ware has been quite positive! I found his name on the web and contacted (via email) one of his authors. She had such nice things to say about her experience, that I decided to submit a mid-grade novel that I co-authored with my husband.

I will also tell you that I have a rather famous agent/Emmy winner who could not sell my projects. We all want the big houses! But, I found that it doesn't always happen.

As far as Tex-Ware and Ray Ruppert, he produced a book that we are proud of. Ray worked seriously and put many hours into editing. We found his assistance and patience to be one of a kind! This I must add, was new to me!

Because he believed in our project, we are now able to visit schools in hope that our story "Chapter two: The Magic in Baseball" helps children better understand themselves and each other. We are proud to have our book as part of a book club and chosen reader for several New York schools. Please visit my website and see us on New York 1.

Ray is upfront, keeps his word and tells it like it is. As far as marketing, I have always been on my own because reaching children is the goal of both my husband and myself. Being former teachers, we want to reach out to children.

If you feel that you ONLY want to be published by a BIG house, good luck and I hope you are. Know that it is difficult and may not happen and that there are ways to reach your goals. Do your research, connect with authors who have been published and ask them what they think. I can guarantee that any author you contact on Ray's website will speak highly of him.

I will be doing a signing in Spring at Barnes and Nobel in Staten Island. I don't have a date yet, but will let you know. Feel free to visit my website www.swigden.com and take a look around. If you have a child in your life between 9-13 you may want to order a copy of "Chapter Two:The Magic in Baseball." It really is a story for all ages. It's available at Barnes and Noble website and amazon.

I hoped I have helped some of you. Good luck to all and my best wishes for success.

Kindest Regards, Susan Wigden

Kateness
02-08-2010, 12:00 AM
Before signing with Tex-Ware I had two rhyming picture books published with two mid-size houses.

You know, Amazon says you've got one book not published by Tex Ware, and three books published by them.

SueMW
02-08-2010, 01:58 AM
Hi Kateness!

I have seen mistakes with Amazon. In fact they have a book under my name that I did not write. My books are "Suppose" Tidewater 2005 (now taken over by Schiffer Publishing)
"A Mitzva for Zelda" Pitspopany Press 2008 and ""Chapter two:The Magic in Basball" 2009 and "Suppose at the Supermarket" 2009 from Tex-Ware. Thanks for telling me.

Arkie
02-08-2010, 04:07 AM
I fail to find a reference to length of contract. What is it?

SueMW
02-08-2010, 05:58 AM
Hi Arkie,
"3 years ** subject to renew for one year term if neither party delivers 30 day written notice to terminate this agreement."

Arkie
02-08-2010, 06:46 AM
Hi Arkie,
"3 years ** subject to renew for one year term if neither party delivers 30 day written notice to terminate this agreement."

Thanks for the info.

Donna Pudick
02-08-2010, 08:34 PM
They say there are no hidden fees, but they do have charges. Look the website over carefully. They charge to register the copyright, if you don't do it yourself and they charge to get you a USBN # if you don't do it yourself, and a bunch of other little things.

rayruppert
02-08-2010, 08:37 PM
Hi All,

If you have questions, you can contact me. I really do respond to email contacts from my web page. http://www.tex-ware.com/Contact_Us/contact_us.html

Thanks Susan for your good words.

I haven’t charged to publish anyone’s book. I don’t do a bait and switch scheme. However, I will say that Tex Ware isn't for everyone. I have turned down more books than I have published. I've told some that they shouldn't come to me until they have exhausted the big publishers.

If there is something on my web site that you believe is misleading or inaccurate, please let me know. I want to be honest and above board in what I represent that I can or can’t do.

Ray Ruppert
Tex Ware Publishing

rayruppert
02-08-2010, 08:44 PM
They say there are no hidden fees, but they do have charges. Look the website over carefully. They charge to register the copyright, if you don't do it yourself and they charge to get you a USBN # if you don't do it yourself, and a bunch of other little things.

These are not hidden - they are out in the open. Since the author retains the copyright, not Tex Ware, then the copyright fee is the Author's responsibity. I will do it for them if they want.

I do not change to get a USBN # you misread that. USBN application is free to publishers. I simply tell you that you have to submit the finished book to the Library of Congress.

The bunch of other things, chagres for making changes after the proof has been printed is to make sure that the Author has proofed the PDF copies.

None of these things are money making schemes.

Any other things you would like me to clarify?

Ray Ruppert
Tex Ware Publishing

Momento Mori
02-08-2010, 09:17 PM
SueMW:
I will also tell you that I have a rather famous agent/Emmy winner who could not sell my projects. We all want the big houses! But, I found that it doesn't always happen

Hi, Sue, and welcome to AW.

What did your agent think about your giving your books to Tex Ware? Have you been paid an advance for your books? Will your books be available within bookstores (i.e. has Tex Ware negotiated a distribution deal with bookstores so that they will carry your book within stores on shelves, rather than merely having the capability of ordering your book)? What publicity has Tex Ware done for your book and how much publicity have you done yourself? Have you had to spend money to do your own publicity?


rayruppert:
Since the author retains the copyright, not Tex Ware, then the copyright fee is the Author's responsibity. I will do it for them if they want.

Hi, Ray, and welcome to AW.

While copyright remains with the author, it is common practice for the publisher to carry out the registrations without charging back to the author.


rayruppert:
Any other things you would like me to clarify?

Why does your contract take exclusive worldwide rights on a manuscript when you are only publishing within the United States?

MM

Gravity
02-08-2010, 09:26 PM
:popcorn:

SueMW
02-08-2010, 09:43 PM
Hi Momento Mori,
My wonderful agent has advised me to do what I feel is best for me and yes he agrees with me. The market is rough and if reaching children is my main concern and not making LOTS of money (sure we all would like to) then to go for it! His remark, "Good for you?" This may not be what others want. It is what I want. No, I did not get an advance from Tex-Ware neither for "Suppose" with Tidewater Publishers, now Schiffer) Ray was honest from the get go about publicity. I do not pay anyone for that-I do that my contacting schools, my local newspapers. I even got myself to go to the St. Jude Charity event and my book Suppose(Tidewater/Schiffer) raised money for children. I found that even my other mid-size publishers did little for me. Only difference was that Ray was available to help me out and they weren't! And sadly enough I believed that my other publishers would have my books in stores- No way! I had to contact stores on my own, do a reading and then some of my books would be hanging around for a while. If any small author thinks their books are going to be displayed on shelves all the time, well...

Anyone who views my website should know that all places I have visited and my interations with children for all of my books have been accomplished by myself. For me the best part about being an author is staying in touch with the children. And though I would love to stay here all day, I do have author visits. I just wanted to help out and get my feelings about how wonderful Tex-Ware is to work with. So long and Good luck to all!

rayruppert
02-16-2010, 05:53 AM
Why does your contract take exclusive worldwide rights on a manuscript when you are only publishing within the United States?

MM

Just being cautious. If there is demand for the book in the US that warrants an international publication then I can arrange for that. However I have received requests to publish books for authors from other countries. It isn’t practical for me to publish books in the US for an author who is in South Korea, for example. That is a job for a publisher that can handle the international bookkeeping.

M.R.J. Le Blanc
02-16-2010, 06:33 AM
That doesn't sound right.

Terie
02-16-2010, 10:57 AM
That doesn't sound right.

Nope, it doesn't. I live in one country and my publisher is in another, and that fact has nothing to do with anything. They send me checks in US$ and it's my responsbility to deal with them. I get US tax documents because the publisher is legally required to produce them. The publisher isn't required to notify any tax authorities in the country in which I live of my income; I report it on my tax forms myself. There's no 'international accounting' my publisher has to do.

(Full disclosure: I'm a US citizen and have a US bank account into which I can deposit the checks, and I need the tax docs to file my US taxes. But if none of that were the case, my publisher wouldn't do anything differently from what they do already.)

There are challenges for me that have to do with living a country different from the one I'm published in, but not for my publisher.

Sounds like someone hasn't done their research.

Momento Mori
02-16-2010, 02:33 PM
rayruppert:
If there is demand for the book in the US that warrants an international publication then I can arrange for that. However I have received requests to publish books for authors from other countries. It isn’t practical for me to publish books in the US for an author who is in South Korea, for example. That is a job for a publisher that can handle the international bookkeeping.

Worldwide rights have nothing to do with accountancy or taxation and I'm at a loss to understand why you would even begin to think that they do.

If you take worldwide rights in a manuscript, then you have the rights to try and sell that manuscript to any of the publishing territories. OUP in the UK usually takes this right because they can make money by selling the rights onto other publishers who they have links with (and forward advances, minus commission to the author).

If an author based in South Korea wants you to publish their book in the USA, then presumably, you would need to take American rights for that book. There is then nothing to stop you from publishing and selling that book in the normal way and paying royalties to the author in the normal way.

Profit and loss is recorded in the same way in your accounts and you remain subject to US taxation.

The author takes the royalties/an advance (if relevant) and remains subject to South Korean taxation. As terie says, it's the author's responsibility to sort out their own taxation liability.

How many international publishing deals have you brokered for your authors?

MM

SueMW
02-17-2010, 02:35 AM
My decision to post a comment here was only to share my positive experience and give Ray Ruppert the praise he so deserves. He is certainly entitled to put anything he desires in his contract. Tex-Ware may not be the publisher for you, as Ray will tell his authors from the start, but I am insulted(for him) by what I see as some comments that appear vainglorious/supercilious. When someone comes on these forums and explains themselves,(such as he did and I admire that) I do notice that they seem to get attacked in an ever-so subtle way. As for me, I shall leave for good and wish all of you success and a sense of learned respect.

rayruppert
02-17-2010, 03:15 AM
Regarding worldwide rights – I had to think this over again as I looked at my last post and had to agree that what I stated didn’t really express my reason for asking for worldwide copyrights and I confused it by bringing in the South Korea connection.

I do know what it takes – documentation wise – to send royalties to someone in another country. The bigger issue is sending books to the author, getting them through customs and paying for shipping. I have done the research on this.
If a person has published a book in another country and they come to me to do it in the US I would turn them down because I would not be able to give them the exposure here. It wouldn’t be fair to them. They need a publisher that can do the same for them as they had in the other country.
If a person comes to me and hasn’t published before, then I usually spend a tremendous amount of time editing and working with the author to get the book ready for print. If that author then takes the book and gets it printed in another country, they have reaped benefits and I believe I have the right to negotiate with the author to receive some benefit as well.
I hope this is clearer.

FOTSGreg
02-17-2010, 03:21 AM
So long, SueMW.

If you had decided to stay a bit longer you might have actually given yourself the chance to learn a thing or two around here.

The fact of the matter is that there are scammers out there and many of the people taken in by the scammers are the first to rise in their defense because, well, they've been scammed and they feel defensive about it. I'm not stating that Mr. Ruppert is a scammer, but I'm reserving judgement. Based on his statements thus far in thus thread, I am very, very leery. I admire his willingness to defend his position here, however. Most scammers wouldn't bother.

Sorry, Sue. You sound like a victim.

Stick around and learn a few things from the folks here. You'll lose the victimhood really, really fast.

FOTSGreg
02-17-2010, 03:27 AM
rayruppert said, The bigger issue is sending books to the author, getting them through customs and paying for shipping. I have done the research on this.

Really, Ray? Honestly, I have shipped CDs holding computer programs around the world and I have never, ever, had a problem shipping them anywhere. I've shipped to Japan, Australia, the Ukraine, and Romania to name just a few.

Not once has there ever been a problem with customs.

I cannot imagine that shipping books would be any more complicated than shipping a CD with programs burned on it.

Unimportant
02-17-2010, 07:20 AM
I'm in Australasia, and North American publishers and distributors have shipped boxes of books to my house without any problem. The postage probably costs them more than domestic shipping would have, but none of them seemed to mind. Any customs issues would be mine, not theirs, but I've not run across any.

I would guess that authors in some countries could experience trouble with customs at their border if their US publisher were shipping them material that customs considered objectionable; for example, gay erotica or porn.

Unimportant
02-17-2010, 07:29 AM
Regarding worldwide rights – I had to think this over again as I looked at my last post and had to agree that what I stated didn’t really express my reason for asking for worldwide copyrights and I confused it by bringing in the South Korea connection.

(snip)

If a person comes to me and hasn’t published before, then I usually spend a tremendous amount of time editing and working with the author to get the book ready for print. If that author then takes the book and gets it printed in another country, they have reaped benefits and I believe I have the right to negotiate with the author to receive some benefit as well.

Do you lease publishing rights or take copyright?

If you take exclusive worldwide rights, how can the author take the book and get it printed in another country? That would put them in breach of contract.

My understanding is that a publisher could
a) Take copyright. You own all rights including derivative rights, and you don't even have to put the author's name on the book if you don't want to.
or
b) Take exclusive worldwide rights. Only you can distribute books anywhere in the world.
or
c) Take primary North American rights and subsidiary other-territory rights with the latter having a pre-set publisher/author split. Only you can distribute books in North America. Only you can sublicense the rights to a publisher in another country to print and sell the book, and the proceeds from this are split between you and the author.
or
d) Take primary North American rights and leave other territories to the author. He can then license the rights to publishers in other countries at his discretion and keep any profit.

Could you clarify what rights you contract?

Momento Mori
02-17-2010, 03:17 PM
SueMW:
My decision to post a comment here was only to share my positive experience and give Ray Ruppert the praise he so deserves.

That's cool and something that we welcome. Thank you for taking the time to do so.


SueMW:
He is certainly entitled to put anything he desires in his contract.

Yes, I agree that Ray is entitled to put anything he wants in his contract, just as you are free to agree whatever you want to in a contract and I am free to point out any concerns that I would have with a contract.


SueMW:
I am insulted(for him) by what I see as some comments that appear vainglorious/supercilious. When someone comes on these forums and explains themselves,(such as he did and I admire that) I do notice that they seem to get attacked in an ever-so subtle way.

Which comments do you think are vainglorious and/or supercilious? Personally, I think that the questions here have been pertinent and the points made are relevant. No one here has been rude or behaved in an insulting manner to you or to Ray but maybe we have raised points that you don't really want to think about. You might not like that, but there's a subtle difference between not liking what people are saying and having their attacking you.


SueMW:
As for me, I shall leave for good and wish all of you success and a sense of learned respect.

It's a shame that you want to leave as there are other Forums here that you may find more to your liking.

Best of luck to you for the future.


rayruppert:
I do know what it takes – documentation wise – to send royalties to someone in another country. The bigger issue is sending books to the author, getting them through customs and paying for shipping. I have done the research on this.

I appreciate that shipping overseas is likely to be more expensive, but I don't see what it's got to do with taking worldwide publishing rights from an author. When an author grants you worldwide rights, then you are taking the rights to publish that book anywhere in the world. Posting and packing and customs overseas really does not come into the equation.

In any event, surely you only accept authors who you think that you can market and sell within the United States? In that case, presumably you're accepting authors where you will earn a revenue stream from selling their books - a revenue stream that should cover the postage and packing for sending any author copies overseas.


rayruppert:
If a person has published a book in another country and they come to me to do it in the US I would turn them down because I would not be able to give them the exposure here. It wouldn’t be fair to them. They need a publisher that can do the same for them as they had in the other country.

I'm sorry, but I don't understand this either. How would the exposure differ for an author based in the US and an author based overseas? The only difference I would anticipate is in the amount of author promotion within the United States that the author can do if they are based in another country - but this would surely be offset by the marketing, promotion and distribution that you already have in place for your US authors?


rayruppert:
If a person comes to me and hasn’t published before, then I usually spend a tremendous amount of time editing and working with the author to get the book ready for print. If that author then takes the book and gets it printed in another country, they have reaped benefits and I believe I have the right to negotiate with the author to receive some benefit as well.

Okay, this I understand. Thank you.

MM

CaoPaux
05-29-2016, 06:46 PM
Has reverted to self-publishing only (per home page):


Tex Ware published a number of quality books for adults and children then transferred these books to another company in February of 2014. Over the past two years, several of the books have been taken out of print (or unpublished as eBooks). Tex-ware has also aided some of the authors in self publishing some or all of their books. Therefore it is no longer practical to list those books and authors on this website.

Tex Ware is now publishing books written by Ray Ruppert, MATS. ...