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Danalynn
12-22-2008, 05:14 AM
I was wondering if anyone can tell me what state is considered THE most "Southern" state as far as accents and customs go?


And is South Carolina considered a "Southern" state like the way Georgia or Alabama are? Would they speak with any kind of a southern accent and/or have southern customs in S. Carolina similar to what they have in Georgia or Alabama?

How about Tennessee? Same questions apply to that state.



Speaking as an Ohioan that doesn't know much about the south, ANY help in this matter will be greatly appreciated. LOL!
:Sun:

alleycat
12-22-2008, 05:19 AM
The "deep south" states have traditionally been Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Tennessee is a southern state, but with somewhat different traditions and culture than the deep south states. The people in rural Tennessee have more of a pronounced southern accent than those from the more urban areas. If you need any more info on Tennessee let me know; I'm a native.

Shady Lane
12-22-2008, 05:19 AM
South Carolinians (and North Carolinian's almost as much) definitely have strong southern accents/southern ways.

Don't know a thing about Tennessee, sorry.

trickywoo
12-22-2008, 06:40 AM
I've lived in both Tennessee and now live in South Carolina, and SC is definitely more "southern". If I remember right, Tennessee folks think of themselves as the northerners of the south, if that makes sense. When I think of Tennessee, I think "country", but not necessarily southern.

When we first moved to SC, we had a bit of culture shock. The accents are definitely thick and there are hints of the old south everywhere - especially in places like Charleston. In fact, if you can believe it - I still can't - they still fly the confederate flag in front of the state capitol here in Columbia.

Anyway, hope this helps!

Beach Bunny
12-22-2008, 06:58 AM
I was wondering if anyone can tell me what state is considered THE most "Southern" state as far as accents and customs go?


And is South Carolina considered a "Southern" state like the way Georgia or Alabama are? Would they speak with any kind of a southern accent and/or have southern customs in S. Carolina similar to what they have in Georgia or Alabama?

How about Tennessee? Same questions apply to that state.



Speaking as an Ohioan that doesn't know much about the south, ANY help in this matter will be greatly appreciated. LOL!
:Sun:
The regional cultural differences in the Southern US which is east of the Mississippi River and South of the Ohio River plus Texas and Virginia are related more to geography not state lines. So, you have the Appalachians, the plains, the coastal areas, the hills, etc. If you look at a map which indicates geology and elevation you can figure it out. The accents are slightly different in each area and there are some cultural differences.

"Most southern" really depends on what you are looking for. Using stereotypes: Hillbilly, redneck, good old boy, plantation, etc.

Florida is mostly a Southern state, but the urban areas are more a mixed bag. With all the people who have moved to the state since central AC was invented there are few native born Floridians over the age of 40.

Cyia
12-22-2008, 07:03 AM
Texas isn't deep south, but we definitely consider ourselves southern. And the Texas Twang is one of the distinct accents of the south.

South Carolina is definitely part of the south.

dalex
12-22-2008, 07:08 AM
Louisiana is definitely Deep South, especially in the southern portion. We tend to think those not along the Gulf coast are yankees (yes I know it's not true and we don't consider FL & TX Deep South). I agree with Beach Bunny ""Most southern" really depends on what you are looking for. Using stereotypes: Hillbilly, redneck, good old boy, plantation, etc." It really depends on "what kind of southern" you're looking for. Also, the cities can be just as different as states, some are "more southern" than others. I'm from Louisiana so if you need any information, let me know.

perfectisafault
12-22-2008, 07:30 AM
Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Georgia (though Atlanta is pretty "non-Southern") is what I would consider "the South" (I'm from Mississippi), though parts of Florida (i.e. the northern part/the panhandle), North/South Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas would qualify.

GirlWithPoisonPen
12-22-2008, 07:38 AM
It depends on how you are going to define "southern." And are we talking white Southern or African American Southern?

Old South is Charleston and Savannah.

New South is Atlanta.

Cajun-Creole Southern is New Orleans and Louisiana.

Texas is a completely different brand of Southern.

psykeout
12-22-2008, 01:09 PM
Coming from Georgia and visiting most of the places that have been discussed, I have to say that outside of Birmingham, Alabama is the most southern state I've ever been to.

South Carolina is a close second, but Alabama takes the cake.

Teleute
12-22-2008, 01:35 PM
I'm from Mississippi, and I agree that the "most southern" state (/city/county/etc.) depends on what you classify as southern. We're all the most southern in our own ways. You can think of these as stereotypes, but I like to think of them as cultures.

Think that southern is country music, cowboy hats, and big hair? East Texas or Nashville.

Harmonica-playing folks in the hills that really love mud-riding (think Appalachia but with a twang)? Central and northeast Tennessee.

Blues music, guitars, Highway 61, and lots of cotton? West Mississippi, near the river, and Memphis for the urban setting.

Old plantation South? Charleston, Natchez, Savannah.

Uber southern hospitality? East Mississippi and west Alabama.

Swamp living, gator hunting, boats as primary form of transit, gumbo? South Louisiana; parts of north-central Florida for all but that last.

Other distinct regions of the South that I don't know well enough to describe are north Louisiana/south Arkansas, Georgia generally, and South Carolina.

As far as accents go, the further west the accent becomes more of a twang, and the further east the accent becomes more of a drawl. Mississippi is right in the middle, with the most generic southern accent. But most of what you hear in movies is either the Georgia drawl or the Texas twang, regardless of the setting.

Saanen
12-22-2008, 04:05 PM
Most of what you hear in the movies is northerners pretending to be southern. :)I agree with the others who've said that "most southern" depends on what you're thinking of. I'm from East Tennessee, in the Appalachians--think hillbillies. If you've seen The Client, the little boy's accent is accurate for East Tennessee; in fact, he's from Knoxville.When I think "most southern sounding," I think Georgia or Alabama, especially rural and especially old folks who haven't had as much outside influence on their accents.

alleycat
12-22-2008, 04:34 PM
I'm going to disagree with Teleute somewhat; those are pretty stereotypical descriptions. For example, almost no one in Nashville wears a cowboy hat unless they're either perfroming on stage, working at one of the tourist shops, or wearing it as a "costume" if they're going to someplace like the Wildhorse Saloon--in much the same way someone might wear a poodle skirt if they were going to a fifties-style sock hop party.

There's often a grain of truth in stereotypes, but you have to be careful using such details in a book; it's very easy for a writer to end up looking foolish if that's the only thing they go by.

Don
12-22-2008, 05:19 PM
Just as in other parts of the country, rural areas are more 'whatever' than their urban counterparts, too. Atlanta resembles New York City more than it resembles Vidalia, GA.

Teleute
12-22-2008, 05:33 PM
I'm going to disagree with Teleute somewhat; those are pretty stereotypical descriptions. For example, almost no one in Nashville wears a cowboy hat unless they're either perfroming on stage, working at one of the tourist shops, or wearing it as a "costume" if they're going to someplace like the Wildhorse Saloon--in much the same way someone might wear a poodle skirt if they were going to a fifties-style sock hop party.

There's often a grain of truth in stereotypes, but you have to be careful using such details in a book; it's very easy for a writer to end up looking foolish if that's the only thing they go by.

Obviously, "cowboy hat" and "blues music" do not describe even a tiny bit of what these regions are, BUT the OP was asking for the "most southern" place. It depends on how you define southern. Cowboy hats is one way of internally defining southern, like blues music, like swamps, like mud-riding, like big hair, etc., etc.

I'm defining in the opposite direction. "Cowboy hats" describes Nashville and Houston a hell of a lot more than it describes New Orleans.

The purpose here is to derive what information the OP wants, not dispense information to the OP. If that makes sense. If you wanted to write a novel about, say, racial violence in the 1960's, your setting needs may differ from someone who wants to write about big-haired housewives in the suburbs. Hence the prompts.

People in Nashville don't wear cowboy hats all the time, but if one wanted to write with country music as a major part of their setting... well, that's a logical place to do it.

alleycat
12-22-2008, 05:46 PM
That's just it . . . cowboy hats do not describe the real Nashville. No more than Gone With the Wind describes modern-day Atlanta. I meant only that I thought your descriptions of the various regions were way too simplistic, and sort of "outward looking in" rather than being intimately familiar with the areas.

ETA: I just saw the last edit to your post. Yes, I would agree with you in that case; if one were writing about the country music business, then Nashville AND cowboy hats would both fit the bill nicely.

Chase
12-22-2008, 09:37 PM
It's all relative. To folks along the Milk River and the Highline of Montana:

"Southerners" live along the Yellowstone River of southern Montana. Yes, Billings people talk funny.

Wyoming and Colorado are the "The South." The accents make listening a real chore.

Texas is "The Deep South." You cain't hardly unnerstanem.

"The Mason Jar Line" is the scientific means to determine South from Deep South. If a Mason Jar of crickwater will hang on a clothesline all year and not crack, you are in The Deep South.

Sunkissed27f
12-22-2008, 10:06 PM
I'm from Alabama.......we are the 'Heart of Dixie'.

We are the heart of the South, that is.

It can get even more complicated...with what region of the state you live in as well.

I grew up in Southeast Alabama. Noticeable southern accents of course, but not too bad really. I lived in the Southwest part of Alabama for 2 yrs... south of Mobile and close to the Gulf/Beaches and their accents aren't that bad. But they have a lot of Snow Birds there. People from the North that settle for the beach environment without going all the way to Florida.

Now I occupy the North-Mid eastern part of Alabama close to Huntsville and the peoples accents here are just awful....very country. Haha. I think it's because we are so close to TENNESSEE.

I have heard Tennessee people talk and I have to say I think Tennessee is the most Country/Southern state.

Tennessee is the heart of country music (though there are people from all over producing "country music" now)....it's the heart of good southern horses...You can argue that the west have the best horses...yeah maybe...but having been in the horse business as long as I have...the best stock I've seen have come out of Tennessee. And not just Walking horses either...good quarter horse stock too.

Kentucky is also pretty country/southern...no one mentioned it did they? But they have all those high folluton folks, because of the Derby/races.

As for the Carolina's...I have only ever been to North Carolina.
I didn't notice much of an accent...I didn't notice any backwoods country folk, like in Tennessee and Alabama. Actually North Carolina seemed pretty tame compared to North Alabama and Tennessee.

So there that's my opinion.

As for the least country/southern state in the South...it's FLORIDA! :D

Also...I don't have a hard/deep/drawling/twangy accent...mine is neutral. So being from the Southeastern most part of Alabama originally (think crammed up next to GA, and FLA and can't go any further Alabama) may mean I have more of a drawl than a twang....but most Northern people and Western people don't think I have much of an accent. Neither do I.
I think accents are a bad indicator of how country/southern a state is.

I majored in English/Lit and read a lot...I think this helped me in pronouncing my words fully and accurately...properly. ;) Though there may be people who talk worse than ,I who have done the same. Who knows.....I also think being a product of your raise....affects your accent and how country you are...not just where you live. If your Dad is from New York and your Mother is from LA and yet you grew up in Memphis, Tennessee all your life...born and raised...what does that make you? Will you have a southern accent or something in between a North/West Coast and Country accent? Who knows?

alleycat
12-22-2008, 10:14 PM
I guess if I tried to average all the traits of the various southern states, from Texas to the Carolinas and Virginia, and from Tennessee down to Florida, and then compared this average to each of the states . . . my guess would be that Georgia would come closest to being the "typical southern state".

But it is just a "thumbnail" guess.

StephanieFox
12-22-2008, 10:19 PM
To a good ear, there are dozens of accents in the American South depending of geography (mountain, delta, flatland, western desert), the Europeans who where there first (French, Spanish, English, Irish), race and other things.

Northerners consider Texas to be southern, but not 'Dixie' southern. There's a difference between the cowboy hat culture and the seed-cap culture, that is farmer or rancher.

Black southern is a whole different animal. I can't tell you much about that.

Texas is kind of the South, but it's kind of it's own thing, with elements of southern and elements of western.It's a difference between "Yeeee-haw!" or "Yaaaa-hooo!"

There are thing southerners do that completely appall northerners, and vice versa. Southerners who want to move to the big city do not think New York, L.A. or Chicago, but Atlanta. In some ways, these are two different countries the north and south, maybe the west is a third. Southerners are very proud of of their history, even the part of history where they fought a war against the United States and lost. On the other hand, these are the people who will proudly wave the American flag, send their kids off to war in Iraq and call anyone who disagrees with the president, traitors.

There are border states, too with elements of both including Missouri, Tenn., Kansas, West Virginia and the communists of Northern Virginia (this is a joke about Sara Palin...it's just a bit more liberal.)

Southern culture is very polite, proud, religious, stratified, hard-drinking, tea-totaling, hierarcical, violent, rural (even in a lot of cities), and proud of it.

Hope this helps.

p.s.: Southern Florida is not the south as much as it Latin America. By the way, if you are from southern Ohio as your post says, you live in the south. Southern Indiana, too.

tinselcleo
12-22-2008, 11:01 PM
I've lived in Georgia and travelled quite a bit in the South after moving from Ohio (yes, I miss it!!) at the ripe old age of 7.
My take is that Alabama is the "most" southern state. The reason I say Alabama is because there is not the influx of people moving into that state compared to the others; it has kept it's charm. And of all the southerners I have met, Alabamans are the MOST proud of being southern bred. They live and breathe turnip greens, deer meat, BBQ, and whisky. "Sweet Home Alabama" is not just a song....it is their anthem.
That being said, there are extreme southern areas in all states in the South. There are people in south Ga. and south Ala. that I still have a hard time understanding what they say. Whereas old "money" south, South Carolina and certain parts of Atlanta & Savannah, there are old timers I could sit and listen to their drawl for hours.
If you are looking for quaint little southern towns with wide main streets, flowering trees and big front porches, you can find them in Ala, Ga, and SC.
Tn. is considered the south though Chattanooga still reminds me of Pittsburgh. The area between Nashville and Memphis is home to some real southerners, but there are plenty of northerners who have moved it. Memphis is as southern as Charleston and both of these two are much more southern than Atlanta. Some of the best southern food and music hails from Memphis.
I would rank Mississippi as real south too, but there just are not that many people who are crazy about their state, not like Alabama. Matter of fact, most everyone I knew from Miss. always went to Ala. and Auburn's football games...LOL.

Ganymede
12-22-2008, 11:28 PM
As other posters have said, this will depend largely on your application. But the US South is extremely diverse. There are hundreds of accents. A dozen or more dialects at least. And many, many cultures.

Let me give you an analogy to put it into perspective.

Let's say you said that you wanted to know which Native Americans were the most Native American. And you wanted to know which groups had Native American languages/accents, customs, and traditions.

Except for broad anthropological classifications of which populations were in the US before European settlements, lumping them together as a collective is silly. It erases the important distinguishing characteristics that makes each group a rich and important part of our history.

The Dineh (Navajo) in what is now Arizona, New Mexico, and extreme southern Utah will have a very different language and traditions from the Cherokee (some of whom remain in western North Carolina, many of whom were forced to relocate to Oklahoma by walking the Trail Of Tears). Yet both populations are Native American.

The US South varies greatly from region to region. Factors that contribute to this include, but are not limited to:

1. The origins and customs of the "original" settlers.

Some places such as Charleston, SC are a wealth of diverse cultures, including descendents of French Hugenots, and the Gullah from West Africa, many of whom make their livelihood to this day by selling their handmade baskets in the town market using the same techniques their African ancesters have passed down for generations. By contrast, central North Carolina was populated largely by Scots-Irish and Germanic settlers, though there are notable exceptions such as the Moravian settlement in historic Winston-Salem which still exists today.

2. Economic and war history.

The outcome of the War Between The States played a major role in any given area's current economic and political climate. Since some towns like Raleigh and Charlotte were spared most of the brunt of Sherman's army (and the subsequent fires set by the locals to destory supplies so they would not reach Union forces), it positioned them for quicker recovery and the ability to grow -- whereas other areas of the South never have fully recovered.

If, by "most Southern" you mean the closest in traditions and mindsets to the Antebellum era (pre-Civil War), you will probably find pockets of areas in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama that come closest to the bill. But again, there is a lot of diversity there. New Orleans is a blend of cultures like Charleston is, yet it's quite different. Jackson, MS is a thoroughly modern city. The collegiage town of Oxford, MS hosts one of the South's most distinguished universities.

You can make a caricature of someone in a 10-gallon hat sipping juleps on the front porch, but if you want a 3-dimensional character or setting, pick an area of the South and research it. The more you know, the more believable your choices will be. Outside of the United States, people often make reference to someone having "an American accent", and I think few Americans will argue that that is a rather sweeping classification to make. :) A person from Brooklyn, NY will sound drastically different from a native of Madison, Wisconsin, or Boston's Back Bay area.

Same with Southerners.

Incidentally, don't visit Southerners and ask who are the most or best Southerners. It's like asking New Yorkers and Chicagoans who makes the best pizza, or Texans and North Carolinians who makes the best BBQ. You'll start a war. :)

alleycat
12-22-2008, 11:53 PM
BBQ? You can't even mention BBQ within the same state and not expect a fight because each region is different.

Ditto chili in Texas and Oklahoma from what I hear.

Ganymede
12-23-2008, 02:08 AM
BBQ? You can't even mention BBQ within the same state and not expect a fight because each region is different.

Ditto chili in Texas and Oklahoma from what I hear.

Exactly. Or people in the same town. :)

Ucla_sb
12-23-2008, 02:27 AM
im from new orleans and recently moved to MS im not sure what youre asking but if i can help in any way feel free to msg

Appalachian Writer
12-23-2008, 05:52 AM
I'm from Virginia, capital of the Confederacy. Very southern, but like most states, ripe with diversity. Atlanta, at one time, was the quintessential southern city, but now, it's very city-ish in every respect. New Orleans, also very southern, and even now, the old houses that haunt Charles Street whisper of the past. All peoples have accents or dialects, even Ohioans. The mountain dialect of VA or Tennessee. The long drawl of (yes) South Carolinians, Georgians, Mississippi, or Alabama. As for strange customs, I really don't know what you're asking. The Appalachian Mountain dwellers have some customs, but most of the superstitious behaviors and beliefs are certainly things of the past. If you'd like to talk about whatever it is you're asking, I'd be open. PM me.

Danalynn
12-23-2008, 09:04 AM
Thank you ALL so much for the great responses!

:snoopy:

I know it was a pretty broad question (lacking specificity), but I really only needed a broad answer, and I got the answers I was looking for. THANK YOU!


All of this information helps me out tremendously! http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon10.gif Out of all of the "Deep South" states, I've chosen Mississippi (is it still considered The Bible Belt?) as the southern place where my MC was born and raised, thanks to all the great info you've all given me.



Thanks bunches, everyone!

:2angel:

alleycat
12-23-2008, 09:10 AM
Mississippi is definitely part of the so-called "Bible Belt".

Teleute
12-23-2008, 09:28 AM
The collegiage town of Oxford, MS hosts one of the South's most distinguished universities.

Aww, that's where I went. Go Rebels!


You can make a caricature of someone in a 10-gallon hat sipping juleps on the front porch, but if you want a 3-dimensional character or setting, pick an area of the South and research it. The more you know, the more believable your choices will be. Outside of the United States, people often make reference to someone having "an American accent", and I think few Americans will argue that that is a rather sweeping classification to make. :) A person from Brooklyn, NY will sound drastically different from a native of Madison, Wisconsin, or Boston's Back Bay area.

Same with Southerners.

ITA. And for that matter, a lot of shows and movies drastically fail when they are set in New Orleans* or Jackson or Atlanta whathaveyou and the characters have these deep, ridiculously twangy or drawl-y southern accents. Southerners that grow up in urban and coastal areas BARELY have accents if they have any at all. They sound more like Midwesterners than like their southern brethren.


Incidentally, don't visit Southerners and ask who are the most or best Southerners. It's like asking New Yorkers and Chicagoans who makes the best pizza, or Texans and North Carolinians who makes the best BBQ. You'll start a war. :)

Hellooooo, Memphis makes the best BBQ!

Speaking of Memphis, it still pisses some of us off that Memphis was put in Tennessee when the Louisiana purchase was divvied up... Memphis belongs to Mississippi's culture, dammit!

*Excluding Cajuns, but contrary to popular belief, not all New Orleanians are Cajuns.

Danalynn
12-23-2008, 09:39 AM
I was reading through the responses again, and to answer a couple questions, I meant "white southern". http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif

And as far as what I meant by "customs", this pretty much sums it up:


Southern culture is very polite, proud, religious, stratified, hard-drinking, tea-totaling, hierarcical, violent, rural (even in a lot of cities), and proud of it.


Thanks again, everyone, for all the great help!

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon10.gif

alleycat
12-23-2008, 09:41 AM
Add "football crazy" to your list.

Ganymede
12-25-2008, 07:33 AM
ITA. And for that matter, a lot of shows and movies drastically fail when they are set in New Orleans* or Jackson or Atlanta whathaveyou and the characters have these deep, ridiculously twangy or drawl-y southern accents. Southerners that grow up in urban and coastal areas BARELY have accents if they have any at all. They sound more like Midwesterners than like their southern brethren.

True, though it'll depend. Coastal accents in North America ranging from Georgia and South Carolina all the way to parts of Canada share many traits from the British settlers -- though most southern accents do, to some extent. The word "about" in Canada, for example, can sound quite similar in pronunciation in parts of the Outer Banks of NC. Ample preservation of the Queen's English can be found in pockets of the Appalachian mountains. There are certain vocabulary words and pronunciations that have (until recently) been insulated from outside influences, and thus have maintained traces of the same English used around the time of Shakespeare.

"smidgen" (a small quantity of something, often mentioned in reference to cooking),
"yonder" (something in the distance usually within sight, as in "his house is over yonder"),
and "reckon" (to count, estimate, consider, or suppose, as in, "I reckon we've got 10 more miles to go"),

are words that are frequently dismissed as ignorant southern USA hillbilly slang, but are all words heard in the UK today in standard speech.

The reason most of the people in movies sound terrible is they have the wrong cadence, and wrong pronunciation, particularly the wrong dipthongs. I suspect most of them have non-native vocal coaches, which is fatal. I have no scientific evidence to back this up, but empirically I have witnessed that British actors and actresses seem to bridge the transition more easily, which makes sense given the common heritage of their speech. Not always, but often.


Hellooooo, Memphis makes the best BBQ!


My dear sweet lady, the best BBQ is Eastern NC style in the vinegar sauce. A close 2nd is SC's mustard-based sauce, though Lexington style is acceptable. :D

alleycat
12-25-2008, 07:37 AM
My dear sweet lady, the best BBQ is Eastern NC style in the vinegar sauce. A close 2nd is SC's mustard-based sauce, though Lexington style is acceptable. :D
Don't start . . .

waylander
12-25-2008, 03:26 PM
There are certain vocabulary words and pronunciations that have (until recently) been insulated from outside influences, and thus have maintained traces of the same English used around the time of Shakespeare.

"smidgen" (a small quantity of something, often mentioned in reference to cooking),
"yonder" (something in the distance usually within sight, as in "his house is over yonder"),
and "reckon" (to count, estimate, consider, or suppose, as in, "I reckon we've got 10 more miles to go"),

are words that are frequently dismissed as ignorant southern USA hillbilly slang, but are all words heard in the UK today in standard speech.

'Tis true

Keyboard Hound
12-26-2008, 04:29 AM
I was born and raised in the hills of Appalachia. I'm here to say that southern superstition is alive and well, at least in these here hills and hollows where I come from. I've seen the effects of superstition on others, and I've lived with superstitions most of my life. Also alive is southern speak, southern charm and dang good vinegar-based barbecue sauce, as well as a lot of other good strong stuff. Y'awl pull you up a chair and rest a spell.

BudBoxer
12-26-2008, 06:26 AM
Quote:
"yonder" (something in the distance usually within sight, as in "his house is over yonder")

Interesting take on yonder. Most languages still have two words meaning "near-there" and "far-there." English once did in "there" and "yonder." The way I remember yonder being used by old-timers when I was a child in Central Georgia was yonder was the "far-there," just over the hill, couldn’t be seen, as in "the wild blue yonder." In stage productions of Romeo and Juliette, "beyond yond window breaks" made no sense to me with Romeo standing right there under the balcony. The balcony should be out of sight, just over the horizon.

Native Southerners often read and understand Shakespear’s meaning without the glossary. I know of at least seven Georgia accents among white natives (much overlap with African Americans, excluding urban Ebonics). A good spoken Georgia accent is Jimmy Carter’s. A good written Georgia accent is Flannery O’Connor’s. A good fake Southern accent is Vivian Leigh’s (British) in GWTW. (The dialect coach for GWTW was from Macon, GA.) A good way to write Southern is by setting the scene, not between the quote marks.

dalex
12-29-2008, 05:29 AM
Incidentally, don't visit Southerners and ask who are the most or best Southerners. It's like asking New Yorkers and Chicagoans who makes the best pizza, or Texans and North Carolinians who makes the best BBQ. You'll start a war. :)

Yes, we believe we are the most southern LOL


*Excluding Cajuns, but contrary to popular belief, not all New Orleanians are Cajuns.

That is so true. I happen to be a true Cajun (can trace my ancestors back to Nova Scotia and beyond) but have no Cajun accent. I have actually been told I speak like a New Yorker, only slower. This said by a native New Yorker; go figure.

Chase
12-29-2008, 06:30 AM
BBQ? You can't even mention BBQ within the same state and not expect a fight because each region is different.

Ditto chili in Texas and Oklahoma from what I hear.

Yup, the same for every nuance of hunting, bagging, caring for, and cooking the venison of pronghorns, deer, elk, and moose of Montana.

The only agreement is in making fun of folks who think red meat is natural, and it grows in Styrofoam flats wrapped in cellophane.

alleycat
12-29-2008, 06:36 AM
Yup, the same for every nuance of hunting, bagging, caring for, and cooking the venison of pronghorns, deer, elk, and moose of Montana.

The only agreement is in making fun of folks who think red meat is natural, and it grows in Styrofoam flats wrapped in cellophane.
Funny, I was talking to a friend just last week. I grew up in the country and when I got older I worked on neighboring farms starting at about age 12 (bought my first car with cash with the money I made). Anyway, I mentioned some of the things I did when I worked on farms. She was going, "Yuck, yuck, yuck!" It's probably better that some folks don't know where their food comes from.

Don
12-29-2008, 06:40 AM
Funny, I was talking to a friend just last week. I grew up in the country and when I got older I worked on neighboring farms starting at about age 12 (bought my first car with cash with the money I made). Anyway, I mentioned some of the things I did when I worked on farms. She was going, "Yuck, yuck, yuck!" It's probably better that some folks don't know where their food comes from.
I think there'd be a lot more appreciation of their rural brothers if everybody who lives in the city had spent a week on a farm at some time in their lives. :)

Izunya
12-30-2008, 04:00 AM
Southern culture is very polite

Northerners should remember that it's entirely possible to be polite and fairly insulting at the same time. Specifically (this may be strictly a Southern female thing) you aren't being rude if you put "bless his/her heart" into the sentence. "She never was the brains of the family, bless her heart," translates to, "She's an idiot."


religious . . . hard-drinking, tea-totaling

I think I should just re-affirm that yes, those last two are simultaneously true. You see, Baptists aren't supposed to drink, and a lot of (especially rural) Southerners are Southern Baptist. But at the same time, they like to drink, so there's a fair amount of hypocrisy on the subject. There's an old Southern joke that asks, "Why do you always take two Baptists when you go fishing?" and the answer is, "If you bring just one, he'll drink all the beer."


rural (even in a lot of cities)

And part of that rural-ness (yes, I know that isn't a word) is, depending on how you look at it, an interest in you as an individual or a tendency toward nosiness. I have a part-time job where I substitute for another guy, a man who goes around to the local courts and picks up legal cases. Every single time, everyone asks how Bill is and what's going on. The security guards at Federal, the perm-haired old ladies at Chancery. Everyone.

Depending on your personality, this is either a nice bit of human contact or a huge bright sparkling invitation to go utterly insane. I kind of like it, but I realize mileages vary.

Izunya