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AMCrenshaw
12-16-2008, 08:26 AM
title suffices

Rolling Thunder
12-16-2008, 08:34 AM
Notions. See, when a daddy notion and a mommy notion decide to come together and have an idea...

AMCrenshaw
12-16-2008, 10:59 AM
:) haha. But where do they (mommy & daddy) come from?

JJ Cooper
12-16-2008, 11:09 AM
Where do ideas come from?

Memory and imagination.

JJ

Mythical Tiger
12-16-2008, 11:29 AM
Hmmmm...... Now that I think about it.... My idea's come from my weird imagination. Maybe I take too many walks in the woods, and get whacked in the head by branch's to much:tongue. Who knows? Intresting that I happened to figure out how I turned stupid -.- :ROFL:

Nivarion
12-16-2008, 07:20 PM
ideas form as a reaction to factors outside ourselves. they are a reflection of what we see. they are responses to hardships and other beings.

like, if you are dealing with stairways a lot, before the elevator, and you are being worn out by it, then your mind will begin to work out a way to go around the stairs.

im not being very clear in my ideas here...

and ADHD moment, if ideas come from what we see around us, where do abstract ideas come from?

sunandshadow
12-17-2008, 01:20 AM
The mind's basic state is having an idea. It's actually much harder to have no ideas. We just don't notice most of our ideas because they are stupid or things we have thought of many times before. The mind stores ideas as memory. The mind gets bored easily and wants to change ideas frequently - this change can happen in response to external factors, remembering an internal idea, and whatever dreaming is.

Cyia
12-17-2008, 05:09 PM
Think of the brain as a computer storing everything you see, hear, smell, etc from the day you're born. Now randomly assemble 5 of those things into a question starting with "What if..." . Bam! Abstract idea.

robeiae
12-18-2008, 02:23 AM
Ideas come from the ether, from the mind participating in various eternal Forms.

scarletpeaches
12-18-2008, 02:25 AM
What Robovowels calls the ether, I'd call the subconscious.

Personal experiences get filed away in my memory, sometimes pop up in dreams, stew for a while in my subconscious and often present themselves when I'm thinking about a particular WIP/group of characters.

scope
12-18-2008, 03:03 AM
As already stated, in one way or the other ideas come from our minds. Accordingly, since the mind and body are always exchanging invisible messages, in one way or the other ideas emanate from our five senses. And the more we are aware of what we have and do see, hear, smell, touch, and taste, the more ideas we will have.

smoothseas
12-18-2008, 03:05 AM
Think of the brain as a computer storing everything you see, hear, smell, etc from the day you're born. Now randomly assemble 5 of those things into a question starting with "What if..." . Bam! Abstract idea.


just think - if all that data we’ve stored since birth was available for immediate recall, you'd probably fry your mother board in half a nanosecond.

*course there's always those things that we'd prefer to keep locked in a lower drawer in our mental filing cabinets.

Jerry B. Flory
12-18-2008, 09:00 PM
I like to think of it as this humongous neverending sewer. Some routes are made of concrete and the sludge oozes through it in deep channels and require a snorkel to dive deep and dredge some of the oldest and most stubborn of bacteria-laden fecal matter and lost corpses loose from the dark slippery bottoms so it drifts to the top and finally breaks the syrupy surface with a constipated blurp
Other times, however, you get stuck in narrow pipes and have to crawl through on your hands and knees or squirm like a half-fish half-man thing, scraping the slick metal for purchase. And, yet, other times it seems so shallow and green with algae that you can kick it loose with your muddy shoes and pick slices of it up in your hands and raise it to your nose for a vivid whiff.
It all depends which end of the sewer you wish to begin exploring, or in what puddle of runny shit you woke up in.

AMCrenshaw
12-18-2008, 11:20 PM
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/idea

To keep em coming; these responses are great.

katiemac
12-21-2008, 10:45 AM
"Who knows where thoughts come from? They just appear."

/end random movie quoting

Ruv Draba
12-22-2008, 01:20 AM
Ideas are seeded by necessity and idle curiosity. They are nurtured in a mulch of knowledge and myth. They grow in the light of rigour, nourished by occasional showers of perversity.

Haggis
12-22-2008, 01:25 AM
I steal mine from Rolling Thunder.

Ken
12-22-2008, 01:38 AM
...ideas don't exist.
If they did, we wouldn't.

truelyana
12-26-2008, 02:58 AM
Ideas can come either from as Scarlett has already mentioned your subconscious or other people's subconscious for various reasons. A web of information is in movement all around us, and a simple idea can be easily grabbed at any time. Ideas are a web of many things, as they are part of thoughts which keeps the active brain stimulated. If I get thoughts or ideas, I detach myself away from them, figure out their root and let them go, as I know they are either not mine or just part of an engraved experience I once had, which is no longer active in my current moment, so there is no need for it to be here.

Corpus Thomisticum
12-27-2008, 12:40 AM
Ideas are born of our very robust creative impulse, an ability to transcend merely being able to describe the world we see but as well to prescribe it, to understand it and analyze it, and ultimately make something different out of what originally existed. This ability itself is a product of our behavioral evolution as extremely social creatures, almost entirely dependent on our society and its continued ability to provide for our needs. We used to believe that we were the only animals with this ability but studies increasingly show that most mammals and other fauna we used to consider "dumb" -- some reptiles, fish, etc. -- have considerable reasoning capabilities, including this creative impulse. None, however, have it to the degree we do, and this likely derives from the reality that from a physical standpoint, when compared to almost any other animal, we suck. Physically, we only have a couple biological advantages (e.g., sweat glands, opposable thumbs, etc.), but just about any other animal on the planet can out-run us (on a sprint), out-swim us, and they all come with nifty teeth, claws, shells or poisons that make subduing them for lunch very difficult even when we can catch them. Our sole advantage -- though it's turned out to be a boon -- has been our ability to think, and not just observe.

Summary: Ideas come from brains that have been trained through 2 million years of evolution to see the world differently from other animals -- for sheer survival -- and most importantly, to take static concepts and combine their in unique ways to make something altogether new. One side effect of this evolutionary creative impulse is a powerful drive for modern people to express themselves by writing books, which we hope to the gods someone somewhere will want to read....

truelyana
12-27-2008, 04:06 PM
Ideas are born of our very robust creative impulse, an ability to transcend merely being able to describe the world we see but as well to prescribe it, to understand it and analyze it, and ultimately make something different out of what originally existed. This ability itself is a product of our behavioral evolution as extremely social creatures, almost entirely dependent on our society and its continued ability to provide for our needs. We used to believe that we were the only animals with this ability but studies increasingly show that most mammals and other fauna we used to consider "dumb" -- some reptiles, fish, etc. -- have considerable reasoning capabilities, including this creative impulse. None, however, have it to the degree we do, and this likely derives from the reality that from a physical standpoint, when compared to almost any other animal, we suck. Physically, we only have a couple biological advantages (e.g., sweat glands, opposable thumbs, etc.), but just about any other animal on the planet can out-run us (on a sprint), out-swim us, and they all come with nifty teeth, claws, shells or poisons that make subduing them for lunch very difficult even when we can catch them. Our sole advantage -- though it's turned out to be a boon -- has been our ability to think, and not just observe.

Summary: Ideas come from brains that have been trained through 2 million years of evolution to see the world differently from other animals -- for sheer survival -- and most importantly, to take static concepts and combine their in unique ways to make something altogether new. One side effect of this evolutionary creative impulse is a powerful drive for modern people to express themselves by writing books, which we hope to the gods someone somewhere will want to read....

Well expressed. :)

Komnena
12-29-2008, 05:32 AM
Ray Bradbury gets his from a crazy idea factory in Schenectady.

gorgias of leontini
01-06-2009, 05:35 AM
where do ideas come from?

Stop wasting your goddamn time.

ColoradoGuy
01-06-2009, 06:35 AM
Stop wasting your goddamn time.
Care to elaborate a bit?

C.bronco
01-06-2009, 06:39 AM
Stephen King was asked this once. He answered, "Utica."

My ideas are an amalgam of all of the stuff I've seen and that has been implanted in my brain (by normal causes, not aliens. That's another story. But it isn't mine. I don't know any aliens, personally, but I've seen them on TV.)

KTC
01-06-2009, 06:44 AM
Ideas come from the overbrain. It drops them into the lower brains as needed.

Corpus Thomisticum
01-06-2009, 07:28 AM
No, no, that's the intestines. Very similar, but still, slightly different. ;)

gorgias of leontini
01-06-2009, 09:48 AM
I try not to worry about the origins of things. If certain phenomena exists, it's more appropriate to see how it functions now-- that is, it is more appropriate (practical!) to investigate the consequences of its existence than to speculate about its origins. Otherwise we would be paralyzed.

ColoradoGuy
01-06-2009, 10:03 AM
I try not to worry about the origins of things. If certain phenomena exists, it's more appropriate to see how it functions now-- that is, it is more appropriate (practical!) to investigate the consequences of its existence than to speculate about its origins. Otherwise we would be paralyzed.
I disagree. I think it is both interesting and important for us to understand as best we can how our brains function. We do this all the time and yet we are not paralyzed.

gorgias of leontini
01-06-2009, 10:11 AM
I think it is both interesting and important for us to understand as best we can how our brains function.

OK. I respectfully disagree with your disagreement. :)

On the grounds that knowing the brain has little do with Where Ideas Come From, in reality. In real reality, where there are not unicorns as such, but horses and horns. What purpose could answering this question serve? I ask honestly.

Ideas are an emergent phenomenon, like consciousness itself. If we wish to play ring around the rosies, asking this question is pure gold. Otherwise, a perhaps more practical question is: We have ideas; what are the consequences of that fundamentally sound... fact?





(The paralysis I mention, by the way, is one of circuitous philosophy.)

Guffy
01-06-2009, 09:37 PM
My ideas are usually mistakes I try t fix.

AMCrenshaw
01-07-2009, 12:19 AM
Gorgy porgy. You mustn't have any curiosity. Graham Swift wrote, I think, that a human who isn't curious is dead.

I myself am in the realm of ideas being the necessary result of awareness. Experience + the brain's capacity to categorize complexly + observations that alter perception (i.e., alter category) + imagination (which discovers and broadens categories) = idea. ??

What confuses me still are the light bulb ideas. Do they come from this mind stuff I've described, but perhaps more suddenly?

AMC

semilargeintestine
01-25-2009, 04:07 AM
Plato strove to explain this very concept, among others, in his Theory of Forms.

Without getting too detailed, a Form is an abstract quality or property that transcends space and time. For example, if you take a basketball and think only of its roundness, you are observing the Form of Roundness. The Form is separate from the basketball, and all round objects participate or copy the Form of Roundness. You can likewise say this about the ball's color or size.

The world in which we live is basically a shadow of the world of Forms. A great way to explain this is to visualize a cave with a fire inside it. As people and objects move around the fire, their shadows are cast on the cave wall. Our world is the cave wall, with material objects being crude shadows of the Forms, which are what is truly real.

Because we all participate in these Forms, we are aware of all objects, whether or not we think of them consciously. This is why ancient civilizations were able to independently develop techniques for building homes and structures with fairly similar designs. If you look at a window built by multiple ancient civilizations that were isolated from each other, they all look pretty much the same. Another example is how regardless of style or design, all of us can recognize a chair or a table. Essentially, no idea is original or really ours. We simply participate in a higher, more perfect world of Forms.

Ruv Draba
01-25-2009, 02:24 PM
On the grounds that knowing the brain has little do with Where Ideas Come From, in reality.Knowing the brain isn't necessarily the object of knowing where ideas come from, or vice versa.

People are willing to pay handsomely to learn how to produce more ideas. Physician and author Edward De Bono for instance, has sold millions of books and games for just this purpose. Writing coaches such as Holly Lisle and Ken Rand sell writing e-books helping authors do the same thing. The mass entertainment and advertising industries are voracious consumers of fresh ideas. Many staff writers would sell their souls to have a fire-hydrant of fresh ideas outside their office (if their souls weren't already owned by Sony etc... ;)) In information and knowledge economies, many 'serious' businesses are now getting serious about nurturing new ideas too. For instance, consultancies such as 'Think, Play, Do' (http://www.thinkplaydo.com/)help businesses learn how to innovate.

While philosophical considerations don't always offer practical answers to practical questions, sometimes they do. For instance, my earlier answer included necessity, idle curiosity, knowledge, myth, rigour and perversity. All of these engender exercises you can do to generate ideas, or test or improve their quality.

Ken
01-25-2009, 03:40 PM
...Plato was brilliant.
If ever a diety walked the Earth it was he.

semilargeintestine
01-26-2009, 09:42 PM
Agreed.

AMCrenshaw
01-26-2009, 10:38 PM
...Plato was brilliant.
If ever a diety walked the Earth it was he.

He was just first. I'd sooner consider Shakespeare's works sacred than Plato's philosophy (is there much difference? can one be without the other?)

But back to the show:


Another example is how regardless of style or design, all of us can recognize a chair or a table. Essentially, no idea is original or really ours. We simply participate in a higher, more perfect world of Forms.


Assuming for a second that no god exists, is there ownership over ideas? Can we call Plato brilliant if his work isn't essentially original? The whole business of forms is fine, for example, but how do ideas about something kinda arbitrary (like morality) form?

AMC

semilargeintestine
01-26-2009, 11:01 PM
Assuming for a second that no god exists, is there ownership over ideas? Can we call Plato brilliant if his work isn't essentially original? The whole business of forms is fine, for example, but how do ideas about something kinda arbitrary (like morality) form?

AMC

Good question. Plato addresses the origin of abstract ideas, and it is pretty much what you'd expect. There is a form of Morality, a form of Good, a form of Evil, etc. The key concept though, is that the forms Plato is talking about exist entirely independent of human thought or understanding. In other words, when we come up with an "idea", our minds are simply recognizing and participating in a given form; however, in the absence of this recognition, the form still exists.

It's like playing peek-a-boo with a baby. The baby doesn't realize (not early on, anyway) that when you pull the blanket over your face, you're still back there. As far as he's concerned, you no longer exist. That's our mistaken belief about ideas according to Plato. We think that when we are not developing ideas, they don't exist when in reality, they are just behind the blanket.

I don't think Plato would have called his work original or brilliant. I think if he truly subscribed to his on theories, he would want people to realize that he was just participating in whatever form related to his "discovery". Most people who have come up with groundbreaking theories or ideas have been quick to point out that all they did was stumble upon something that already existed. I'm not arguing that Plato is correct, but most brilliant people seem to agree that whatever idea you are searching for is already out there--you just have to trip over it.

drcath
02-11-2009, 11:01 PM
where do ideas come from

My neuropsychology is rusty, so bear with me. The cortex is organised into areas that process different types of information: visual, auditory, tactile for example. There are areas around these that perform secondary processing: recognising letters, identifying pitch etc. There are then areas where these overlap - where processed information in various different forms comes together. This is where an idea comes from. It's a function of higher level processing.

If you asked me what an idea is, I would say it was a verbalised reaction to an internal state. Example: internal state is hunger. Idea is where's the fridge?

That's how it works for my cat, anyhow.

Newguy1428
06-08-2009, 08:20 AM
This guy is my favorite. Check out friends in Sydney (a "soiree") , 1991 PART 2

http://www.ugkrishnamurti.org/ug/ug_video/index.html

UG, who claims his initials stand for "useless guy" says that everything we know is based on arbitrary terms. Our parents tell us the sky is blue, then we learn from scientists that the sky is blue because of light reflecting off oxygen molecules in the atmosphere and so on. Skip to @ the 9:00 point for this part.

Also, what do I want? @ 5:30 if you want to know where ideas come from this guy may help you, even though he claims he cannot.

tarcanus
09-05-2009, 12:39 AM
I'm surprised that no one has stated that stimuli are what create ideas.

Sure, ideas come from memory and the combination of memory, imagination, etc., but where did all of this memory-information come from to begin with? Things you've seen or heard or smelled or experienced - external stimulus. Sure, eventually(the older you get the more material you have to work with) you start using only your memories and thoughts to come up with new ideas, but these are all building blocks on the foundation of when you experienced them.

Rufus Coppertop
10-19-2009, 04:16 AM
The nine daughters of Apollo bring them.