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Plot Device
12-09-2008, 04:43 AM
I simmered the turkey carcas for hours and got a great broth out of it. Then I strained it and put the broth into the fridge. (Meanwhile, I did NOT reduce it.)

Today I dumped the stock out into a huge pot so I can make a giant turkey stew out of it. However, when it came out of the plastic bowl, still chilly from the fridge, it was very rubbery and gelatinous (like something right out of a Jello gelatin TV ad).

Should it be THAT thick?

Should I add water to it?

joyce
12-09-2008, 04:50 AM
I believe this is normal but don't ask me why this happens. Fat....bone matter...I haven't a clue. I know this really isn't helpful, but I've seen the broth do this before.

Palmfrond
12-09-2008, 04:53 AM
Gelatin comes from cooking bones (the commercial kind might come from hooves and stuff too). It will melt into normal broth when you warm it up. You usually don't have to cook turkey carcasses that long. Two or three hours is plenty. Beef bones need to be simmered forever for good broth.

Plot Device
12-09-2008, 05:14 AM
Okay. I kinda wamnna juts go with the flow and take your word for it all. But I want to pose the question in a different way here:

Why is it that in my mind I keep thinking that when I remove a giant bowl of chilled soup from the fridge, the soup should be somewhat liquidy?

I have ALL that broth on the stove right now with all the leftover veggies and the meat from the turkey. And after it simmers for maybe half an hour, I intend to do a rapid cool-down, then bowl it all up into tupperware and freeze it. But (here's the important part) I will also leave one or two bowls in the fridge for eating tomorrow.

But ... will those two bowls that stay in the fridge overnight be all solidified as jello tomorrow and NOT be liquid-y when I take them out tomorrow for eating?

Am I wrong to believe that that's just ...... wrong???

Or have I been brainwashed by a lifetime of eating cans of Progresso soup?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-09-2008, 05:23 AM
You've been brainwashed. ;)

The 'rubbery' consistency shows how 'real' it is. That stuff in the can was scared once by a bird passing by outside - that's as close as it came to a turkey or a chicken.

And yes, it's liable to go a bit gelatinous when it's cooled down again... and don't let it sit in the refridgerator for longer than three, four days. It needs to be frozen or eaten by then.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-09-2008, 05:26 AM
And here's a good recipe for using it... substitute 'turkey' and 'turkey stock' for chicken and chicken broth.

Jenny's Chicken and Noodles


1 stewing chicken, boiled in water with celery, onion, garlic, salt and pepper, boned. Strain the chicken broth in which the chicken was cooked and set aside.



2 large onions, chopped

2 tbsp. parsley, snipped

1 tsp. dried thyme, crushed; or a handful of fresh thyme

1/2 tsp. pepper



1 pkg. (12 oz.) Reames® Home Style Egg Noodles (from your grocer's frozen food case)



Fresh mixed vegetables - whatever appeals. I use carrots, celery, mushrooms and frozen peas, pre-cooked.



2 cups milk

3 tbsp Corn Starch



Preparation: Sauté onion and celery until clear. Place diced chicken, chicken broth, onion, celery, parsley, thyme, pepper, in large Dutch oven. Bring to boil. Add noodles and other vegetables. Return to boil. Simmer covered for 20 to 25 minutes or until noodles are almost tender. Combine 1/2 cup milk and three tablespoons of corn starch, mix until smooth. Add to noodle mixture. Add remaining milk. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly.



Wonderful on a cold day with homemade bread and butter and a salad.

kikazaru
12-09-2008, 05:53 AM
If my stock doesn't go "rubbery" then it means I haven't done it right. I like soup with substance and when it goes gelatinous that means you've got every bit of flavour and goodness out of that carcass.

MaryMumsy
12-09-2008, 05:54 AM
You've been brainwashed. ;)

The 'rubbery' consistency shows how 'real' it is. That stuff in the can was scared once by a bird passing by outside - that's as close as it came to a turkey or a chicken.

And yes, it's liable to go a bit gelatinous when it's cooled down again... and don't let it sit in the refridgerator for longer than three, four days. It needs to be frozen or eaten by then.

QTF

Yes, the real stuff is 'jello-y'. That's what makes it taste so good.

MM

Plot Device
12-09-2008, 06:05 AM
Thanks everyone! :) (I guess I'm a better cook than I thought, eh?? ;) )

And I'll try that recipe some time!

GeorgeK
12-13-2008, 11:30 PM
If nothing else, remember that the bacteria that cause food-borne illness grow at the temperature of 40-140F. Therefore if you take your leftovers from the fridge and raise them to more than 140F, consistently, then you will kill off any bugs that might have otherwise tried to be a problem

HeronW
12-13-2008, 11:39 PM
Gelatin is a by product of boiling bones and connective tissue--cartilage, fascia, ligaments). This gelatin is part of what gives the elasticity so you can bend your elbows and knees, etc.

Here we toss a turkey neck into chicken soup to get that richer texture. I strain it to get out any bits of skin, bones broken off, etc. But that gel is the best part of the soup :}

Haggis
12-13-2008, 11:55 PM
Learn to love your gelatin, Plot, and it will love you. :D

Plot Device
12-14-2008, 01:36 AM
I had a bowl the other day. And I actually (no lie!) felt healthier all that day and into the next day than I have felt in a very long time. I had real and unwavering energy, and didn't need any coffee all day long.

Any my skin cleared up too.

I'm gonna make homemade soup (with the gelatin!) more often!

MaryMumsy
12-14-2008, 02:55 AM
And you don't need a turkey carcass. My grocery sells turkey parts year round. You can buy just the breast (expensive) or legs or thighs. Those are cheaper. You can accomplish the same thing using a whole chicken, or a cut up fryer.

MM

SarahDavidson
12-14-2008, 10:45 AM
Another good thing to do is brown the bones a little before you do the broth... do it in the oven to develop some richer flavor, then add to the soup pot with onions, carrots, celery, garlic, salt and pepper. Sweat the mirepoix (celery, onions, garlic and carrots) in a little bit of butter or oil on low heat until soft, then crank the heat and let them caramelize a bit (but not too far) before you add the turkey carcass and the water. That way you'll get a deeper flavor in the finished product. Add some fresh sage, rosemary and thyme for the last bit of cooking time, then strain it all into your storage container.

Ditto what Heron said about the why and the how of gelatin - it's perfectly natural, and adds a lot of flavor and texture to meat dishes.

Plot Device
12-17-2008, 03:48 AM
I am a firm believer in mire poix! :) So I defintiely added all of the above when I did my simmer thing (the garlic too!).

Meanwhile, I never heard of browning the bones or carmelizing the mire poix. That sounds so yummy! I am so totally going to do that next time!

sassandgroove
12-19-2008, 02:33 AM
interesting.

I would have been freaked out by a gelatinous gob, too. :)