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sacha_kimber
05-13-2005, 01:35 AM
I am looking for suggestions on what to include in a book about depression. My initial interests to write this book were based on personal experiences, however I have since researched this market and found it to be quite saturated. Not wanting to bow out on this topic (my heart still desires to write this book), I know this book will need to show a completely unique perspective with substantial information in order to impact this market.

So.... What would make you pick up a book about depression?

For more information about this book please visit my website at www.sachakimber.com (http://www.sachakimber.com/) and click on "depressed for a day".

Thank you so much for your help.

Tish Davidson
05-13-2005, 03:21 AM
I would be interested in suggestions on how to live with and help a depressed person rather than in self-help. I think it is hard (and frustrating) for the non-depressed to truly grasp what a depressed person is experiencing. I'd be interested in how living with a depressed parent affects kids and how having a depressed child affects family dynamics.

sacha_kimber
05-14-2005, 12:10 AM
I think it is hard (and frustrating) for the non-depressed to truly grasp what a depressed person is experiencing.


This is exactly how I feel! I wanted my book to address this issue in some way. I haven't been sure how to do this.

I know that there are books out there that tell the story about children growing up with depressed parents, but I hope to be the mom who's child never realizes her mother had depression until she is in high school or beyond. I'd like to include a section about pareting in general when a person suffers from depression.

As far as how "a depressed child affects family dynamics", I would like to include information or suggestions from my family as to how they dealt with my depression and how it affected them.

Thank you so much for your suggestions.

smallthunder
05-15-2005, 11:17 PM
I would be interested in suggestions on how to live with and help a depressed person rather than in self-help. I think it is hard (and frustrating) for the non-depressed to truly grasp what a depressed person is experiencing. I'd be interested in how living with a depressed parent affects kids and how having a depressed child affects family dynamics.

I was just in Barnes & Nobles (near Orlando, FL), looking for something in the psychology section ... and was absolutely AMAZED by the number of books for sale on depression. I take anti-depressants and have been through a few hospitalizations for this mental illness, so I have a small library of books on the topic already. I saw some of the books I already own, but then SO MANY others, too.

I was particularly pleased to see one book focusing on how to help someone you love who has depression (in general) ... and another book on dealing with & helping a depressed child (or teenager?), if I remember correctly.

I'm not trying to discourage anyone from pursuing these topics, mind you -- I think more should be written. But these topics haven't been left untouched.

What I haven't seen -- and could use -- is a book on how an adult child can help/deal with a depressed parent.

With the US population growing older, in general -- I think helpful books on geriatric issues, such as senior depression, will become increasingly in demand.

Just my two cents worth ...

sacha_kimber
05-16-2005, 11:19 PM
I was just in Barnes & Nobles (near Orlando, FL), looking for something in the psychology section ... and was absolutely AMAZED by the number of books for sale on depression.

I saw some of the books I already own, but then SO MANY others, too.




I am glad that you posted, but I must say that this is pretty disheartening. I knew there were a lot of books out, but if I am able to publish this book, which I AM writing I wonder how it will fair in the market. I'm thinking that the competition may be to tough for me to even get it out there.



I'm not trying to discourage anyone from pursuing these topics, mind you -- I think more should be written. But these topics haven't been left untouched.



I know that you did not mean to discourage, but unfortunately, I'm just interested in writing about a subject that has been the interest of many others. I do believe that if I were able to write about something unique that would peak the interest of readers I could be successful in writing on this subject.

Your idea about writing about the geriatric community was good, I'm just not sure I am the right one for that... at least not right now. Give it a couple of years and that may change. But by then someone might have alread written about this.

Oh well, I guess I'll just keep writing and maybe something big will break.
Thank you for your suggestions

smallthunder
05-17-2005, 07:22 PM
I am glad that you posted, but I must say that this is pretty disheartening. I knew there were a lot of books out, but if I am able to publish this book, which I AM writing I wonder how it will fair in the market. I'm thinking that the competition may be to tough for me to even get it out there.

I know that you did not mean to discourage, but unfortunately, I'm just interested in writing about a subject that has been the interest of many others. I do believe that if I were able to write about something unique that would peak the interest of readers I could be successful in writing on this subject.



Oh, noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!
ARGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!:Smack:

Do not, repeat, DO NOT be discouraged by what I wrote!
Perhaps I should have been more specific about the book titles I found at B&N. There were several books on how to "beat" depression using various methods, a couple of books taking a literary approach with first-person narratives, but only ONE there on helping someone you love who is depressed (and maybe one on helping children/teenagers with depression, but I'm not 100% sure about this).

So, the type of book you want to write was very UNDER-REPRESENTED on those B&N bookshelves.

Write!

sacha_kimber
05-17-2005, 11:58 PM
Smallthunder:
I have not been to B&N and looked on their shelves, I have just searched online and know there is alot written already. I cannot find anything exactly like what I am working on, but since this topic has so much already written I think it could make it difficult to publish. Anyhow, I was just hoping that I could find out what would make people pick up a book about depression and read it. What peaks your intersts?
I do appreciate your niceties, and I did not throw out my notes. In fact it motivated me to really try to present a pov that has not previously been presented.
Cordially,

Gehanna
05-18-2005, 08:53 PM
Seeing as I lack enough time to write anymore, I have a suggestion. How about research and writing on depression from the angle of why depression, despite abundance of available information, continues to prevail.

sacha_kimber
05-18-2005, 11:03 PM
How about research and writing on depression from the angle of why depression,

I'm sure this is a fabulous idea, but I'm not sure I understand what you are proposing. Could you give me a little description?

Thank you,

sassandgroove
05-19-2005, 01:24 AM
I know that I have been depressed since about age 11. I go to therapists and they help with situations, but never with the underlying depresssion. It is just there. I have good periods and bad periods. The book that helped me was "Seven Weeks To Sobriety" by Joan Mathews Larson. I think she has a book out now specifically about Depresssion. I am telling you this because while I found the book helpful, I didn't find it readable. It was frustrating to wade through and I had to extrapolate what I needed from it because I am not struggling with alcoholism. I picked it up after listening to a radio talkshow about food allergies, and they suggested the book, and said to replace alcohol with what you think you are allergic to. BUt it was not as simple as all that. I had it for over a year before doing anything with it because when you are depressed, you don't feel like doing anything, especially wading through an unreadable book. I will say that since I did, and I have been using the supplement she suggested since 2001, I have had little problems with depression. I ran out of the supplement once and for a week felt lost and sad and cried uncontollably until I remembered and went and bought it again. Joan's point is that not all depression is external that can be treated with therapy. She has found that a body that is lacking in certain nutritions or is allergic to something can be depressed or angry or what have you without external causes. I have also found that since I started taking the supplements, that my therapy has been much more useful. I have also heard of studies that show that depression can start with an external event, but become chemical later. I believe that is what happened to me. I am by nature an optimist and outgoing. I had some trama at ages 10 and 11 and became depressed. The idea that my later bouts of depression could be chemical fit, because of my nature. I am rambling, sorry. My point is maybe you could write something that while it is helpful and informative, is also inviting to read, so it doesn't feel like work for someone who doesn't want to do anything but lay on the couch and cry.

vtwordweaver
05-19-2005, 04:05 AM
How about hidden depression? My mother, who is 65, is very ill and will probably die withing a year or two. No one knows exactly what is wrong with her. I spent two weeks with my parents in January and it was very obvious to me that my mother is depressed and probably has been for most of her life. My mother can barely talk now, so she can't tell anyone what she is feeling.

Or maybe situational depression that doesn't go away when the situation goes away. Or unexpected benefits from depression meds (I take Wellburtrin and have not had a migraine since I have been on it. I don't feel I need it for depression any longer, but take it to keep the migraines at bay).

A book geared for teens that teens will actually read including a section of cutting.

smallthunder
05-19-2005, 09:36 PM
A book geared for teens that teens will actually read including a section of cutting.

I think a book specifically on teenagers and depression -- or even focused on female teenagers and depression -- would be of great interest to MANY parents trying to figure out how to help their once cheerful little girl -- without being sure she is just "going through a phase" or is depressed.

I mention focusing on females only because there are many aspects of teenage agnst that usually get expressed in gender-specific ways -- not exclusively, of course, since boys do develop eating disorders and cut themselves.

The book should be written for the girls, though, not their parents. First-hand stories of how successful women struggled with depression as teens would add to the appeal, since teenagers tend to think in terms of "Never" (get better) and "Always" (feel this bad). Plus a section on how to help a friend you think is depressed, since a girlfriend's opinion/help tends to carry more weight than a parent's for teenagers.

Sorry -- I just meant to propose a topic, not write the outline!

sacha_kimber
05-20-2005, 12:10 AM
My point is maybe you could write something that while it is helpful and informative, is also inviting to read, so it doesn't feel like work for someone who doesn't want to do anything but lay on the couch and cry.

Thank you so much for all the stuff you shared. All of it is so helpful. This is the first time I have ever really looked at my depression or really talked about it with others. I feel like I am putting myself out there and I am not sure that what I have to say is all that important. I plan to look up Joan's book and see if she wrote another book specifically geared towards depression like you mentioned. I am a recovering alcoholic 9+years, and I planned to mention (might even have a whole chapter dedicated to this) my sobriety and how it has tremendously impacted my recovery from depression. I still have frequent bouts of depression so I know that I am not completely free. Since I am not a psychologist or any type of PhD, my book will be easy to read and hopefully enjoyable. At least that would be my goal.

sacha_kimber
05-20-2005, 12:23 AM
weaver and smallthunder:
I really like the idea of a book focused toward the teen population, I hadn't thought about that and maybe that is where my story might be beneficial. I really struggled the most through my teen years and I encountered many difficult situations that probably arose out of my depression. It is so true that when I was a teen I believed that things would "always" be this way and that I would "never" get better, and that is not the truth. But being young is sort of a blinder. I would really have to put something out there that would really attract the teen population and since I had not thought about this previously, I will have to conduct some additonal research. Any other suggestions on writing for teen girl would great.

Just in case you're curious, I have an outline on my website of the proposed manuscript, plus or minus several changes that have occurred over the past 24 hours. Go to www.sachkimber.com (http://www.sachkimber.com/) and click on the "Depressed for a Day" link.

sacha_kimber
05-20-2005, 02:14 AM
Hey you guys:
I've finally got it!! The book focused on depression written for teenage girls - Thats it!! I searched on amazon.com and there were only 30!! books on depression for teens and several of them were from the psychological perspective and several more were written for the parents. So its settled my book WILL be for adolescent girls.

Yeah!!! I am so excited that I actually have an idea that hasn't been done (at least not recently)!!!

smallthunder
05-22-2005, 05:34 PM
Great to hear your enthusiasm!
Keep us posted how the book goes -- and best of luck!
:Clap: