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View Full Version : Best Thing You Ever Cooked? (Mine was a gumbo)



shawkins
12-01-2008, 04:47 AM
Most years I take an afternoon on the weekend after Thanksgiving to cook something that isn't a turkey. This year I made seafood/sausage gumbo, and I flat-out nailed it. I actually do think it was the best thing I ever cooked, and probably in the top 10 things I ever ate. My girlfriend, who hates spicy food, ate three bowls. My brother, who has bad fish allergies, phoned 911, stuck himself with an epi pen, and managed two bowls before the ambulance arrived.

The downside is that the preparation is non-trivial. I've made this recipe before without homemade fish stock and it was good but nothing special. This year I happened to have some fish stock in the freezer that I'd nearly forgotten about and it made a huge difference. I've typed up both the "WOW!" and "Good but nowhere near what it could be" variations of the recipe below.

Hope you like it!

Seafood Stock
You know how all the snooty cookbooks go on and on about how making your own stock really is the only way to go? They finally wore me down and I decided to try it. It actually does make a huge difference.

Starting about January of last year, I started saving the peelings from all the shrimp I bought (they're cheap here; YMMV) and other miscellaneous fish goo. Every time I got any shrimp shells, lobster carcasses, or fish bones, I put them in a plastic bag and stuck the bag in the freezer. By about mid-June, the freezer was overflowing. I'm guessing I had the shells of 10-15 pounds of shrimp, the shells and innards of a couple lobsters, and a few miscellaneous fish skeletons.

Heat about 2 tbsp oil in a stock pot. Add in:

2 small onions, dices
2 small carrots, diced
4 celery stalks, dicedCook until softened. Add in:

All your shrimp shells & lobster shells. (mine filled a large stock pot)
2 bay leaves
some white wine
black pepperAlso, when rooting around, I discovered a couple of shrink-wrapped tilapia that were too freezer burned to cook, so I threw them in too:

A couple of freezer burned tilapia.Fill to the top with cold water. Bring almost to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for a good long while (45 minutes-ish?). Strain. Pour liquid into a clean pot and refrigerate or freeze until ready for use.

I ended up with about 3 gallons of stock that was the color of brown lake water and smelled like fish, but not in a good way. It did not appear promising. I stuck it in the freezer and forgot about it until I went digging for frozen peas last week.


A Poor Substitute for the Above Stock Recipe That Has The Advantage Of Being Something You Didn't Have To Start Work On Six Months Ago
The gumbo recipe calls for 3 pounds of shrimp. Shell them. Heat about 1 tbsp oil in a stock pot. Add in:

a quartered onion
1 finely chopped carrot.Cook for a minute or two

Add the shrimp shells. Cook for about a minute.Add about 2 quarts water. Bring to a soft boil, cover, and cook for 20 minutes.

Strain out the shells, onion, and carrots. Add in:

24 oz. bottled clam juice
The Actual Gumbo Recipe

1. Make a roux.

Heat about 1/2 cup vegetable oil in a frying pan. Gradually add in about 1-1.5 cups flour, a tablespoon at a time. Stir constantly.

The roux is done when it is about the consistency of peanut butter. Traditionally, it should also be about the color of peanut butter, but mine always ends up about the color of Hershey's chocolate. Possibly I'm doing something wrong, but the end result (the gumbo) is good.

This takes about 20 minutes and is extremely boring as the stirring must be more or less constant. If a well-meaning s.o. or housemate pops in and asks "is there anything I can do to help?" enlist them to stir the roux even if they were just being polite. They will forgive you when they taste the gumbo.

When the roux is done, take it off the heat and continue to stir until it cools down a bit.

2. Chop ingredients.

4 big yellow onions, finely chopped
4 stalks celery, chopped
2 big jalapeno peppers. (The jalapeno seeds contribute significantly to the spiciness. I usually only use the seeds of a single pepper.)
2 green peppers, seededMelt 5 tablespoons butter in a large stock pot. Add onions, peppers and celery. Cook until softened, about 6-8 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3. More Chopping

Slice 1.5 pounds andouille sausage, ideally fresh from an actual butcher shop/meat counter, not that shrink wrapped crap. Add to the veggies, together with:

4 biggish cloves garlic, smashed and chopped. (NOT run through a garlic press)
4 cups okra, sliced about 1/2" thickCook until the okra stops making those white thread thingies, about 5 minutes

4. The Worst Is Over

Add in:

1/2 teaspoon thyme (dried actually seems to work better for some reason
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 cups diced tomatoes (canned is fine)
About 2-3 quarts fish stock.Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer for 20 minutes

5. Getting there

Whisk in the roux. The idea is to add color and substance, not turn the whole thing into sludge. Stop when the soup is a bit darker than tea but not as dark as Coca-Cola.

Simmer for another 45 minutes.

6. Voila

Bring the soup back to a boil. Add in:

3 lbs. shrimp
4 cups crab meat
1 pint oysters + their juiceCook another 3-5 minutes, until the shrimp are pink and curled and the oyster edges have started to curl.

You can serve over rice or just eat as a soup.


What's the best thing you ever cooked?

Fraulein
12-01-2008, 11:31 PM
I grew up in Cajun Louisiana, and honestly, I would never consider using tomatoes in a gumbo. I think what you made was more like a stew or what most would call a Creole gumbo.

The best gumbo, in my opinion, has a thin base with chunks of seafood or chicken/sausage, and it's poured over white rice. (I don't eat it anymore though.) I liked extra rice, sort of like rice and gravy, which was sometimes frowned upon. :tongue

As a Cajun native, I was shocked whenever I tried gumbo in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, because they put okra in it- bleck. I stopped eating it way before I became a vegetarian, because it was just too disappointing. :cry:

This guy has a good write up about "Cajun" gumbo. Note the fourth paragraph. ;) Here's a picture from his website:

http://stuffcajunpeoplelike.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/sea-food-gumbo-020.jpg?w=252&h=190
(website: http://stuffcajunpeoplelike.wordpress.com/2008/03/31/10-gumbo/)



If you'll excuse all of the cultural trash-talking...
In the most traditional sense, gumbo is a mixture of whatever the family wants it to be, i.e. whatever you feel like adding to the pot. So, I'm happy to hear that your gumbo turned out to be extra yummy. :)

Elwolf
12-01-2008, 11:34 PM
I would think that the best thing that I have ever cooked would have to be chicken with cumin, curry, salt, pepper, and butter. Sure, it's pretty simple, but you have to get the spices just right or it tastes bad!

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-01-2008, 11:39 PM
Oooo, baby... Prime Rib. :) I outdid myself.

Fraulein
12-01-2008, 11:53 PM
Sorry... I didn't answer your question. The best thing that I have ever made was a white chocolate cheesecake that was topped with halved, white chocolate covered strawberries.

TerzaRima
12-02-2008, 12:15 AM
The most compliments I have ever received were for very simple things--smashed potatoes made with buttermilk, chives and roasted garlic, for example.

smoothseas
12-02-2008, 12:46 AM
This is right up there with the rest of my best and my diner guests are always raving about it. I’m making it tonight, so the recipe is right here and handy.





Chicken Marsala


Ingredients

8 chicken cutlets
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 to 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 to 4 tablespoons olive oil
1 large shallot, finely chopped
2 to 3 garlic cloves, smashed
2 ounces portabella mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup sweet Marsala
3/4 cup low-salt chicken broth


Directions

Sprinkle the chicken with salt and pepper. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of oil in a heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 4 of the cutlets and cook until golden brown, about a minute or two per side. Remove chicken to a plate. Add another tablespoon and olive, if needed. Sauté the remaining chicken.


Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the skillet. Add the shallot and garlic. Sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add a tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and sauté until tender and the juices evaporate, roughly 3 minutes. Season with kosher salt. Add the Marsala. Simmer until the Marsala reduces by half, about 2 minutes. Add the broth. Simmer until reduced by half, about 4 minutes. Return the chicken to the skillet. Pour in all of the pan juices. Cook just until heated through, turning to coat, about 1 minute. Stir the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter into the sauce. Then season the sauce with salt and pepper, to taste.

Serve with pasta or over rice. I usually make spaghetti with olive oil and garlic and serve with a nice, crusty baguette.


*To economize, I buy rib-in chicken breasts when on sale. Put the breasts in the freezer until partially frozen. I then skin them, and carefully slice the breast horizontally, getting 2 to 3 pieces per breast. With a meat mallet, pound flat between two pieces of was paper or plastic wrap.

Frugal cook that I am, I then take the breast bone (still has lots of meat on it) and poach. When cool, I shred and use it to make chicken salad, filling for burritos, or add to soup.

bylinebree
12-02-2008, 01:01 AM
Chile. Mine has won three 1st places. It's mildly spicy and a little sweet, super easy, low fat and very delish!

Here's the basic ingredients:
Lean ground turkey
Canned no-salt tomatoes, diced or crushed
Canned black beans & kidney beans
Hunts BBQ sauce
Mild-to-medium picante sauce
Cumin
Chile powder
Dried minced onion
Ground pepper, dash salt

Even kids like this -not too spicy for them.

Julie Worth
12-02-2008, 01:12 AM
1. Make a roux.

Heat about 1/2 cup vegetable oil in a frying pan. Gradually add in about 1-1.5 cups flour, a tablespoon at a time. Stir constantly.



Much easier (and less toxic!) to brown the flour dry in an iron pot in the oven. One to three hours at 450 F, then add to the oil floating at the top of the gumbo. I tried Tony Chachere's Instant Roux Mix last time I was in Louisiana, and found it pretty good. It's available from simplycajun.com.

Julie Worth
12-02-2008, 01:15 AM
I grew up in Cajun Louisiana, and honestly, I would never consider using tomatoes in a gumbo. I think what you made was more like a stew or what most would call a Creole gumbo.

I always add a can of tomato paste. It seems to help smooth out the roux.


As a Cajun native, I was shocked whenever I tried gumbo in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, because they put okra in it- bleck.



Exactly! Even though the word gumbo is synonymous with okra, I despise the stuff.

selkn.asrai
12-02-2008, 01:51 AM
Every time people visit for dinner, they ask me to make my specialized recipe for chicken parm (secret's mostly in the sauce). The other is a Greek chicken pasta.

Cooking is the most fun I've had since I learned how to read.

SarahDavidson
12-02-2008, 02:06 AM
The best thing I've ever cooked was the first time my now-spouse ever came to my place for dinner, and I went all out. Everything was made from scratch. The app was stuffed artichokes, and the main dish was a spice rubbed ribeye steak with a garlic-herb compound butter. On the side was fetuccine with gorgonzola cream sauce, bruschetta finished with white truffle oil, and grilled zucchini spears. I made bellinis to drink, and finished with a homemade bellini ice cream. That was the exact point where we went from "casually dating" to "an item."

However.... the stuff I'm well known for (at least among our social circle) isn't nearly as fancy. I make awesome nachos (the secret is garlic butter) and above-average "bar food" type stuff, like egg rolls, hot wings, onion rings, stuffed mushrooms, etc. from scratch. Monday night football has migrated from the bar to our house because we have better bar food.

selkn.asrai
12-02-2008, 02:21 AM
Tonight, I'm cooking seared steak with baby bella mushrooms sauteed (insert necessary accents) in sherry, covered in a cabernet reduction and cheddar-filled rolls.

The steak took months to get right. Cast iron pan = essential. Thank God for great-grandmothers and the kitchenware they leave for the next generation (or three). :P

shawkins
12-02-2008, 02:22 AM
I grew up in Cajun Louisiana, and honestly, I would never consider using tomatoes in a gumbo. I think what you made was more like a stew or what most would call a Creole gumbo.

I probably should have put in some disclaimers before I hit submit. (I forgot gumbo recipes are a wellspring of jihad.) For the record, I'm only asserting that it was tasty by non-Louisiana standards. :)

I'm not generally crazy about okra, but I do like it in this. Not sure where the tomato idea came from, but I like them in most anything.


If you'll excuse all of the cultural trash-talking...

I will if you'll excuse my excess of self congratulation in the OP. I, um, may have had a couple beers with the gumbo.


Much easier (and less toxic!)

Seriously? Roux is toxic?

Julie Worth
12-02-2008, 02:29 AM
Seriously? Roux is toxic?

Try stirring a smoking mess of hot oil and flour on a stovetop!

Fraulein
12-02-2008, 05:54 AM
I probably should have put in some disclaimers before I hit submit. (I forgot gumbo recipes are a wellspring of jihad.) For the record, I'm only asserting that it was tasty by non-Louisiana standards. :)

I'm not generally crazy about okra, but I do like it in this. Not sure where the tomato idea came from, but I like them in most anything.People can be sensitive about cultural recipes. I'm sure they'd laugh at me if I told a bunch of New Yorkers what I thought about New York-style pizza.

Okra has a slimy texture. I like pickled, cocktail okra and small amounts of fried okra, but that's all.


I will if you'll excuse my excess of self congratulation in the OP. I, um, may have had a couple beers with the gumbo.:ROFL:


I tried Tony Chachere's Instant Roux Mix last time I was in Louisiana, and found it pretty good. It's available from simplycajun.com.There's a shaker of that in my kitchen cabinet. It's not mine though. My boyfriend keeps it around like he's going to use it. :rolleyes: Who knows???

Back in high school, I used to work as a cashier where they manufactured Tony Chachere's products. They had a cafe at the time, and it was a pretty decent summer job.

If the label of someone's Tony Chachere's product says Ryan St. on it, then I know exactly where that product came from.

The brothers who own the place are half Cajun and half Lebanese, an interesting combination.

bylinebree
12-02-2008, 11:30 PM
Roux made with oil?? :eek:

selkn: Your seared steak sounds great! I've grown up using a cast iron skillet, and it does many things well - ie, fajitas.

I learned to sear steaks when, in desperation (being raised in the West on steak & potatoes!) we only had a gas stove and no grill in the bungalow we rented - and only a gas stove. I tried broiling steaks on it and YUCK.

So I tried the skillet method, it was a real saver. Nice hear someone else uses it!

vixey
12-02-2008, 11:40 PM
Try stirring a smoking mess of hot oil and flour on a stovetop!

I always make a roux with butter and flour.

shawkins
12-03-2008, 12:04 AM
I'll defer to Fraulein on this, but I believe cajun roux is traditionally made with vegetable oil. Or possibly I'm being a philistine again.


The steak took months to get right. Cast iron pan = essential. Thank God for great-grandmothers and the kitchenware they leave for the next generation (or three). :P

Yes indeed. When my grandmother died, I drove through five states to get her cast iron skillet & biscuit pan.

vixey
12-03-2008, 12:07 AM
Yes indeed. When my grandmother died, I drove through five states to get her cast iron skillet & biscuit pan.

My mother has her grandmother's cast iron frying pan. It's a ten inch pan that's 4 inches deep with a long handle. It is truly the only thing (other than her jewelry) that I want from my mom when she's gone.

blacbird
12-03-2008, 12:38 AM
A pasta with Alfredo sauce containing sautéed wild morel mushrooms I picked myself that very morning.

caw

Shadow_Ferret
12-03-2008, 12:42 AM
Yes indeed. When my grandmother died, I drove through five states to get her cast iron skillet & biscuit pan.
I took my dad's cast iron skillets when he passed. He abused them. There's like a layer of blackened char on them that is just disgusting. I started scraping them, but it's a lot of work.

smoothseas
12-03-2008, 12:53 AM
Some tips on cleaning and reseasoning abused-cast iron cookware


http://antiques.about.com/cs/miscellaneous/ht/CleanCastiron.htm

Julie Worth
12-03-2008, 01:14 AM
I always make a roux with butter and flour.


Using butter, I doubt that you could get to the proper chocolate color for gumbo. Something very bad would happen first.

ABekah
12-03-2008, 08:23 AM
Mine would have to be a red velvet cheesecake. It is absolutely beautiful & delicious!

A second favorite is mushroom brie soup.

mario_c
12-03-2008, 08:59 AM
Good job, shawkins. Sounds yummy!

Every year around my birthday I make a lasagna. It's a pretty huge catastrophe that I try to turn into a coherent meal (that lasts over a week).
This year I used pizza dough - tried to stretch it wider than my sizable pan and then do a fold in a 's' style, but it turned out more pie-shaped. Maybe for New Year's I'll hit the Italian bakery for lasagna sheets and try again.
Bottom layer, veggies (eggplants, onions, peppers red and yellow, and lots of mushrooms). Fold over 's'.
Next layer, meat - lots and lots of sausage, ham and ground beef. And sauce. Fold over other 's'.
Top layer, cheese (mozzarella, and good ol' orange cheddar). And a layer of pepperoni and more sauce.

As good as it gets, folks.

Kitrianna
12-05-2008, 03:46 AM
The best thing I make on a regualr basis for dinner- my homemade mac and cheese.

My cookies get rave reviews all the time.

But the thing I'm most proud of was when a friend brought home a corned beef roast and asked me to make corned beef and cabbage. I had never had it before, but I somehow managed to make the dish so well that everyone loved it, especially and including those who had had it numerous times in their pasts. Now if only I could keep the breading from falling off my chicken fried steak I would be a happy woman :D

kikazaru
12-06-2008, 06:43 PM
Now if only I could keep the breading from falling off my chicken fried steak I would be a happy woman :D

I've never had chicken fried steak but I do this for breaded chicken. Before dipping your meat in your breading, lightly coat it in seasoned flour first. Let it sit in the fridge to set for a while. Then dip it in your liquid (I usually use a mix of beaten egg and seasonings) and then coat it in your crumbs. Let this set also in the fridge. If you are frying it, let your pan and oil get good and hot before you put the meat in it. Then turn only once - repeated turning causes the coating to crumble.

I generally don't "fry" I oven bake and this method works perfectly for beautiful crunchy chicken.

BenPanced
12-07-2008, 04:36 AM
In the hundreds of times I've made gravy, I've screwed it up only three times. The other times, it's come out perfect. I get the gene from my mother; her sister could only make meat-flavored library paste.

CatSlave
12-07-2008, 06:02 AM
To shawkins: THANK YOU. Lovely recipe.

Several comments about gumbo: my sister makes her annual Christmas Eve gumbo by baking the flour (no real roux), then cooking the seafood to death until it shrivels up into tiny, rubbery pieces. It totally sucks. And I can't convince her to improve her methods, so I shut up, nibble at a small bowl and wish I were home eating my own gumbo. But it being the season of peace and goodwill, I manage to endure.

There is NOTHING that can replace a slow-cook roux of oil and flour.
It smells divine, and well worth the risk of injury. Live dangerously, I say.
IMO, butter would burn long before the roux is cooked properly, unless you're just doing a five-minute breakdown of the flour and don't need the rich, complex flavor a long-cooking roux would provide.
All the recipes I've encountered advised pretty much a 50-50 ratio of oil to flour. Obviously what you did to yours works, so I'll have to reconsider.

Anyway, now I'm hungry and bummed out that yet another Christmas Eve will be highlighted by crappy gumbo.

Thanks again for the recipe. :)

Teleute
12-17-2008, 09:51 AM
I have recently studied the topic of gumbo extensively.


You know how all the snooty cookbooks go on and on about how making your own stock really is the only way to go? They finally wore me down and I decided to try it. It actually does make a huge difference.

It so does, for etouffe, too.


I ended up with about 3 gallons of stock that was the color of brown lake water and smelled like fish, but not in a good way. It did not appear promising.

Yeah, that's what it's supposed to look and smell like: pond.

You can do stock with the shells of just a couple of pounds of shrimp, too, or crabshells or crawfish shells or fish parts or any combination thereof. You don't need to save stuff for that long! I like to have a low country boil with shrimp or crawfish or both, make everyone save their shells, and then put them in the crockpot that night with all the rest of the ingredients. When you wake up, you have fish stock.


Heat about 1/2 cup vegetable oil in a frying pan. Gradually add in about 1-1.5 cups flour, a tablespoon at a time. Stir constantly.

The roux is done when it is about the consistency of peanut butter. Traditionally, it should also be about the color of peanut butter, but mine always ends up about the color of Hershey's chocolate. Possibly I'm doing something wrong, but the end result (the gumbo) is good.

For a peanut-butter colored roux, you need less flour or more oil. I think the proper ratio is 1 cup flour for every 3/4 cup of oil.

Dark brown roux is fine for gumbo, but if you ever want to make etouffe, you ought to change the ratio a bit.


This takes about 20 minutes and is extremely boring as the stirring must be more or less constant. If a well-meaning s.o. or housemate pops in and asks "is there anything I can do to help?" enlist them to stir the roux even if they were just being polite.

ROFL, I totally do this!


I'll defer to Fraulein on this, but I believe cajun roux is traditionally made with vegetable oil. Or possibly I'm being a philistine again.

It can be made with vegetable oil, (REAL) butter, or bacon grease.


I'm not generally crazy about okra, but I do like it in this. Not sure where the tomato idea came from, but I like them in most anything.

Generally, gumbo that has okra has tomatoes, and gumbo that has tomatoes has okra. And generally, tomato-okra gumbo (also called Creole gumbo) has seafood, and Cajun gumbo can have seafood but usually has sausage, chicken, and tasso. (I grew up across the river from Louisiana, in Mississippi, and I only had Creole gumbo, ever, until I went to family functions of actual French-speaking Cajuns in college. I kept thinking, where the hell is the okra?)

The difference between Cajun and Creole is that Cajun is the culture of the French descendants in that area, and Creole is a hybrid of Cajun and African--thus the okra, which is an African vegetable, in the gumbo. Creole food is more dominant around the (Mississippi) river, due to obvious ethnographic reasons, and Cajun food is more dominant the further you go west.

Sorry to sound like a know-it-all; I had to get to the bottom of this last year because I couldn't find any satisfactory gumbo recipes. I vastly prefer Creole gumbo, though I like the Cajun stuff, too. And I prefer etouffe to either kind of gumbo.

As to the thread question, the best dish that I cook is bananas foster chimichangas. It is probably also the least healthy food I have ever consumed--brown sugar, rum, butter, and bananas all wrapped in a tortilla, fried, and sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar.

shawkins
12-18-2008, 01:12 AM
As to the thread question, the best dish that I cook is bananas foster chimichangas. It is probably also the least healthy food I have ever consumed--brown sugar, rum, butter, and bananas all wrapped in a tortilla, fried, and sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar.

That sounds really good. Got a recipe?

LaurieD
12-18-2008, 01:53 AM
Best thing I've ever made... hands down my homemade mac and cheese. It's never the same twice but everybody in my house (even my kids in their pickiest phases) love it.

I make a standard white sauce and then toss in whatever cheeses I have on hand - swiss, munster, Velveeta, even sliced American cheese has made an appearance. I have no idea how much - I keep melting cheese in until it tastes cheesy and is the right consistency. I like to use odds and ends of pasta, half a cup of shells, a handful or two of elbows, a cup or so of twists, you get the idea.

After the pasta is cooked and placed in a buttered casserole dish, I stir the cheese sauce in, sometimes I add a few smallish chunks of Monterey jack or some cream cheese chunks and stir those in too. I usually dust the top with buttered bread crumbs, but the last time I made this, I was out of ready made bread crumbs and didn't feel like making my own, so I dusted the top with Parmesean. A friend of mine, excellent cook, but very by the recipe kind of girl, ate three bowls before claiming she was about to explode. (Bake for about 30 min on 350.)

Teleute
12-18-2008, 02:35 AM
That sounds really good. Got a recipe?

Sure, but don't eat it if you don't have health insurance, k? :)


Bananas Foster Chimichangas - serves 4

Ingredients:

Filling:
3 firm bananas, quartered (sliced once horizontally and once vertically)
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
2 teaspoons rum flavoring or 2 tablespoons dark rum (Cruzan black strap, Sailor Jerry, or the equivalent)

Chimichangas:
4 8- or 10-inch flour tortillas
Vegetable oil for frying
Cinnamon sugar (1/2 tsp cinnamon for every 1 tbsp white sugar)

Ice cream to serve, if desired

Directions:

1. Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Stir in brown sugar and bananas, and stir until brown sugar is dissolved. Pour in rum or rum flavoring, and cook another 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat. Spoon 1/4 the banana mixture into each tortilla, and fold up like a burrito, tucking in the ends.

2. In another skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, fry chimichangas until golden, about 1-2 minutes on each side. Drain on paper towels.

3. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Top with ice cream if desired.

cooeedownunder
12-18-2008, 01:10 PM
I know, I need to get another life, but PEACH MELBA :D

jennifer75
12-27-2008, 06:47 AM
The most compliments I have ever received were for very simple things--smashed potatoes made with buttermilk, chives and roasted garlic, for example.

It's the simpler things that wet my willie. ;)

Kalyke
12-27-2008, 07:35 AM
I've made some astonishing soups and stews. Lovely breads. I am not a fancy cook. Give me a crock pot and some beans and I will cook something good.

jennifer75
12-27-2008, 08:30 AM
My crockpot creation smells soooooooooooooooo good. I want to eat it NOW! It's only been about 3 hours.....c'monnnnnnn slow cooker!!!!

C.bronco
12-27-2008, 08:32 AM
It's hard to say. My guacamole and lemon chicken are pretty good, but I made stuffed mushrooms and baked brie recently that came out great.

My fave is the guac, however. I grew tomatoes and basil this summer, and made a lot of it!

blacbird
12-27-2008, 09:47 AM
The most compliments I have ever received were for very simple things

Everyone needs to post this on their refrigerator. One of the things that drives me nuts about the celeb chef shows is the expensive complexity that is supposed to equal good food. Everybody can make wonderful and nutritious meals out of the simplest ingredients and techniques.

I frequently sautee chopped veggies (any combination of bell peppers, leeks, onions, carrots, summer squashes, celery, broccoli, bok choi, swiss chard, kohlrabi, daikon radish, baby corn, bamboo shoots, water chestnuts, jerusalem artichokes, etc.) in a little olive oil and ground pepper and the wonderful condiment from the Goya company called Adobo powder. If you don't have Adobo, a squeeze of lemon juice works just fine. Everybody in my family eats it like candy; just don't overcook. A perfect and quick side-dish for any meal.

caw

jennifer75
12-28-2008, 12:30 AM
Everyone needs to post this on their refrigerator. One of the things that drives me nuts about the celeb chef shows is the expensive complexity that is supposed to equal good food. Everybody can make wonderful and nutritious meals out of the simplest ingredients and techniques.



I quote myself...


It's the simpler things that wet my willie. ;)

I sauteed red pepper, onion and mushroom and blended it in my eggs. Served it up with a package of frozen potatos o'reilly with cooked cut up hot dog pieces.

Deelish. And simple.

Claudia Gray
12-28-2008, 03:47 AM
It was definitely not the gumbo I made yesterday, which, while okay, came out a bit thin and could've used more sausage. Ah, well. Live and learn.

I make a nice lasagna, and I have gotten pretty good at a variety of soups. But I think the best thing I ever made was a Caribbean chicken chili. Come to think of it, I should make that again soon.

BookDragon
01-23-2009, 03:07 AM
One of the best things I ever cooked was a pork tenderloin. I cut the tenderloin in half, and then, cut the sides into flaps of a sort, and opened it completely up. Made a stuffing of baby spinich, wilted slightly, cream cheese, and sauteed mushrooms. Rubbed a cut bulb of garlic on the tenderloin, placed the stuffing inside, tied it up, and roasted it.. It was amazing.

maxmordon
01-23-2009, 03:14 AM
Toasts.