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Bravo
11-30-2008, 11:16 AM
TDK excluded, this is the best film i have seen this year, and one of the best films i've seen in many years.

it is in fact, as close to a masterpiece level of storytelling as one can get; everything is connected and tied together in a unique, highly compelling way.

i dont want to spoil too much of the film, because its one of those things where its best if you dont know the details but basically it's a story of a kid from the slums who somehow manages to get on india's "who wants to be a millionare" and starts winning.

the question is: how does he know the answers to all these questions? is he cheating? and from there, it just takes off hitting you, rewinding, fast forwarding, hitting you again. there's no songs or dances in this movie (well except for the closing credits which you have to sit through), this isnt bollywood. this is about a dirt poor kid making it through one of the most populous and dangerous cities of the world.

great stuff, and definitely worth trying to find at a theater.

katiemac
11-30-2008, 11:18 AM
I'm glad you enjoyed it. I've been hearing wonderful things about this movie everywhere. I'll make sure I don't pass on it--gotta find it in the area, first.

KTC
02-28-2009, 01:57 AM
I can't believe this thread died.


I just saw Slumdog...just finished watching a few minutes ago. It is my new favourite movie. I wanted to see it for months, but didn't make it until today. The best movie I ever saw.

maestrowork
02-28-2009, 02:06 AM
It's pretty great. And I'm really glad, actually, that it won Best Picture. Not that the other movies are not worthy, but there's just something that clicks with me with Slumdog (I guess growing up NEAR the slums didn't hurt my relating to the film either).

KTC
02-28-2009, 02:09 AM
I am spent. I was on the edge of my seat the entire time...and choking back a great desire to bawl. I think it was beautiful.

Bravo
02-28-2009, 02:10 AM
finally.

KTC
02-28-2009, 02:11 AM
finally.

payment in full, Bravo. Excellent choice indeed.

Bravo
02-28-2009, 02:12 AM
this was rocky 1,2, and 3 mixed with city of god.

it's phenomenal, i'm very happy that it's getting the recognition it deserves.

Bubastes
02-28-2009, 02:12 AM
I keep meaning to go see it. My Mom saw it twice already.

KTC
02-28-2009, 02:13 AM
Yes. I'm thrilled it won best movie. I will be picking it up on release day. I just want to tell everybody about it. (Still on the just-saw-it high)

Rarri
02-28-2009, 02:19 AM
I'm really wanting to see this, for what it's worth, the book is fantastic (published as Slumdog Millionaire and Q&A) :)

KTC
02-28-2009, 02:21 AM
I'm really wanting to see this, for what it's worth, the book is fantastic (published as Slumdog Millionaire and Q&A) :)


I will be picking up the book this weekend.

Empress_Isis
02-28-2009, 04:09 AM
I thought it was spectacular. I went with a friend who REALLY wanted to see it, and I was pretty "meh" about it. But I'm glad he got me to go, because it was just flawless. One of those rare movies where you are never bored by an unnecessary scene, never taken out of the story by bad acting, never disbelieving what is going on even if you should be. Highly recommended!

KTC
02-28-2009, 04:10 AM
I just picked up the book. It sounds quite a bit different, but I'm sure I'll love it too.

Gynn
02-28-2009, 04:40 AM
I really, really like the first half of 'Slumdog'. The quick cameras and lively music mimic the wild lives of the children. The second half was good, too, but not as good as the first.

maestrowork
02-28-2009, 06:29 AM
The parts with the children were the most riveting. Interesting, I find the adult Jamel and Latikah a bit lackluster, in comparison to the sensational children. Almost like, I'm not sure I really cared. But the children's stories really help glue the whole thing together.

Kind of reminds me of The Kite Runner. The children part of the story was so riveting and emotional that by comparison I found the adult part of the story lacking.

Perks
02-28-2009, 06:31 AM
I loved it. Hugely.

In fact, if I'd hadn't been obliged to fetch my children, I would have gotten back in line, bought another ticket and watched it again immediately. I can't remember the last time that happened.

Perks
02-28-2009, 08:24 PM
TDK excluded, this is the best film i have seen this year, and one of the best films i've seen in many years.

I keep trying to do the math on this one and can't figure out if Slumdog Millionaire comes out on top. I think you liked TDK better, which knocks you down a coupla rungs, Bravo.

I am in the odd group that didn't really care for The Dark Knight. (I know, I know, now I've similarly lost status, so we're back where we started. All's well.) It was endless, and like Wanted, didn't know when to zip up its fly. The worst part is, I wanted to like it. I like Christian Bale. I like Christopher Nolan. But outside The Joker (who was marvelous) I thought all the characters were very dull.

Besides them being so different that it's almost ridiculous to try and compare them, where TDK failed, Slumdog Millionaire got every story-telling element right.

KTC
02-28-2009, 08:55 PM
TDK was a good movie, but in a totally different league than Slumdog. TDK was one of those throwaway movies you go to so you can walk away going, 'Wow. Cool!' and then soon forget. It's a bubblegum movie. I loved it...but I won't watch it again...or if I do only because there is nothing else on. It was wow and forget. I have now watched Slumdog twice. And I can watch it again no problem. And again.

Kathleen42
02-28-2009, 09:01 PM
I didn't care for TDK either. Personally, I find the characteristics which made Bale a great Bateman make him a lousy Bruce Wayne.

I did, however, love Slumdog. It reaffirmed my faith in movies.

Bravo
02-28-2009, 09:19 PM
I keep trying to do the math on this one and can't figure out if Slumdog Millionaire comes out on top. I think you liked TDK better, which knocks you down a coupla rungs, Bravo.

i said TDK excluded, because it's just difficult to compare the two movies.

but really, this entire forum has already established that you have absolutely wrong opinions when it comes to movies (and probably TV shows too). for all rights, you should've been banned after saying you liked hancock, so i'm not going to even going to bother rebutting your critique of TDK and i'm going to place you on ignore now.

hopefully, one of the mods can take care of you in the meantime.

Perks
02-28-2009, 09:22 PM
Hancock was terrific good fun.

KTC
02-28-2009, 09:24 PM
Hancock was terrific good fun.

I agree. Joyous escapism.

Bravo
02-28-2009, 09:26 PM
is she still here?

Perks
02-28-2009, 09:29 PM
Oh god. Now I'm 'she'.

aruna
03-03-2009, 10:05 PM
Strangely enough, I didn't like Slumdog all that much. I find it hard to understand the love.
I saw it with two Indian friends and they had the same reaction.
I'm glad it won, though, and I'm glad people like it.
Maybe India's magic comes through in it to others, and we are just used to it! I can't tell.

I hear though that the kids are having a hard time readjusting to life back in the slums. They should never have been taken to America IMO.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/03/01/slumdog-kids-back-to-scho_n_170850.html

dclary
03-03-2009, 10:42 PM
That happens a lot to people who come to america. They discover that living in filth and depravity isn't always as awesome as it seems.

maestrowork
03-03-2009, 11:45 PM
Maybe India's magic comes through in it to others, and we are just used to it! I can't tell.

It's the same way I felt about Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. I don't know why everybody loves that movie. I guess I'm just used to that -- to me, I've seen those martial art moves and stories way too much.

aruna
03-04-2009, 11:48 AM
That happens a lot to people who come to america. They discover that living in filth and depravity isn't always as awesome as it seems.

It wasn't about America. It was being given a few days of five-star luxury treatment. Few people in America live the way those kids did for that little excerpt in time.

It would have been more humane to somehow ease them into an improved life, rather than plunge them into luxury and chuck them out again.

People can have a good life in India too. A very good and happy life.

Sheryl Nantus
03-04-2009, 05:56 PM
I hear though that the kids are having a hard time readjusting to life back in the slums. They should never have been taken to America IMO.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/03/01/slumdog-kids-back-to-scho_n_170850.html

frankly, I thought that was extremely cruel and manipulative of the producers and the movie's backers.

these kids get to come to AMERICA, get to visit Disneyland and do all the fun stuff that kids dream of... and then get dumped back in a life that they would NOW perceive as miserable.

how cruel is that?

oh, sure - they're getting "a school" built in the area and supposedly trust funds for the kids are set up, but I'd like to see a follow-up story in a year to see exactly what's happened to them and the rest of the cast. Dollars to donuts there's nothing left except some heart-broken kids.

extreme exploitation of the children.

but, hey... got us some Oscars!

:Soapbox:

maestrowork
03-04-2009, 06:31 PM
It would have been more humane to somehow ease them into an improved life, rather than plunge them into luxury and chuck them out again.

People can have a good life in India too. A very good and happy life.

I agree the whole five-star treatment was ridiculous but that's just Hollywood. At least the kids got to experience something outrageously interesting.

I disagree that it's "cruel." I grew up poor but my parents managed to take us to places like Disneyland (in Japan) and stayed in nice hotels while we traveled. Then we went back to our 200 sq. feet apartment with no air conditioning. It didn't "spoil" me. I think the kids saying, "We have a hard time adjusting back to our lives" is a bit much, actually. Kind of like when the kid in The Kite Runner said he couldn't stay in his country anymore and asked to come to America.... I think there is exploitation and manipulation on both sides.

Look, the producers hired them to be in a low-budget movie. Nobody expected it to be such a hit. But no one promised to bring these kids and their families out of poverty. It wasn't the deal. So now suddenly the producers owed the kids and their families? I don't buy that.

But Danny Boyle, probably out of pressure, have promised to help the kids out of their slums. So at least something good is going to come out of this, I hope.

aruna
03-04-2009, 10:54 PM
I disagree that it's "cruel." I grew up poor but my parents managed to take us to places like Disneyland (in Japan) and stayed in nice hotels while we traveled. Then we went back to our 200 sq. feet apartment with no air conditioning. It didn't "spoil" me. I think the kids saying, "We have a hard time adjusting back to our lives" is a bit much, actually. Kind of like when the kid in The Kite Runner said he couldn't stay in his country anymore and asked to come to America.... I think there is exploitation and manipulation on both sides.
.

I think it's a different situation to yours. You may have been poor but at least it was your parents' decision to take you to Disneyland etc and strive for a better life for you. These Hollywood folks are complete strangers who have no idea what the kids' life is really like and very probably thinking they are doing them a favour by providing an outlandishly fun time, while producing some excellent PR with cute slum kids. The whole idea of it I find distasteful; far too interfering. But this degree of outlandishness was completely out of proportion to the kids' lives and expectations.

I don't think the producers owe them any more than they have already done, and I an education ( in a trust fund) is the best payment altogether.

However, there is a moral/ethical aspect and it's up to them and their conscience how they deal with that.

maestrowork
03-04-2009, 11:00 PM
Like I said, Danny Boyle said he is going to try to take care of the kids. But whether it's a moral or ethical (I don't see it as ethical, though, since they're not in the business of saving the children -- they make movies! And I'm sure the producers paid what was fair to the kids -- if there were exploitation, I'm sure it would have surfaced already), the producers really have no obligations; otherwise, can you imagine them having to "take care" of every actor or child actor they ever hired to do a project?

I think it's really neat that they got to go to Disneyland and stay at a five-star hotel and walked the red carpet and met all these famous people. That's the kind of experiences that's sometimes only made possible by "Make a Wish." But no one pointed a gun at the families and said, "You had to go." They didn't go to London for the BAFTA. If I were one of those kids (I grew up near the slums, not in them), I would have loved that experience and tried not to make it into something like "the producers spoiled me now" thing.

aruna
03-04-2009, 11:20 PM
Like I said, Danny Boyle said he is going to try to take care of the kids. But whether it's a moral or ethical (I don't see it as ethical, though, since they're not in the business of saving the children -- they make movies!

I meant that in the sense of personal ethics; something that goes beyond what they are doing for a business. That would always be an individual decision, based on the individual case. So no, it woul dno tmean that because thet helped these kids, they'd have to help all children in movies.

Anyway, I hope that Mumbai slums becomes the new movie trend. I have two Mumbai slum novels, Hollywood can have them! And as a by-product perhaps something might change.

maestrowork
03-04-2009, 11:27 PM
I've heard they are tearing down some of the slums in Mumbai. What's going to happen there?

There are still a lot of slums in Hong Kong... it's hard to imagine an international finance center in the 21st century still has slums and children growing up there... but it is a complex social issue that I don't really understand.

The Lonely One
03-04-2009, 11:29 PM
No one has yet commented on the soundtrack of this movie. I didn't personally recognize the artists but I found the soundtrack extremely compelling (are they Indian artists?).

I also enjoyed the ending credits dance number; seemed to tie in with the MC's silly dance as a kid in the beginning of the film.

My fiancee hated the dance number. She said she wished she hadn't seen it and could have remembered the characters without it.

Different strokes?

maestrowork
03-04-2009, 11:33 PM
The ending number is rather Bollywood and I can see why some people would object to it (it's like of like Disneyfying or McDonaldizing something). I mean, the movie itself manages to avoid the Bollywood movie stigma but at the end, they tag on a Bollywood number... so some people may think it's tacky.

I enjoyed the number, though -- thought it was fun and a great way to end the movie -- it was kind of a "fantasy" to begin with. I liked the soundtrack but it's one of those that work REALLY well with the movie but are a bit disjointed and strange all by itself.

katiemac
03-04-2009, 11:44 PM
No one has yet commented on the soundtrack of this movie. I didn't personally recognize the artists but I found the soundtrack extremely compelling (are they Indian artists?).

I also enjoyed the ending credits dance number; seemed to tie in with the MC's silly dance as a kid in the beginning of the film.

My fiancee hated the dance number. She said she wished she hadn't seen it and could have remembered the characters without it.

Different strokes?

The soundtrack is great. A.R. Rahman, who did the majority of it, is Indian. M.I.A, who did some of the collaboration, is British but of Sri Lanken descent. It seems like she broke out into "mainstream" just about a year ago. Her song "Paper Planes," which is also on the Slumdog soundtrack, was pretty popular.

KTC
03-05-2009, 01:52 AM
I love the Indian music that I can get my hands on. The soundtrack had some good soundage on it.