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Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-24-2008, 04:56 PM
Even though I mostly detest Martha Stewart... I DO love her turkey recipe. For picture-perfect and delicious, you can't do better than this (http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/marthas-ultimate-thanksgiving-menu-roasted-brined-turkey).

It's kinda involved, but it's wonderful. Golden brown and very tasty and moist. The brining is the key - and you'd think it would make it too salty, but I promise it doesn't.

MattW
11-25-2008, 03:26 AM
Brining is the way to go, but the cheesecloth is something I might try another time...

Alphabeter
11-25-2008, 02:25 PM
Its like adding pickles to chicken. I never would have done but after a short stint at a Chick Filet (not quite how they spell it but it closed in six months), I can't have chicken sandwiches without dill pickle!

And with "natural" pickles and quality chicken (and breading), the salt content is surprisingly low as compared to grab'n'nuke frozen stuff.

icerose
11-25-2008, 07:01 PM
This is my favorite turkey recipe. I pulled it of Food Network about 5 years ago when my husband's grandfather died as I'd never made a turkey and food needed to be cooked and a turkey was thawed. It's requested every single year. Next year I'll have to try a brine, but I don't even cook with alcohol so I'll have to find an alternative.

Turkey with Herbes de Provence and Citrus Recipe courtesy
Giada De Laurentiis

(Herbes de Provence if your store does not carry it like mine does not.)
3 tablespoons oregano leaves
3 tablespoons thyme leaves
1 teaspoon basil leaves
1 teaspoon sage leaves
3 tablespoons savory
2 tablespoons lavender flowers
1 teaspoon rosemary

1 (14 to 15-pound) turkey, neck and giblets reserved
1 orange, cut into wedges
1 lemon, cut into wedges
1 onion, cut into wedges
6 fresh rosemary sprigs
6 fresh sage sprigs
6 fresh oregano sprigs
7 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons herbes de Provence
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
6 cups canned low-salt chicken broth (approximate amount)
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
To make the turkey: Position the rack in the lowest third of the
oven and preheat to 400 degrees F.

Rinse the turkey and pat it dry with paper towels. Place the turkey
on a rack set inside a large roasting pan. Place the orange and
lemon wedges, onion, and 2 sprigs of each fresh herb in the main
turkey cavity. Tie the legs together to hold the shape of the
turkey. Stir 2 tablespoons of butter, the herbes de Provence, oil,
and 1 1/2 teaspoons of each the salt and pepper in a small saucepan
over medium heat just until the butter melts. Rub the butter mixture
all over the turkey and between the turkey breast meat and skin.
Place the turkey neck and giblets in roasting pan. (Recipe can be
prepared up to this point 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Let
stand at room temperature 30 minutes before roasting.)

Cover the turkey breast with foil. Roast for 20 minutes. Pour 3 cups
of broth into the pan and stir to scrape up any brown bits on the
bottom of the pan. Add the remaining sprigs of fresh herbs to the
pan. Roast the turkey for 40 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to
350 degrees F. Remove the foil from the turkey; pour 1 more cup of
broth into the pan. Continue roasting the turkey until a meat
thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers
165 degrees F to 175 degrees F or until the juices run clear when
the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with a skewer, basting
occasionally with pan juices, about 1 hour and 30 minutes longer.
Transfer the turkey to a platter and tent with foil. Let stand 30
minutes while preparing the gravy.

To make the gravy: Strain the turkey pan juices from the roasting
pan through a sieve and into a 4-cup glass measuring cup; discard
the solids. Spoon off the fat from atop the pan juices. Add enough
chicken broth, about 1 to 2 cups, to the pan juices to measure 4
cups total. Melt the remaining butter in a heavy large saucepan over
medium-high heat. Add the flour and whisk for 1 minute. Gradually
whisk in the broth. Simmer until the gravy thickens slightly,
whisking often, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve
the turkey with the gravy.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-25-2008, 07:06 PM
Even if you don't use the wine, icerose, it'll be delicious. Use chicken or vegetable stock instead of the wine - with that much butter, it's bound to be good. :)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-25-2008, 07:11 PM
Yow! I just went surfing for Alton Brown's brined turkey recipe... and this popped up (http://www.foodnetworkstore.com/ProductDetail.aspx?R=147873&ccaid=FNFNRSS147873)! $159.00 for a single turkey!!!

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-25-2008, 07:18 PM
And here's the Alton Brown brined turkey (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/good-eats-roast-turkey-recipe/index.html) recipe. This is the first one I tried and it's every bit as tasty as the Martha Stewart recipe.

One note of caution for any recipe that starts out at 500 degrees: make sure you have a scrupulously clean oven... otherwise, you'll set off the smoke alarms and the burned goo on the inside of the oven will impart a piquant 'ick' taste to your bird.

Angelinity
11-25-2008, 07:21 PM
i'm about to cook my first whole turkey in years... she's thawing :e2yawn:

icerose
11-25-2008, 07:23 PM
And here's the Alton Brown brined turkey (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/good-eats-roast-turkey-recipe/index.html) recipe. This is the first one I tried and it's every bit as tasty as the Martha Stewart recipe.

One note of caution for any recipe that starts out at 500 degrees: make sure you have a scrupulously clean oven... otherwise, you'll set off the smoke alarms and the burned goo on the inside of the oven will impart a piquant 'ick' taste to your bird.

I have a roasting oven that is just for this sort of thing. It makes my life so much easier and steams it as much as it roasts it so when it's time to come out, the meat is actually pulling away from the bone and falling off. The first year I used it, I sawed right through the leg bone and didn't even realize I had struck bone,

The second time I pulled the legs off trying to get the turkey out.

Meerkat
11-25-2008, 07:27 PM
I thought this was going to be a thread all about Shishkabob and the like.

smoothseas
11-25-2008, 07:29 PM
One note of caution for any recipe that starts out at 500 degrees: make sure you have a scrupulously clean oven...



lol - now that's the truth. In order to silence ours, I have to unearth the stepstool from the deepest regions of the storage closet, all the while, the dang alarm continues to howl. How irritating!

Captshady
11-25-2008, 07:46 PM
A few years ago, on the Food Network I saw somone - either Giada, Emeril, or Rachel - stuff a turkey full of quartered apples, and put breast side down in a roasting pan at 250 for 30 minutes per pound. The part that caught my attention was the no basting required part. At the last half hour, I was told to turn the oven up to 400 and flip the bird breast side up to allow the skin to crisp. I tried it that thanksgiving and it was delicious. The hardest part was flipping the bird. I've since cooked another turkey and a few chickens this way.

MattW
11-26-2008, 01:41 AM
i'm about to cook my first whole turkey in years... she's thawing :e2yawn:Thawing right now!

Everyone who is going with a frozen bird should be thawing at the moment already, especially is you want to brine for at least 12 hours.

Angelinity
11-26-2008, 12:10 PM
Houston, we have a problem... the turkey won't fit in the oven! we'll have to quarter her :cry:

unless i can borrow the neighbors' kitchen...

icerose
11-26-2008, 07:15 PM
Houston, we have a problem... the turkey won't fit in the oven! we'll have to quarter her :cry:

unless i can borrow the neighbors' kitchen...

Go to wal-mart and buy a roasting oven. It costs 35 bucks and you'll never ever regret it. It'll fit the turkey.

It'll also keep your oven free for pies, rolls, and so forth. It's good for chicken, pot roast, pork roast, turkey, anything at all you need to roast, it's wonderful for. Have to make a big stew? No problem, it'll do that too. Even if you use it just once a year it's worth having.

Shadow_Ferret
11-28-2008, 07:56 PM
Brining? That just sounds horrible.

My mom makes the best turkey ever. She bakes it in a brown paper bag and it comes out with a crispy brown skin and the turkey meat is always moist. Normally the white meat is all dried out in other birds, but hers isn't.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-16-2009, 01:39 AM
As I'm wandering through the posts trying to help index the recipes, I stumbled across this thread again and just had to comment to Shadow Ferret: Trust me. The brining sounds terrible, I agree... I had to give myself some serious talking to and tried it before the holiday so I wouldn't be risking everything on a 'new method'. But it was one of the two best birds I've ever fixed or eaten. The meat is moist and not salty at all. It's wonderful.

Ken
05-16-2009, 02:53 AM
Even though I mostly detest Martha Stewart...

QFT

blacbird
05-16-2009, 07:05 AM
Instructions:

1. Bite leg off turkey. Domestic turkey bred to be really stupid, will not notice.

2. Eat leg.

caw

jane cooks
05-16-2009, 08:04 AM
A real chef here...always brine, or shove 4 sticks of butter under the skin on top of the breast and baste every 30 minutes with herb scented stock and more butter. I always trust Alton, Martha has failed me many times.... When you're done with the whole bird try ground turkey with cumin and pumpkin seeds with a squeeze of lime on top. Heaven in a burger.

blacbird
05-16-2009, 10:44 AM
Okay, more seriouser:

Did this last Thanksgiving, worked reallly well: Stuff the bird with cut-up citrus bits, lemons, limes, oranges, as stuffed as can get, and bake as you would with any other recipe. Turned out marvellous; you throw away the stuffed stuff, but it imparts a magnificent aromatic moistness to the bird.

Oh, yeah: Then you eat the bird.

caw