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View Full Version : Catch phrases that didn't 'catch'



poetinahat
05-10-2005, 05:56 AM
Hi all,

Every now and then, I'll see a film or a TV show where there's an obvious attempt to throw in some sort of wacky catchphrase, seemingly in the hope that it will find its way into common usage. Maybe this tactic is meant to lend a cult or camp status to an otherwise unremarkable work?

These aren't just bad dialogue, but they're glaring attempts to get the viewers to use the phrase elsewhere; they're forced into the dialogue and don't fit, and they make you just want to look away.

Here are a couple that spring to mind:

"Nobody puts Baby in a corner." -- Dirty Dancing
"You shoplifted the pootie, didn't you?" -- Jerry Maguire*
"You had me at hello." -- Ibid.

Anyone? Bueller? (whoops.)

robeiae
05-10-2005, 07:16 AM
"I did not have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinski."

three seven
05-10-2005, 01:23 PM
"You had me at hello."Stick that into Google and you'll get about 16500 hits, made up largely of direct references to the legend that is the quote, and offers of T-shirts with the quote printed on them. Oh, and discussions about the hilarity of spoofing it in other films. So I'd have to say that one caught. ;)

Speaking of T-shirts, why do people insist on calling them 'TEE shirts?' The whole point of a T-shirt is that it's shaped like a T. Who exactly fits into a shirt shaped like 'T-E-E'? Or are we supposed to infer that the shirt looks like a golf tee? Cos it f***ing doesn't.

poetinahat
05-10-2005, 01:41 PM
Stick that into Google and you'll get about 16500 hits, ... So I'd have to say that one caught. ;)

Speaking of T-shirts, why do people insist on calling them 'TEE shirts?'

Point taken on 'hello' -- but I'm willing people to believe it hasn't caught! It isn't exactly "We'll always have Paris", is it? :Soapbox:

About T-shirts: agree. We don't say "Why-fronts", do we??? (Never mind that the Y is upside down. Then again, it would be right side up if the wearer bent over to look at it.)

maestrowork
05-10-2005, 01:59 PM
"In case I don't see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!" -- the Truman Show

"I hate knowing everything." -- Armageddon


And yes, "You had me at hello" caught on all right. That and "show me the money."

Wormo
05-10-2005, 02:47 PM
"In case I don't see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!" -- the Truman Show

I thought this catchphrase did 'catch on' after it, it was voted as a movie great.

"That's My Mama!" - If anyone could tell me what the devil this is from? i'd appreciate it

"Biddy biddy biddy biddy biddy" - The robot from Buck Rodgers

Sarita
05-10-2005, 02:49 PM
It isn't exactly "We'll always have Paris", is it?

Nothing will ever be "We'll always have Paris" or "Here's lookin at you, kid" for that matter. :)

Wormo
05-10-2005, 02:50 PM
Speaking of T-shirts, why do people insist on calling them 'TEE shirts?' The whole point of a T-shirt is that it's shaped like a T. Who exactly fits into a shirt shaped like 'T-E-E'? Or are we supposed to infer that the shirt looks like a golf tee? Cos it f***ing doesn't.

I've never seen anybody use this spelling over here, it's always "T-shirts for sale!" and stuff in the shops. Maybe it's just a Norfolk thing

three seven
05-10-2005, 04:29 PM
Maybe it's just a Norfolk thingBehave

mmm... pancakes
05-10-2005, 04:34 PM
Apparently the makers of the Simpsons - with all their successes at introducing phrases ("d'oh" and "mmm... (insert food here)" as two examples) only once conciously tried to do so. The phrase they hoped would catch on was "pulled a Homer," meaning to succeed despite idiocy.

underthecity
05-10-2005, 08:08 PM
"That's My Mama!" - If anyone could tell me what the devil this is from? i'd appreciate it
I sure don't know what movie it's from, but Peter said it in near the end of an episode of (the original run) of Family Guy, the one where he became a vice president at a tobacco company.

underthecity

VA Buckeye
05-10-2005, 09:40 PM
I sure don't know what movie it's from, but Peter said it in near the end of an episode of (the original run) of Family Guy, the one where he became a vice president at a tobacco company.

underthecity

You have forgotten the now-classic tv series "That's My Mama (http://www.tvtome.com/tvtome/servlet/ShowMainServlet/showid-708/Thats_My_Mama/)?"

Liam Jackson
05-10-2005, 09:57 PM
I think the worst "failed" catch phrase of all time has to be that *shudder*
"Waa-waa-waa" thing that Chachi (sp?) did in the final seasons of Happy Days

JoeEkaitis
05-11-2005, 12:07 AM
"Bunny," Harvey Comics' answer to "Archie," tried to add "zoovy" to the vocabulary of American teenagers in the 1960's. It became as popular as their other in-word, "yvoorg."

Wormo
05-11-2005, 12:33 AM
I sure don't know what movie it's from, but Peter said it in near the end of an episode of (the original run) of Family Guy, the one where he became a vice president at a tobacco company.

underthecity

heheh.

"Give me a snappy line to go out on boys!"
"But it's out lunch break" ... walks away

.....

"That's my Mama!... hehehe"

robeiae
05-11-2005, 03:08 AM
Speaking of T-shirts, why do people insist on calling them 'TEE shirts?' The whole point of a T-shirt is that it's shaped like a T. Who exactly fits into a shirt shaped like 'T-E-E'?

We don't write symbols, we write words..."T-E-E" is how you spell the letter "t", so there! That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

Rob

three seven
05-11-2005, 03:22 AM
Funny, I always thought it was spelled 'T'. Since when did the letter T have three letters in it?

rhymegirl
05-11-2005, 03:37 AM
Tee shirts are for golfers. Ha ha.

Eric Summers
05-11-2005, 07:26 AM
I can't remember the name of the movie, but it was like "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" without all the funny parts.

But the phrase that they kept trying to push through all of their commercials and through the movie was "It's casual"

- Eric

maestrowork
05-11-2005, 08:29 AM
Nothing wrong with some Tees and Aays.

Rose
05-11-2005, 08:41 AM
Funny, I always thought it was spelled 'T'. Since when did the letter T have three letters in it?
All serious Scrabble players know the letter "t" is spelled tee. Then again, so is the golf tee, so maybe that's not the best example. In Spanish Scrabble (and I do have the Spanish board, letters, and official Scrabble Player's Dictionary which sells for $3 in Argentina), it's te. Then again, te is a good word in Spanish whether it's a letter or not.

reph
05-11-2005, 09:03 AM
Shakespeare in Love: "It's a mystery."

maestrowork
05-11-2005, 09:04 AM
Princess Bride: "It's inconceivable."

poetinahat
05-11-2005, 09:15 AM
Princess Bride: "It's inconceivable."

Nice one! From the same film: "As you wiiiiiiiiiish"

robeiae
05-11-2005, 07:25 PM
Princess Bride: "It's inconceivable."

"You keep saying that word...I do not think it means what you think it means."

BTW, no "It's", just "Inconceivable!"

tjwriter
05-11-2005, 11:28 PM
Now I want to go watch that movie (The Princess Bride). I gotta go visit Mom and Dad. :wag:

Solatium
05-13-2005, 01:56 AM
I've got to put in my vote for ". . . I gave him life!" from Re-Animator. The line worked, but it didn't work in context -- which is why I think there was some other reason for its inclusion. It doesn't work as a true catchphrase because, well, how many situations are there where you can find a reason to say it?

Another:
The folks at MST3K sawed away at "Hi-keeba!" for years, but I never got it. Maybe that's just me. Or them.

trumancoyote
05-13-2005, 02:22 AM
It makes me sad that 'rufus' from Never Been Kissed never made it to popular usage.

poetinahat
05-13-2005, 05:47 AM
From Seinfeld:
"Serenity now!" Yes or no?

PattiTheWicked
05-13-2005, 07:16 AM
From Seinfeld:
"Serenity now!" Yes or no?

"Spongeworthy" has certainly made it into the lexicon of American vocabulary.

Liam Jackson
05-13-2005, 07:19 AM
Serenity Now had some sort lived success with the diehards, but Kramer's Hoochie Momma still makes the rounds.

poetinahat
05-17-2005, 04:52 AM
Anybody remember Fred Flintstone's "Bee-hee-hee HO-HOoooo!"

maestrowork
05-17-2005, 05:07 AM
"Spongeworthy" has certainly made it into the lexicon of American vocabulary.

As did "master of one's domain" and "I'm out."

poetinahat
05-17-2005, 05:47 AM
"Spongeworthy" has certainly made it into the lexicon of American vocabulary.

Unlike a lot of Yank culture, it hasn't infiltrated the Australian lexicon yet ;)

But there are plenty of Aussies who dial 911 in an emergency, instead of the proper 000, thanks to American TV shows. (By the way, there are no shrimp on our barbies. They're prawns!)