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Thomas_Anderson
11-18-2008, 11:03 AM
Hi, I'm kinda new here. So, uh hi.

Anyway, let me just start off by saying I know the writing career isn't as easy as publish one or two books and you're a famous celebrity in a mansion. No, I know that's about as far from the truth as possible, and you have to work really hard to get your foot in that door. However, I'm talking about after one gets established, and there's always that chance I'd become really big, but even if I do not become really big and famous, there'd still be a good number of books and stories with my name on them. Also, even small time writers, and friends of writers sometimes get interviews, right?

Now, for the question. I've heard the horror stories of famous people, or warnings for potentially famous people who could or do regret the things they've posted on the internet. I haven't done anything bad, just the typical flames on the internet, since I was younger then. However, nothing with my face or real name. Also, aside from petty squabbling over the internet, I don't want to be under the public microscope, simply because I just don't want to be bothered, and my family wouldn't want it anymore than me.

I want to get into sci-fi/fantasy fiction writing, and possibly journalism (likely gaming, but we'll see where that road leads). I know this must sound kinda paranoid, but I feel I just need to ask this as this fear may keep me away from writing. The guys who didn't like me from high school, and those who would disagree with me online, is there any chance that it'd come back to haunt me? Or is it basically just actors and politicians who have to worry about that stuff? Is Stephen King and Rowling under that constant microscope? Basically, it'd be nice to have my stories get attention, but I just don't want that much attention. Do you have to want to be under that microscope to be there?

Oh, and before you suggest it, I'd prefer not to use a pseudonym. If I become big enough, people could find out anyway. Besides, it just complicates things such as book signings and the like.

Karen Duvall
11-18-2008, 11:21 AM
Let me assure you that fame is the least of your worries. Your chances of becomeing famous for your writing are the same as winning the lottery. Probably worse. I don't think you have much to worry about. Once you get your first dozen or so rejections, your mind should be eased. You can breathe a huge sigh of relief after you've been writing for a couple of years and you're still struggling to get your first break. Even if you get an agent and a book contract right out of the gate, it would be highly unlikely you'll ever become a household name.

Don't let your fear of fame get in the way of your desire to write. It will only block you and prevent you from having a chance at success, slim as it may be. I can put your mind at ease right now. It won't happen. You'll write your book and love it and write another one, or you won't. Fame will have nothing to do with it. Good luck!

katiemac
11-18-2008, 11:33 AM
Welcome. :)

I don't think this is an unfounded worry, but it's not restricted to writing fame--or maybe, in this information age, restricted to even fame. The majority of individuals who are famous now (like King and Rowling) didn't really go through the Facebook and MySpace phenomenon that has become the norm. It's easy to find photos and contact info for many people. We'll see a shift in that kind of attention in a couple years, I'm sure, when people from this generation become famous. Maybe past discretions will become meaningless (everyone has them) or maybe not.

However, I think you have little to actually worry about because as Karen said, this kind of fame is rare and second, you have the foresight to know that what you do on the Internet isn't separate from your real, professional life. I wouldn't worry about skirmishes with old high school rivals--I've never heard such a thing from any celebrity or politican, and I doubt everyone liked Barack Obama or Stephen King in high school.

Like anything, be smart about what you do and say online and you'll be fine.

Nymtoc
11-18-2008, 11:43 AM
Your fears seem very premature. Writing isn't all about fame and being under a microscope. In fact, for most of us, writing has very little to do with such things. We write because we want to (or have to, in some cases), or because writing is part of a profession, like journalism, that interests us most.

Anyone who puts him- or herself forward in a public way--as writer, artist, musician, dancer, actor, filmmaker or whatever--is apt to come under public scrutiny, whether favorable or unfavorable. Usually the scrutiny is centered on the work itself--prizes on the one hand, negative criticism on the other. Most writers never get much attention at all, and you usually have to become a celebrity before the attention gets personal. The tiny percentage of writers who become celebrities either have thick skins to start with or have have managed to develop them.

I'm guessing you are fairly young (your reference to "the guys who didn't like me in high school.") By the time you're a huge success, I feel sure the worries you express here will have dissipated.

:D

Thomas_Anderson
11-18-2008, 11:50 AM
But JKR got famous in three books, and Chris Paolini got it in one. Granted that's a long shot but still. What about farther down the road, say five, ten years. My name isn't Tom Anderson, it's a movie reference, but nobody would know who I am even I were to become famous, right?

katiemac
11-18-2008, 11:58 AM
But JKR got famous in three books, and Chris Paolini got it in one. Granted that's a long shot but still. What about farther down the road, say five, ten years. My name isn't Tom Anderson, it's a movie reference, but nobody would know who I am even I were to become famous, right?

Probably not, but then again I'm no techie expert. There are all sorts of things like IP addresses that can lead you back to someone on the Internet, but I don't know how to do that. I'm not sure the average person does.

The thing about big fame is that nobody can expect it or plan for it. But if you wouldn't talk about it in real life, don't discuss it on the Internet. That's not fame-specific. It's no secret that employers Google names and resumes. Teens have been kicked out of school for what they posted on MySpace.

Just be smart, that's all. And let's face it--Rowling and Paolini did get famous in only a couple of books, but what's the worst thing you've heard about them? Nothing you can't deal with, and fans like the books so much they don't care what somebody random has to say about the authors.

Polenth
11-18-2008, 12:47 PM
Most writers seem to have a comfortable level of fame. They get invited to do interviews and attend things, but rarely get recognised in the street.

Hollywood actors and politicians have this tendency to do news-worthy things. Like have affairs and get involved in dodgey business dealings. They also tend to move to big cities where the media can see them. You don't have to do any of that. Live out in the sticks somewhere and keep it legal (some actors and singers opt to do just that, and don't get hounded by the media as a result).

blacbird
11-18-2008, 12:56 PM
Another matter I don't need to worry about.

caw

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 01:14 PM
LOL @ the posting. For myself, I've been in skirmishes on the internet, and using my real name too, I've even been banned forever from one site and have to use a pseudonym to still use it. But I don't worry about that, to me, it shows people that I have strength of character and won't be quieted just because I've stepped on someone else's toes... I'm not a sheep.
I would be more worried about people finding out the embarrassing things I've done in my real life, rather than on the internet :D

Phaeal
11-18-2008, 04:56 PM
We will always know how to find you, Mr. Anderson.

Now for some cheap (free) psychoanalysis, your worry about instant fame is probably just one more excuse to delay writing. We all have plenty of them. The other possibility is that you long for fame behind this coy mask of aversion. Another not uncommon ailment.

The bottom line is: If you really want to write, write. The work itself must be your core concern, not any byproduct of the work. Otherwise, why bother? The last thing the world needs is another hollow book*.






*Eliot's original version:

We are the hollow books,
We are the stuffed books,
Leaning together, dustcovers stuffed with straw...

This is the way literature ends,
This is the way literature ends,
This is the way literature ends,
Not with a bang, but a whimper.

Toothpaste
11-18-2008, 05:04 PM
There is no such thing as true anonymity on the internet. You can get away with quite a bit of anonymity, but the tech savvy of your fans would probably be able to track you down if they put enough effort into it. Whether or not you actually become famous (you already know the odds), it is still worth remembering that everything you put out on the internet stays on the internet. Even if you think you've deleted it.

I write for children. Therefore I am very careful in my language and references to certain topics. I don't pretend that my presence here or on other boards isn't an adult one, with adults opinions, but I am a lot more careful with how and what I say than when I am hanging out with my friends. My blog, which IS under my name, and has been found by some of my readers, though written for adults, lacks any "adult" themes or nature, and I avoid swearing altogether.

But this is a choice I made. I have many opportunities hanging out with my friends to be relaxed and myself 100%, I don't need to use such a public space as the internet for that. You have to choose how you want people to perceive you, if you want to be entirely open an honest, that is a totally valid choice, if you want to keep some things to yourself, that too is your decision to make.

Even if fame never comes your way, it bodes well to not think of the internet as entirely anonymous. Aside from the fact that it isn't, it makes one have to think before writing things down, it makes one a bit more sensitive about others' feelings as opposed to safe hiding behind a mask.

If anyone is interested, I actually wrote a blog entry on this topic a while ago: http://ididntchoosethis.blogspot.com/2008/02/anonymous.html

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 05:04 PM
Plenty of people on AW know my real name - my real full name, I mean. For reasons of privacy I prefer they call me SP or anything related to my username instead of directly identifying me but the odd one still slips through now and again.

I'm sure if someone wanted to trace me they could, especially as I have a photo of myself on my profile and have been open about the city in which I live, in the past.

There's always a paper trail or e-trail leading you back to someone; it just comes down to are you important enough for someone to bother? Most times the answer is no, but there's always some loon out there or someone bearing a grudge.

I know for a fact there are people out there who dislike me enough to bitch and moan when I hit the big time - and yes it will happen! :D Does it bother me enough to avoid fame, or should I say, success? No. They're not important enough to me for me to hold back from trying to make my dreams a reality.

However, I know - I just know - there's embarrassing stuff out there that's going to come back and bite me some day. Ex boyfriends, old blog posts, silly stuff I said in the heat of the moment.

Ah well, I can deal.

If you're connected to the internet, you're traceable. That's all there is to it.

I know people often say, "If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, don't say it at all." Well I'm ballsy enough to get in your face and say it, so...my words being on the internet isn't that much of a problem for me. It'll be embarrassing some days, no doubt, but...meh. They're out there now, nothing I can do to un-say them.

maestrowork
11-18-2008, 05:13 PM
Writers are low on the fame totem pole, even the superstars such as King or Rowling. Don't sweat it.

When you become a superstar, let us know, because truly I don't keep track.

NeuroFizz
11-18-2008, 05:18 PM
Welcome to AW, and don't take anything below as a slam. It's blunt, but it's meant to be a serious look at this business (and on behavior on the internet).

Reality check #1. Your view of writing is grandiose, and while we all hope you achieve your writing goal, we have to direct your focus on the ground, not on the clouds. And on the ground are your written words--your books. You will be judged by your written work. No one will care if you had high school enemies (and even they can't dislodge your books). If you have been rude and made enemies on the internet, you will still be judged by your written work. If you have done anything to embarrass yourself on the internet and some jerk dredges it up, it won't take away your written work. Your worry right now should be what's right in front of you, on the ground, not the ethereal mysticism up in the clouds. If you want to reach for those clouds, you first have to wallow in the dirt with the rest of us "small time writers."

Reality check #2. Internet behavior (as well as real-life behavior) should be controlled, not because something may come back to bite you once you become famous, but because it is the right thing to do. Period.

Reality check #3. The kind of fame you are asking about comes to probably less than 1% of the published writers out there. Realize that the other 99% of published writers are what you are calling "small time writers":

Also, even small time writers, and friends of writers sometimes get interviews, right?
I suspect most of those published writers will find your characterization to be insulting, particularly since you will have to work your a$$ off, and be quite talented, just to be included in this club of "small time writers."

So, I would suggest an attitude adjustment. Roll up your sleeves and join us on the surface of this planet. The only way to live in the clouds is to earn it, and that takes hard work, it takes the ability to soak up advice and criticism, and it takes a little humility (although this business is very good at slamming it into us). Oh, yeah. Sometimes it takes a good dose of luck as well. Stay with us. Share your experience and we'll share ours, and we all can improve in this business.

One other thing. Once you get your first publishing contract, come back and re-read the original post of yours in this thread. I suspect you'll be entertained. And it will speak of the tremendous growth you've achieved to become successfully published.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 05:21 PM
Ditto. Actually, I'm much more tactless in real life than I am on the internet. You can rewrite something before you send it via a computer, whereas saying it doesn't give us that option, it's not like we can actually rewind it is it ;)


I know people often say, "If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, don't say it at all." Well I'm ballsy enough to get in your face and say it, so...my words being on the internet isn't that much of a problem for me. It'll be embarrassing some days, no doubt, but...meh. They're out there now, nothing I can do to un-say them.

"A" Is For "Agent"
11-18-2008, 05:42 PM
AW. Thread. Of. 2008.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 05:43 PM
Ditto. Actually, I'm much more tactless in real life than I am on the internet. You can rewrite something before you send it via a computer, whereas saying it doesn't give us that option, it's not like we can actually rewind it is it ;)

Google cache knows all and google cache sees all.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 05:52 PM
Well, ya know, I'd be more worried about people seeing the awful typos and grammar mistakes I've made, than anything I'd actually said on the net ;)


Google cache knows all and google cache sees all.

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 06:54 PM
Man, and here I am worrying about if I'll ever be taken seriously enough and if my stories hold merit; fame never even crossed my mind. Some people just have it easy, I guess. I wish I were at a point where I didn't have to worry about the quality of my writing anymore, and instead worry about how hard I'll have it being rich and famous. :D

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 06:59 PM
But JKR got famous in three books, and Chris Paolini got it in one. Granted that's a long shot but still. What about farther down the road, say five, ten years. My name isn't Tom Anderson, it's a movie reference, but nobody would know who I am even I were to become famous, right?

Thomas, Christopher Paollini was a marketing ploy and JK Rowling just happened to write the right book at the right time. I'm not saying that you have no chance of becoming a huge worldwide best seller, but if that's the only reason you're in this business, you need a reality check. You've a better chance of finding the Holy Grail.

If all you want to do is become famous, make a Youtube video of you doing something stupid.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 07:01 PM
Yes, but when you're running away from snapping photographers, autograph hunters, and sex-starved groupies, you'll know where you were better off, won't you! :D

I would hate all of that paparazzi crap. I'd be the one in the newspapers every day for hitting some over zealous photographer with my pink handbag lol.


I wish I were at a point where I didn't have to worry about the quality of my writing anymore, and instead worry about how hard I'll have it being rich and famous. :D

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 07:10 PM
I can't stand the media, which idiolizes the self-absorbed, vain and petty. It's never about the art with celebrities. It's about where they bought their dress or who they're hooking up with or what they have to say about environmental issues, like they honestly pondered a solution. This is one of the reasons I respect writers so much. Most are down to earth and keep out of the limelight. It's about the work. That's all that matters.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 07:17 PM
I couldn't agree with you more.

smcc360
11-18-2008, 07:29 PM
Thomas, I can understand and appreciate your concerns. In today's fast-paced digital age, it's all too easy to become innundated by unwanted attention, tossed upon the seas of public acclaim, and torn asunder by the riptide of critical backlash.

So here's the plan: Once you've crafted the novel which will establish you as the Brett Easton Ellis/Tucker Max of your generation, feel free to slap my name on the cover. Yes, that's right. I will bear the brunt of the fame, fortune, and acclaim that will pour down like a Himalayan avalanche, leaving you free to Create.

As a two-fisted man of action, I'm ready to endure the rigorous onslaught of blood-sucking paparazzi, obsessed Annie Wilkes-esque fans, and jaded, sexually ravenous young heiresses. Because helping people isn't just something I do. It's something I am.

Good luck to you. And I wish you all the success with your writing that you could hope for.

PS- I express these same sentiments, and this same offer, to all members of AW.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 08:00 PM
I can't stand the media, which idiolizes the self-absorbed, vain and petty. It's never about the art with celebrities. It's about where they bought their dress or who they're hooking up with or what they have to say about environmental issues, like they honestly pondered a solution. This is one of the reasons I respect writers so much. Most are down to earth and keep out of the limelight. It's about the work. That's all that matters.


I couldn't agree with you more.

I couldn't agree with you less.

Tarring all celebrities with the same brush seems more than a trifle unfair to me. It's 'never' about the art? Oh? For everyone who's famous? Wow.

And celebrities are allowed to have opinions on environmental issues too, just as we are, by virtue of the fact they're people with brains. Yes, brains.

There are some famous folks I can't stand. Some I like.

Bit like the rest of the population really.

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 08:01 PM
I couldn't agree with you less.

Tarring all celebrities with the same brush seems more than a trifle unfair to me. It's 'never' about the art? Oh? For everyone who's famous? Wow.

And celebrities are allowed to have opinions on environmental issues too, just as we are, by virtue of the fact they're people with brains. Yes, brains.

There are some famous folks I can't stand. Some I like.

Bit like the rest of the population really.

I blamed the media, not the celebrities. Sorry for the misunderstanding.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 08:03 PM
Oh the media.

Damn it all to hell!

(Except for when Parky resurrects his career and decides his first guest must be me, fresh from my eleventy billionth Booker win).

Mr Flibble
11-18-2008, 08:20 PM
(Except for when Parky resurrects his career and decides his first guest must be me, fresh from my eleventy billionth Booker win).

Yeah but you'd have to spend an hour with him brown-nosing you. Far too much of a suck up. I'd rather be on Al Murray's chatshow - at least you get a beer ( or a fruit based drink for the ladies. Luckily cider is fruit based ;)) and some chuckles.

As for the rest of it - we should be so lucky. Why worry about something that's as likely as being struck by a meteorite at the exact same time you win the lottery?

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 08:23 PM
Parky can brown-nose me all he likes. He's a leg-end!

Ah, but the media, eh? Fame, fortune, sex-crazed groupies. All that money and travelling on book tours.

Awful, isn't it?

Mr Flibble
11-18-2008, 08:24 PM
It depends - are the sex crazed groupies the right sex? If they are, are they all built like darts players? In which case...It'd be pretty bad.

mscelina
11-18-2008, 08:26 PM
Pfffffffffffffft.

This is like worrying about where you're going to be in heaven or hell after you die. All anyone needs to worry about is telling a good story, writing a good book, being a good person. If you're like me *shrug* you only worry about two of those.

Fact of the matter is, your privacy is more likely to be invaded as a result of being an ass online than it is from any sort of fame or fortune as a writer. To worry about this before you've even written a book is disingenuous at best.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 08:26 PM
Preferably male, open-minded about female, but preferably looking like Angelina Jolie if so.

Mr Flibble
11-18-2008, 08:27 PM
I'm tempted to post something outrageous, just so I have something to regret when I'm famous :)

Darzian
11-18-2008, 08:58 PM
This is like worrying about where you're going to be in heaven or hell after you die.


:e2seesaw:

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 09:09 PM
Pfffffffffffffft.
All anyone needs to worry about is telling a good story, writing a good book, being a good person.
I concur.

JoNightshade
11-18-2008, 09:13 PM
JK Rowling is arguably the most famous writer living. I'm a writer and an avid reader, and while I'm not a huge fan of Harry Potter I've read the first book and seen all the movies.

...And I have no clue what she looks like.

Yeah, methinks any author worrying about fame is going a little overboard. Nobody cares about the person behind the typewriter.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2008, 09:17 PM
All that publicity and you don't know what she looks like? Her photo's on every one of her books and there have been countless documentaries about her!

But yes, she is the most famous writer alive if not actually the best writer. When it comes to fame, though, I know what Stephen King looks like, James Herbert, Stephenie Meyer...just about all the authors I could name.

But that's possibly because I'm a reader. I go out of my way to seek out works by certain people. The man in the street? Probably none the wiser.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 09:23 PM
That was my take on it too. They build people up and then knock them down again and expect everyone else to hold their same points of view. I'm just glad the celebrity I adore isn't famous in the UK media...It would be okay if they slagged off his awful media-loving, bobble-headed, wife though :D


I blamed the media, not the celebrities.

Samantha's_Song
11-18-2008, 09:28 PM
If you need any help, just give me a call... ;)


I'm tempted to post something outrageous, just so I have something to regret when I'm famous :)

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 09:33 PM
I know what Stephen King looks like,

Oh man, I really wish I didn't know what Stephen King looks like.

maestrowork
11-18-2008, 10:08 PM
I know one of these days my 32280 posts on here are going to haunt me.

But I don't care. I would be sailing on my personal yacht or flying in my private jet anyway, and I have more things to worry about, like paparazzi. There are worse things than a random typo or some drug-induced political rambling -- like pantiless pictures while getting out of a BMW, or an accidental baby with one of my groupies, or something.

Thomas_Anderson
11-18-2008, 10:23 PM
Welcome to AW, and don't take anything below as a slam. It's blunt, but it's meant to be a serious look at this business (and on behavior on the internet).

Reality check #1. Your view of writing is grandiose, and while we all hope you achieve your writing goal, we have to direct your focus on the ground, not on the clouds. And on the ground are your written words--your books. You will be judged by your written work. No one will care if you had high school enemies (and even they can't dislodge your books). If you have been rude and made enemies on the internet, you will still be judged by your written work. If you have done anything to embarrass yourself on the internet and some jerk dredges it up, it won't take away your written work. Your worry right now should be what's right in front of you, on the ground, not the ethereal mysticism up in the clouds. If you want to reach for those clouds, you first have to wallow in the dirt with the rest of us "small time writers."

I thought I made it kinda clear in my first paragraph that I realize what a longshot this is, and it wouldn't happen instantly, if at all. I'm talking about the future here.

Although that talk about me being judged based on my own written word is quite comforting.


Reality check #3. The kind of fame you are asking about comes to probably less than 1% of the published writers out there. Realize that the other 99% of published writers are what you are calling "small time writers":

I suspect most of those published writers will find your characterization to be insulting, particularly since you will have to work your a$$ off, and be quite talented, just to be included in this club of "small time writers."

I didn't intend for "small time" to be insulting, and I apologize to any who took offense. I was only contrasting to the big ones like King and Rowling. I didn't in any way mean that other published writer who aren't household names are somehow inferior.

Also, I most certainly do not want to get into writing solely for the fame. In fact, just the opposite. I want to get into writing successfully with as little fame as possible. Why do I want to write? Well, speaking in terms of career choice, it is the one that really interests me the most, as you do something a little different everyday. Speaking in terms of just the craft, I just want to spread stories, I love writing.

As for being smart on the internet, well, that advise would've been helpful a couple years ago. I know now certain things are less than wise on the internet, too bad I couldn't have been this smart in the past. If only I had a time machine...


Hollywood actors and politicians have this tendency to do news-worthy things. Like have affairs and get involved in dodgey business dealings. They also tend to move to big cities where the media can see them. You don't have to do any of that. Live out in the sticks somewhere and keep it legal (some actors and singers opt to do just that, and don't get hounded by the media as a result).

So, in order to get fame, one has to want it? So if I just stay here in the suburbs, I'll be safe from fame?

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 10:26 PM
So, in order to get fame, one has to want it? So if I just stay here in the suburbs, I'll be safe from fame?

All you have to do to become famous these days is strike up a conversation with Barack Obama. Piece of cake. You get a book deal and all.

maestrowork
11-18-2008, 10:31 PM
So, in order to get fame, one has to want it? So if I just stay here in the suburbs, I'll be safe from fame?

Yes, and yes. Stephen King, as famous as he is, lives in relative peace and anonymity in Maine (I think he moved, but I could be wrong). Many writers continue to have their privacy and normal life, despite their "mega-stardom" in the literary world.

Just because everyone knows your name doesn't mean suddenly you have people stalking you, or have photographers chasing you around. Like I said, writers are low on the celebrity totem pole. Most people don't even know what a writer looks like, least of all spot them in a crowded room. You may see huge lines at a book signing, or writers convention, or any marketing events, but I doubt Neil Gaiman has any problem with privacy and he seems to live quite a quiet life with his family in Minneapolis. For example, at comic con, the fangirls were screaming for the actors 1000x more than they did Stephenie Meyers. Writers simply don't get much attention. Daniel Radcliffe gets a million times attention than JK Rowling.

Writers, by media standards, are boring. Most media would rather chase after Paris Hilton or Hilary Clinton.

Seriously, you're way ahead of yourself. Even when you become a super famous writer, it's still not something you should be worried about.

Cybernaught
11-18-2008, 10:33 PM
I remember all the coverage on Stephen King's alcohol addiction years ago. If anything, it probably helped his sales more than hurt them. How else do you market a book about toasters killing people without telling buyers that the writer was drunk for most of his career?

scarletpeaches
11-19-2008, 01:12 AM
Cybernaught.

If I read a book about toasters killing people, I'd automatically think the author was on crack anyway.

mscelina
11-19-2008, 01:17 AM
I remember all the coverage on Stephen King's alcohol addiction years ago. If anything, it probably helped his sales more than hurt them. How else do you market a book about toasters killing people without telling buyers that the writer was drunk for most of his career?

*hic*

That's what I'm counting on.

*hic*

pass the scotch, please.

Cybernaught
11-19-2008, 01:20 AM
Hell then, I'll take one too.

blacbird
11-19-2008, 01:24 AM
All anyone needs to worry about is telling a good story, writing a good book, being a good person.

I feel like I just struck out, swinging, on three pitches.

caw

scarletpeaches
11-19-2008, 01:25 AM
*hic*

That's what I'm counting on.

*hic*

pass the scotch, please.

Will I get away with a book about vampires if I tell everyone I'm a crack addict?

maestrowork
11-19-2008, 01:25 AM
I feel like I just struck out, swinging, on three pitches.

caw

Don't worry, you can always play hockey.

Thomas_Anderson
11-19-2008, 10:17 AM
So the King could be on this very board, and nobody would ever know, except King of course?

mscelina
11-19-2008, 10:26 AM
Nope. And most people wouldn't care. There really aren't a lot of identity spies on this forum. Heck, usually the only time I click on a profile is if someone ticks me off. We have a significant number of published authors, professional editors and well-known agents that do frequent AW and they aren't being hounded by legions of adoring fans. We are all writers here and the golden rule of the board is to "respect your fellow writer."

So yeah--no one gets harassed...except for maestrowork of course, but that has a lot to do with chocolate pants.

BlueLucario
11-19-2008, 04:44 PM
I hope I'm not derailing this post, but why worry about fame? Why wouldn't you want 10,000 readers reading and liking your book?

Bubastes
11-19-2008, 05:41 PM
Having lots of readers is different than being famous. You can have lots of readers and still remain relatively anonymous. Thank goodness.

maestrowork
11-19-2008, 06:39 PM
Having lots of readers is different than being famous. You can have lots of readers and still remain relatively anonymous. Thank goodness.

That's what attracts me to writing, partially. I'm also an actor, and I love the work, but I realized a while ago that I did not like the attention. I got really uptight about it. And I'm not even "famous" by any standard. Being a writer, I think, is an ideal -- you can have success and millions of fans but still maintain certain identity and a normal, private life. You can even go hermit if you want (such as what Thomas Harris and Charles Frazer do).

"A" Is For "Agent"
11-19-2008, 07:11 PM
So the King could be on this very board, and nobody would ever know, except King of course?

Will you please slam your fingers in a door?


And ScarletP, JK's picture is on none of the HP books I own. Is she on the UK versions (all of which I am thinking of buying) ?

scarletpeaches
11-19-2008, 07:12 PM
Her photo covers the back of UK hardback editions. I have 1-5 in pb and the last two I bought in hb as soon as they were published.

DeleyanLee
11-19-2008, 07:15 PM
I hope I'm not derailing this post, but why worry about fame? Why wouldn't you want 10,000 readers reading and liking your book?

10,000 readers isn't "famous". 10,000 is selling out a healthy print-run or few at an NYC publisher. Add a more zeroes in there if you want to start hitting the bottom edge of "famous".

"A" Is For "Agent"
11-19-2008, 07:15 PM
Her photo covers the back of UK hardback editions. I have 1-5 in pb and the last two I bought in hb as soon as they were published.

Oh cool. I have heard there are enough variations in the two versions to buy the UK versions. Have you read the US-issued ones?

scarletpeaches
11-19-2008, 07:16 PM
I haven't and nor would I.

I read a spoof novel once, "Barry Trotter and the Shameless Parody" and got hives at all the talk of 'cellphones' and 'sidewalks' so god knows what the US versions of the HP books would be like.

maestrowork
11-19-2008, 07:18 PM
To be honest, if Rowling walks up next to me right now, I probably wouldn't recognize her.

Now, Angelina Jolie....

What are we talking about?

mscelina
11-19-2008, 07:19 PM
Actually, I own UK, US, and Canadian versions of HP and they're basically the same. The spelling is just geared toward a specific readership--like American kids were incapable of understanding "philosopher" or that 'colour' means 'color.'

There's really no structural difference at all.

scarletpeaches
11-19-2008, 07:22 PM
To be honest, if Rowling walks up next to me right now, I probably wouldn't recognize her.

Now, Angelina Jolie....

What are we talking about?

You stay away from Angelina. She's mine.

"A" Is For "Agent"
11-19-2008, 07:26 PM
You stay away from Angelina. She's mine.

I had no idea you were family.

Soccer Mom
11-19-2008, 07:42 PM
All right, children. Enough derail. Back on topic please...

http://images.icanhascheezburger.com/completestore/2008/5/17/momcatgive128555200553412586.jpg

Phaeal
11-19-2008, 07:46 PM
Cybernaught.

If I read a book about toasters killing people, I'd automatically think the author was on crack anyway.

You obviously are unaware of the terrible dangers toasters pose to people who leave Pop Tarts in there too long. Dave Barry, one of King's close associates, did extensive research on this, ahem, burning topic and PROVED CONCLUSIVELY that overtoasted Pop Tarts are one of the biggest perils our democracy now faces.

BenPanced
11-19-2008, 07:46 PM
Yes. I want to become published just so I can meet guys.

dclary
11-19-2008, 07:53 PM
I believe it was Billy Crystal who said "People always talk about wanting to be rich and famous. But they don't know what they're talking about. Why not see if just being rich takes care of it all for you."

I ask you to consider the career of Madonna. What separates her from the hundreds of other teenie bopper singers who populated the FM dial in the 80s? She generated controversy with her on-stage antics.

What separated her from the myriad pop singers that populated the FM dial in the 90s? She generated controversy with her behind-the-scene antics.

What keeps a just-past-50-year-old woman at the top of a music industry dominated by sexy kittens a third of her age? She creates controversy. Sure, she has a huge number of detractors, far more than most other female singers have. But she generates news, and that keeps her in the spotlight.

If there's a point to this story (and I'm frantically looking for one, since I took the time to write it), it's that fame isn't all it's cracked up to be. But being infamous isn't the stigma it used to be.

Trust me when I say that having your entire life laid bare for the internet community and world to poke through sucks major ass. But at the end of the day, if you can use that to your advantage, you've won. So just be yourself. If it turns out you're an a$$... it's ok. Even a$$ can get some love in today's world.

I'm rambling. I better scram. Someone might be read this someday...

Samantha's_Song
11-19-2008, 11:15 PM
Like the old saying goes, "All publicity is good publicity."

Thomas_Anderson
11-20-2008, 04:34 AM
Will you please slam your fingers in a door?

I didn't say it was likely he was on this board. I was just saying, it's a possibility.

But it is nice to know that the media doesn't know anything more than what you tell them.

mscelina
11-20-2008, 04:39 AM
I didn't say it was likely he was on this board. I was just saying, it's a possibility.

But it is nice to know that the media doesn't know anything more than what you tell them.

Um...I don't think anyone said that. If the media wants to find something out, they will.

We all have a digital signature in this day and age. The best thing to do is to own it and move on.

Thomas_Anderson
11-20-2008, 04:55 AM
True, but nobody cares enough to look into our digital signature on each and every forum. Only for actors and politicians, and even then, not all the time. Nobody is going to care about what Jim Butcher's email address was years before his rise to glory.

Even then, by the time you become important, all the searches would pull up mostly your work, anything would be burried. Not even Google cache keeps things forever.

Medievalist
11-20-2008, 07:00 AM
True, but nobody cares enough to look into our digital signature on each and every forum. Only for actors and politicians, and even then, not all the time. Nobody is going to care about what Jim Butcher's email address was years before his rise to glory.

Even then, by the time you become important, all the searches would pull up mostly your work, anything would be burried. Not even Google cache keeps things forever.

Umm, no, wrong.

Don't put anything on the Internet you don't want on the front page of a major paper.

Cranky
11-20-2008, 07:05 AM
Uh oh. Campy erotica might get me some funny looks, I think. :D

Seriously, though, so long as you don't say anything on the internet you aren't willing to say face-to-face, you should be okay, I think.

Thomas_Anderson
11-20-2008, 07:15 AM
But you guys just said writers don't get the same media spotlight as actors do.

I outgrew my stupidity phase anyway.

Cranky
11-20-2008, 07:25 AM
To clarify: If it worries you, then follow my (and everyone else's) advice. :)

Thomas_Anderson
11-20-2008, 07:27 AM
Got a time machine?

Cranky
11-20-2008, 07:28 AM
Okay, then plead youthful ignorance. :D Seriously, I wouldn't worry about it. Just be mindful going forward.

Personally, I think it's just good policy in general, nevermind potential fame, which is seriously unlikely.

Toothpaste
11-20-2008, 07:34 AM
Right now Thomas it seems to me you feel bad for stuff you did on the internet in the past and are desperately hoping someone here will tell you, "Don't worry about it, it will never come back to haunt you." But we simply can't say that, because there is no way of knowing. It may, it may not. All you can do right now is move on, learn from your mistakes and if it ever does come up, deal with it in the moment. You just can't dwell on it. We all do things we regret. It's life.

scarletpeaches
11-20-2008, 07:37 AM
Hell, worst comes to worst, just say someone used your computer or stole your password to pose as you.

Medievalist
11-20-2008, 08:45 AM
I didn't say it was likely he was on this board. I was just saying, it's a possibility.

But it is nice to know that the media doesn't know anything more than what you tell them.

Yep; it's a possibility.

mscelina
11-20-2008, 09:08 AM
Well, heck. I guess my dirty little secret is out. I've only been pretending to be a smartassed fantasy hack from Ohio.

In reality, I'm an evil horror hack from Maine.

Who'd have thunk it?

:D

Nakhlasmoke
11-20-2008, 09:49 AM
I thought I was Stephen King.


Oh no wait...hmmm wrong country.

I'm JM Coetzee, sercetly indulging my love of emo-tastic speculative fiction.

*derail*

Seriously, do not worry about it. At the speed the publishing industry moves, by the time you become famous all your contemporaries who might remember a few flame wars you took part in will be dead.

Samantha's_Song
11-20-2008, 01:52 PM
OMG! Everyone's going to find out that I'm a dirty-minded and disgusting old bag!... Wait a minute, anyone who knows me and whom I actually care about, already knows that. Phew, no skeletons in my cupboard then, they all sit around drinking coffee with me :D


Don't put anything on the Internet you don't want on the front page of a major paper.

scarletpeaches
11-20-2008, 04:20 PM
I prefer dirty minded old bags, actually. They're just my cup of tea. :D

"A" Is For "Agent"
11-20-2008, 04:25 PM
I outgrew my stupidity phase anyway.

-... . ..-. --- .-. . / --- .-. / .- ..-. - . .-. / -.-- --- ..- / ... - .- .-. - . -.. / - .... .. ... / - .... .-. . .- -.. ..--..

scarletpeaches
11-20-2008, 04:30 PM
Oh, I just remembered my stalkerclone. Whatever happened to scarletpeaches2? That was cool. Not even famous yet and people want to be me...:D

Samantha's_Song
11-20-2008, 07:33 PM
Mwah! Mine too SP. :) Dirty old bags of a feather, flock together... bet you're glad I only said flock though, aren't you :D


I prefer dirty minded old bags, actually. They're just my cup of tea. :D

writehereinOhio
11-20-2008, 07:53 PM
I realize I'm arriving a little late to this party (so many replies!) but Thomas, my (humble) advice is simple: mind your manners and stay true to yourself. These two tenets should keep you safe when rejection and criticism are thrown in your face--and they will be--whether you achieve fame or not.

Thomas_Anderson
11-21-2008, 01:14 AM
-... . ..-. --- .-. . / --- .-. / .- ..-. - . .-. / -.-- --- ..- / ... - .- .-. - . -.. / - .... .. ... / - .... .-. . .- -.. ..--..

Huh?

BlueLucario
11-21-2008, 02:01 AM
Huh?
I believe that is morse code.THat's how my friends and I communicated. Sort of nerdy, but cool.

The Last Knight
11-21-2008, 02:24 AM
-... . ..-. --- .-. . / --- .-. / .- ..-. - . .-. / -.-- --- ..- / ... - .- .-. - . -.. / - .... .. ... / - .... .-. . .- -.. ..--..

It means "Before or after you started this thread?"


Ethan

Thomas_Anderson
11-21-2008, 02:32 AM
Oh, thanks. It was years before I started this thread.

scarletpeaches
11-21-2008, 02:33 AM
Plus, A-is-for-Agent was showing off... ;)