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Branwyn
11-09-2008, 09:40 PM
I'm looking for some phrases and I don't know if I can trust what's on google.

I know I'm going to sound stupid, but--are there curses that are different than the usual?

Do folks really say, "She'll be apples." Meaning everything will be fine?

Chuk a spaz?

Also terms of endearment.

Thanks.

Keyan
11-10-2008, 12:08 AM
One of my Aussie friends actually used to exclaim "Flaming galahs!"

Then he had to explain what galahs were.

And used the term "ratbag" for people he objected to. As in "He's a right ratbag."

This guy was generally clean-spoken, and I assume these are fairly mild.

Stormhawk
11-10-2008, 12:17 AM
"She'll be apples" I haven't heard. o_0

"Chuck a spaz" though, is rather common, and means to throw a tantrum/shitfit. And, though, obviously the word "spaz" is a slang/dimunitive of spastic, it has long evolved past the point where the connotation is there-it's not like using "gay" as a curse because you think those "damn flaming queers" (or whatever) are some lesser form of life.

As to curses, we use all the common ones (sh1t, fsck, bloody hell etc). The C-word, though, is still reserved for extreme situations/people with no sense of what is and what isn't appropriate.

As to all the rhyming-Cockney-esque expressions that we supposedly use, no, just no. (Obviously, there are people who do, but there are also people who think the South will rise again).

Terms of endearment: "darl" is fairly common, especially from openly friendly ("That'll just be a minute, darl, can I grab the next customer" etc), "love" also fits into this category, and is also commonly used between husbands/wives. (It's worth noting that both of these are quite Aussie and therefore a lot of people don't use them. (For example, I can't think of anyone in my family/extended family/circle of friends who uses either).

I call my SO "dear", but that's more the exception than the rule.

Stormhawk
11-10-2008, 12:19 AM
And used the term "ratbag" for people he objected to. As in "He's a right ratbag."

This guy was generally clean-spoken, and I assume these are fairly mild.

Yeah, ratbag is mild - and rather general. My mum used to call guys who drag-raced up the street/drank too much/made too much noise late at night ratbags.

Ms Hollands
11-10-2008, 12:30 AM
It's "She's apples" = whatever has just been explained will work/everything is fine
eg: "You just turn this wheel and she's apples."

Chuck a spaz = was very very angry
eg: "He chucked a spaz when he found out she ate the last chocolate"

Flaming galahs = something Alf Stewart on Home and Away says. Nobody else says it unless they're trying to cash in on being Australian.

Ratbag = someone not above board/someone you don't like

Dead horse = tomato sauce

Bugger = damn

dag = idiot or slight geek, but in a friendly way (also means poo stuck to back of sheep's bums)
eg: "haha, you dag" (after the dag just played a practical joke on his mate that backfired)

bonus! = excellent!

no worries/no worries, mate = everything will be okay

terms of endearment = maate (between blokes), chook (between girls), love...

Branwyn
11-10-2008, 01:11 AM
Thank you! If you think of anymore, especially emotionally charged sayings, I'd be interested.

Mandy-Jane
11-10-2008, 01:36 AM
This is a fairly good site. It might be helpful:

http://www.australiatravelsearch.com.au/trc/slang.html

This one, less so, but still good:

http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html

But please remember, we don't all talk like that!

By the way, as far as "she'll be apples" goes, it was more commonly heard back in the 70's. I'm 41 and I honestly haven't heard that said since I was a kid. "No worries" is much more what you'd hear here today.

Branwyn
11-10-2008, 03:15 AM
The character has been around a long time--so phrases from the past could work.

Thanks for the links.

Joe DePlumber
11-10-2008, 03:39 AM
'ave another piss, mate. (beer)

septic (American) as in tank rhyms with yank
Shiela (female) as in, 'Get da bloody Shiela outta da surf mate, da Shiela's can't surf. Heard that one a lot in Sri Lanka when al the So Cal gals were surfin circles around 'em.
'ow 'bout it, eh? 'ow 'bout it, eh? -- Aussie mates version of foreplay Aussie Shiela told me that one.
try discussion board on Facebook. Lotta mates there can give you all the up-to-date. And they've got a ton of it.

Jo
11-10-2008, 04:48 AM
Here are a couple of threads with similar discussions:

Australian terms of endearment? (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=100006)
Aussies! (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=90007)

:)

Albedo
11-10-2008, 07:21 AM
'ave another piss, mate. (beer)

septic (American) as in tank rhyms with yank
Shiela (female) as in, 'Get da bloody Shiela outta da surf mate, da Shiela's can't surf. Heard that one a lot in Sri Lanka when al the So Cal gals were surfin circles around 'em.
'ow 'bout it, eh? 'ow 'bout it, eh? -- Aussie mates version of foreplay Aussie Shiela told me that one.
try discussion board on Facebook. Lotta mates there can give you all the up-to-date. And they've got a ton of it.

Anyone who says 'sheila' these days is taking the piss, mate. ;)

I've never heard anyone say 'she'll be apples', but I say 'chuck a spaz' all the time. Some more 'urban' terms of endearment you might hear include 'cuz' and 'brah' amongst male friends. Aboriginal and Islander males might call each other 'brother' or 'brudda'. A female short order cook in her 50s with a cigarrette dangling out of her mouth will say 'whaddya want, love?' On the weekend you go out with 'your mates' or 'the boys', or sometimes 'the fellas' or 'chaps'. Don't believe Aussie slang guides that say we say 'cobbers'. Not since 1918, we don't. :) Younger Australians often speak self-consciously in American urban slang, so it might be more realistic to intersperse Americanisms in their speech and not go overboard with the Australianisms.

Branwyn
11-10-2008, 09:52 AM
Thanks.:Hug2:

qwerty
11-10-2008, 10:42 AM
Don't believe Aussie slang guides that say we say 'cobbers'.

Phew - thanks! I'm just about to remove that from one of my character's mouth.

Please, do you still say beaut or bonzer?

JJ Cooper
11-10-2008, 11:00 AM
Phew - thanks! I'm just about to remove that from one of my character's mouth.

Please, do you still say beaut or bonzer?

No.

My novel has Aussie characters, is set in Australia and has very limited amounts of 'slang'. So, why would one set outside of Australia require an Australian character to use slang?

We have character traits that are unique, but apart from the very cool accent, we don't generally go overboard with slang in our day-to-day converstaions. I blame the Crocodile Dundee franchise and the dickheads who export our commercials for the unrealistic portrayals of our language.

And, if you intend to use slang in your novels then there may be a requirement for your characters to explain what it means. Otherwise, you'll confuse the reader and may be left feeling like a goose.

JJ

Jo
11-10-2008, 11:13 AM
Too right. Bloody oath. Oath, mate. Yep. :tongue

Keyan
11-10-2008, 11:26 AM
No.

And, if you intend to use slang in your novels then there may be a requirement for your characters to explain what it means.

JJ

Yeah. We had such a colleague at one place where I worked. Couldn't understand quite a bit of what he said, especially when he got emphatic.

Fortunately, another Aussie colleague would translate.

Long time ago, and in another country. Things may be different now, galahs and all.

cooeedownunder
11-10-2008, 11:43 AM
Yes, some people do say some of the terms Branwyn and the others mentioned, although I don't say them, they are said. The main exception to this is 'g'day' no matter how hard I try not to say it...it just comes out. Its embedded, the same as "bloody". We also have a tendacy to chop off part of our words, but I can't think of any others this second.

A lot of our slang words originated years ago, and I guess many of them we have out grown, except for those Australian's who like to think of themselves as okers, or"true blue" aussies. It is more pravilient in the country areas or elderly people.

I agree with JJ Cooper that I wouldn't use many of the ones mention in a novel. They're not needed and although some are a general part of our every day speach, I think they would be jarring to a reader. I know when I was in the states I got told I sounded like a country girl, yet I was from Australia's largest city. I think the main reason for this was that American's seem to speak much slower. I was told I speak quickly, and to slow down.

As for Paul Hogan at the time of his movies, that speech was very much used to a degree.

If you are trying to capture a little bit of our charachter without jarring you're reader then some of the following would probably be understood universally if put in dialouge the way we use them.

"G'day" and "mate" are probably a couple of the most common words we do say in every day speech.

With the examples you gave, I wouldn't use them, unless your charachter was from the remote country towns of Australia or elderly. My grandmother and some elderly people I come across still use those terms but the terms you mention will not be understood by the masses outside our country...I thinks.

I don't think we have any special cursing words that would be used daily apart from, "bloody bastard", and "bloody" in front of any other curse word you can think of, plus "bugger" but I would use bugger, in a different sense for eg. "Bugger, I almost fell over." or "bugger, I just burnt dinner."

I have pm you one, which I don't think appropiate for the forum, but someone has mentioned the word "piss" in a different context then in the following context.

"Piss off," is an emotionally charged saying and done when angry commonly by both men and women. Eg - a fight "Piss off." Piss meaning get. 'Piss off mate, before I smash you."

A woman fighting with a lover..."Piss off, I've had enough."

The other is "bugger" but used in the following sense.

A boy who skips school..."You are a little bugger."

Another use..."Bugger, I just burnt dinner."

"Bugger, I almost fell down the steps."

"Bloody" - "If you don't get out my sight this bloody second, I'll kill you."

The same is with terms of endearments, but one that comes to mind is "sweetie" or "luvie". My mother and aunts all use "luvie" as in "Luvie, how was your day?" I unconsciously call my husband, 'babe' long before the movie was every released.

A fellow looking at a woman. "Now, that's a hot chick."

qwerty
11-10-2008, 12:49 PM
Thanks for raising this, Branwyn. And thanks for the answers, folks.

Hey, you lot are a bit like us really. We call people love, sweetie and mate too.


A female short order cook in her 50s with a cigarrette dangling out of her mouth will say 'whaddya want, love?'

That woman could be found in a Brit transport caff.

I suppose emulating Paul Hogan is like non-Brits speaking like Jeeves and Wooster. Top hole, what?

cooeedownunder
11-10-2008, 01:23 PM
I think, although I am happy to be corrected, you could have got the usage of the way we use "mate" off us. A bit like we stole barbecue or barbeque off you guys.

Mate is also used as "matey" eg "Matey, lets go down the pub." The Consise Australian National Dictionary gives the first use of the term 1834.

And with love its luv or luvie.

One of the first things that struck me after returning to Australia after being overseas for a month and hearing very few Australian's speak was when we were first got on the Qantas plane was that our accent seemed very strong. We seem to cut off our words...g'day the perfect example.

cooeedownunder
11-10-2008, 02:06 PM
A bit of an after thought but if you want to show how we are different you can probably incorporate our different usage of words more so than slang, and some different perceptions we have of the world or usage of words.

One word that comes to mind is “pub”. Just about any Australian guy who hits your cities will want to go to a pub. Not sure what your equal is, but saloon comes to mind.

Also I drink what we call here, Barcadi and lemonade. This got me in a great deal of trouble when I was in the states because I was served barcadi and what I call cordial. I soon learnt to ask for barcadi and 7Up.

Another thing is when I went to Disney Land or any place where there were lines of people, I soon learnt that if I got into the left hand line it moved quicker because most Americans were lined up on the right hand side. Also your toilets flush the opposite way, and I think your door switches may also be on the other side then here. I can remember not being able to get your showers to work in one place, and once we were shown it was very simple.

My girlfriend drove, and couldn’t stop hitting the wipers instead of the blinkers, and turning down the wrong side of the roads. And my last thought is one fellow smoking American smokes which were much thicker and longer than ours, and I said it tasted like “cow shit” and he asked me what a cow was. My response, because I was totally bewildered with his question was, “probably something like a baffolo”

bergalia
11-10-2008, 02:52 PM
Interestingly the term 'Dinkum' - still used down here in the Far South Coast of NSW - has its origins in China. Two words 'din kum' (true gold) lifted from the Chinese labourers who flooded the country during the various gold rushes.
My favourite is still that 'un-politically correct' term for a bowel evacuation - to 'straddle a darkie.'

Mandy-Jane
11-10-2008, 02:59 PM
My favourite is still that 'un-politically correct' term for a bowel evacuation - to 'straddle a darkie.'

Or my favourite "to back one out" - I love it!

qwerty
11-10-2008, 03:20 PM
Ahah! Now we're getting into the serious business, I can say this has been translated for me on another thread:

If you don’t whip your daks up rapidly, a blowie will fossick through your grundies and assault your freckle.

A pub is a pub in UK. A bar in France, and I think the same in USA.

cooeedownunder
11-10-2008, 03:22 PM
Yes, girls we are fair 'dinkum' aussies. Maybe the term come from the gold rush days somewhere? Maybe the it has something to do with dimsum...oh, acutally dim sim.

cooeedownunder
11-10-2008, 03:25 PM
Gwerty - where is Burgundy? or is it your favourite colour?

chevbrock
11-10-2008, 04:11 PM
I believe f**kwit is a uniquely Australian curse. Means pretty much what it sounds like - a complete idiot.

My dear other half commented on some particular girls having had "more pricks than a second-hand dartboard". I've got a few more of those, if that's the sort of thing you're looking for.

qwerty
11-10-2008, 04:23 PM
Gwerty - where is Burgundy? or is it your favourite colour?

Burgundy is slap bang in the middle of France.

Don't know if Oz has the same keyboard formation, but qwerty (beginning with Q) is the keyboard I use.

scarletpeaches
11-10-2008, 04:24 PM
I believe f**kwit is a uniquely Australian curse. Means pretty much what it sounds like - a complete idiot...

Au contraire, mon ami. I used that word in a thread title once and got modspanked for it - and I'm Scottish.

qwerty
11-10-2008, 04:31 PM
chevbrock, I came across f***kwit for the first time in Bridget Jones Diary. I'm happy to attribute it to Oz though.

I like your DOH's analogy. I've been known to say something is as useful as a perforated condom.

Oh how I miss the uninhibited chats I used to have with Ozzies in Brunei.

cooeedownunder
11-11-2008, 02:29 AM
Burgundy is slap bang in the middle of France.

Don't know if Oz has the same keyboard formation, but qwerty (beginning with Q) is the keyboard I use.

No we have Q i was just reading your name wrong...sorry qwerty

Branwyn
11-11-2008, 02:55 AM
I believe f**kwit is a uniquely Australian curse. Means pretty much what it sounds like - a complete idiot.

My dear other half commented on some particular girls having had "more pricks than a second-hand dartboard". I've got a few more of those, if that's the sort of thing you're looking for.
Yes!!!! I love it!

waylander
11-11-2008, 03:35 AM
I believe f**kwit is a uniquely Australian curse. Means pretty much what it sounds like - a complete idiot.

My dear other half commented on some particular girls having had "more pricks than a second-hand dartboard". I've got a few more of those, if that's the sort of thing you're looking for.

Don't know who stole this from who but
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Fuckwitt

Albedo
11-11-2008, 07:57 AM
I think I first saw someone mention this in a prevous thread on this board. A great way to hear contemporary Australian speech is to listen to one of the many free streaming radio stations the ABC (http://www.abc.net.au/streaming/) provides.

ReallyRong
11-13-2008, 04:07 AM
Hi Branwyn,

Don't listen to any of these Aussie ockers! Believe it or not, there's actually a board that regularly vote for the most imaginative form of spoken English around the world, and Australian slang wins every time. Whether or not people actually use it in everyday language or not, I take my hat off to phrases like "If it was raining palaces you'd get hit by a dunny door" (A dunny being an outside toilet from the old days), to "You look like a pox doctor's clerk" (you're overly dressed in a bad way) or to be "More tired than a one armed cabbie with the crabs". (nuff said). And whatever happened to "Ripper" or "You beaut"?

It may be about as true as Londoners going around saying "Apples and Pears" to each other, but I'd use it! It didn't stop Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins...

scarletpeaches
11-13-2008, 04:08 AM
I just love all Australian accents. I want to marry an Aussie. If Darren Hayes decides he likes women, I'm in.

Neil Robertson's hot as hell, too and maybe if Quinten Hann wasn't such a sex pest...

Actually, wait...that'd be cool...

Mandy-Jane
11-13-2008, 04:23 AM
Nuh. Darren Hayes is mine.

scarletpeaches
11-13-2008, 04:29 AM
Ah fights u, bitch. :rant:

Mandy-Jane
11-13-2008, 04:35 AM
:tongue

cooeedownunder
11-13-2008, 04:37 AM
Girls, girls, trust me when I say, some aussie fellows would drive you insane. I consider I married a good guy the second time around, but he doesn't talk like crocodile dundee, but my first husband did talk like steve irvin or the crocodile hunter but I couldn't stand it. American men are much more smother than our aussie fellows. Come to a bar here, and most aussies guy's won't approach you till five minutes before the bar closes. Walk into an American bar, and men almost jump on you, but in a polite way.

scarletpeaches
11-13-2008, 04:38 AM
To be serious for a moment - only a moment, mind - I've had a few conversations about dating with a female American friend recently and I find my natural tendency is to date the American way. I much prefer U.S. guys' way of doing things than Scots, that's for sure.

So. I need a guy who acts like an American and sounds like an Aussie.

cooeedownunder
11-13-2008, 04:43 AM
I think one of the differences I noticed between Australian men and American men was that American men seemed appear more like ladies men, where many Australian men come across as men's men (not gay) but what I am trying to say becomes obvious if you attend many barbecues in Australia. The women sit around talking about the men, and the men stand around the barbecue talking about sports, cars, fishing, and how many bears they can drink before their sick (lol only joking)

scarletpeaches
11-13-2008, 04:46 AM
There's a mod round these parts who's an American living in Australia...:e2brows:

Mandy-Jane
11-13-2008, 05:32 AM
Yes but he doesn't meet your criteria about sounding like an Aussie. (I guess)

waylander
11-13-2008, 01:57 PM
The women sit around talking about the men, and the men stand around the barbecue talking about sports, cars, fishing, and how many bears they can drink before their sick (lol only joking)


They drink bears!?
No wonder they talk funny

cooeedownunder
11-13-2008, 02:47 PM
They drink bears!?
No wonder they talk funny

Our men are tough. I've known a few that drink beer, spirits, and shots in one sitting.http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon10.gif Might be why they don't have the reputation as the best lovers in the world. But who ever took the surveys obviously never spoke to a sober women.

Jo
11-13-2008, 02:51 PM
It's not just the men who're tough. I've been known to sink a few beers, spirits and shots in one sitting... er... swaggering. ;)


They drink bears!? Yeah, that's one sure way to get rid of the drop bears around here.

chevbrock
11-13-2008, 02:57 PM
No, Kiwis drink Bears! :)

chevbrock
11-13-2008, 03:07 PM
Oh, Branwyn, a few of my favourite "Aussie isms" for you:

Useless as - tits on a bull, pockets on a singlet (old people use this a lot), an ashtray on a motorbike.

"It's worth two knobs of sheep shit" (worthless)

"He was carrying on like a girl with no pants on" (a grown man chucking a tantrum)

"He's had more starts than Paleface Adios" (can't hold a job - Paleface Adios was a trotting horse in the eighties (???) and I believe he still holds the record for the most starts in his career)

"He did the Harold Holt" (Rhyming slang - did the bolt. It's also works because one of our Prime Ministers, Harold Holt, disappeared while swimming at a beach in Victoria)

"He wouldn't know if a bus was up him/ a band was up him and the drum was playing" (completely oblivious)

"As rare as chook's teeth/ rocking horse shit"

And that classic line from the movie "Kenny" - "Busier than a one-armed bricklayer in Baghdad"

I'm sure there are others who can come up with much better.

Ms Hollands
11-13-2008, 04:25 PM
I was just chatting to my friend in Aus. It's the nuances that you want to get right in what your Aussie character says, rather than the phrases. For example, she used (more than once):

Grouse = great
Heaps = loads/lots of
Oh look (before actual sentence) = listen to me because my following sentence mirrors my sentiments on this subject perfectly, and I feel as though they might mirror yours too (yes, this is long-winded and I'm being a bit silly, but 'Oh look,' is used to start many sentences)

I still do like the phrase that "he's one brick short of the BBQ" (ie, he's a bit stupid).

Albedo
11-13-2008, 04:54 PM
We also say 'thanks' when other people would say 'please'. e.g. "I'll have a glass of water, thanks."

Jo
11-13-2008, 05:08 PM
And the reply to that would probably be:

"No worries."

JJ Cooper
11-13-2008, 05:29 PM
Some creative videos depicting Aussie blokes.

The Woman Whisperer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7Z2gKT7B6Y)

Sensitive Aussie Bloke (http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RqrdRqAr1Q)

Aussie Bloke (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4x9EVHhRwY)

Aussie Bloke in Spa (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=he4fBK3d8hk&feature=related)

JJ

ReallyRong
11-13-2008, 05:38 PM
Here's my favourite Aussie bloke video. It's an old ad, but it still cracks me up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DcOnqDLeAMs

Branwyn
11-13-2008, 08:06 PM
These are awesome.

I was trying to think of that saying about tits on a bull other day. I couldn't remember.

There'a a saying that may come from Brooklyn--I'm not totally sure: If the Queen had balls she'd be King.(meaning yeah--so what?) But maybe it's Aussie.

Thanks so much. The everyday uses are very helpful.

And have no worries--this guy's a manly man, his version of a BBQ is hell.;)

Ms Hollands
11-14-2008, 03:27 AM
Heheh, those ads are brilliant (Sensitive Aussie Bloke link doesn't work though).

I've never heard that Queen-balls-King saying before, so maybe it's not an Aussie-ism.

Blokes do the BBQing in Aus. Snags are what we call sausages.

I just spent about an hour trying to find a good youtube with a good Aussie accent but all I could come up with was Poider (a bogan acted by Eric Bana) and various stuff from Fast Forward and Full Frontal, but they all have sayings that are their own, rather than Aussieisms. Pity.

Manny
11-14-2008, 05:08 AM
There are bunch of Ozzie guys on our forum, and they just recently started an "Ozzie Dictionary" topic because the Yanks and the Brits were complaining that they spoke their own language.

The topic is here (http://ruadventures.com/forum/index.php?topic=4982.0) if it is useful to you.

cooeedownunder
11-14-2008, 07:50 AM
I thinks we speak an Australian version of English