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Deccydiva
10-11-2008, 02:53 PM
If you make jam, pour it into the jars and find the next day that it didn't set... can you re-boil it?

L M Ashton
10-11-2008, 05:07 PM
Yes.

I'd suggest first figuring out why it didn't set and rectifying that, though. :)

Deccydiva
10-11-2008, 05:34 PM
Thanks. It's a recipe from a website which I was trying out, it doesn't say how long to boil for - I followed all the other instructions to the letter (and minute).

L M Ashton
10-11-2008, 05:46 PM
Got it. :)

I've read such instructions - years ago - but never used that method. I always added pectin for jam since it's easier and more predictable. I'm wondering if there's some kind of a test to go by, like the soft ball stage, for example.

Appalachian Writer
10-11-2008, 05:49 PM
I'll ask my mother, the champion of all jam and jelly. She'll know. I always use "Sure-Jel". The best jams and jellies I ever made came from the recipe on the box. I don't know if you can get it where you live, but it's a great product. They must have some equivalent in Ireland. Good jamming. :D

L M Ashton
10-11-2008, 05:52 PM
Here' (http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/fcs3/fcs3331/fcs3331.htm)s some basic info that might help. It includes a lot of basic canning information as well, but also some basics on your method (no added pectin) of jam making. Ah, it also has this:



Sea Level 220
1000 Feet 218
2000 Feet 216
3000 Feet 214
Degrees F

I used search terms of "jam gelling canning" to get that. Good luck! :)

kikazaru
10-11-2008, 07:12 PM
Yes you can reboil it, but what I would do is stick it in the fridge for a few days to see if it does set - sometimes it takes longer. If you do reboil it be prepared to have less, since more liquid will evaporate concentrating the product.

What kind of jam are you making? The reason I ask is that some fruit have more natural pectin in them, making a commercial pectin product unnecessary. Crabapple and apple and sour fruits like gooseberry or currents have a high amount of natural pectin so you don't need any, but softer fruits like strawberry, peach etc you do.

I have a candy thermometer which I use to make sure that the mix has reached the proper temperature for jelly and then I start testing (some fruits take longer than others). Start by sticking your spoon in the boiling liquid, removing it hold it vertical, watch the drops fall. One indication is if the jelly is falling in a steady stream it's not ready, but once the last few drops on the spoon start falling slower and two drops bead together then it most likely is done.

Another test is to take it from the heat and let it sit for a moment, run your spoon lightly over the surface and if it picks up a "skin" then it's more than likely done.

You could also stick a saucer in the freezer and when you think that it may be done, pour a teaspoon (from a bit of a height) on it, let it sit for a moment on the cold plate and then tilt the plate - if the edge of the pool has a "rim" then it's good to go. I often use all three methods.

Don't give up, and even if it never gels properly, it will make a beautiful syrup for ice cream or crepes/pancakes.

Deccydiva
10-11-2008, 07:14 PM
Never heard of "sure jel". Many products I expect to find in the UK are not available here so no chance for anything more far flung, I go over the border every so often to buy them (like crumpets!).
The sugar is called jam sugar and comprises sugar, apple pectin, citric acid and glycerol (so it won't freeze lol). I looked on the instruction on that packet (not the recipe) and it said boil 1 minute for syrup (which is what I ended up with) and four minutes for jam. I've given it a good hard boil for a few minutes and poured in back in the jars which have been scalded with boiling water first. It actually looks a richer colour and is more even - as syrup it got darker towards the bottom of the jar where the fine particles of rose hip had settled.
The smell is glorious. My mother used to give me rose hip syrup as a young child, so all of a sudden about 50 years rolled away.

Unique
10-12-2008, 03:30 PM
What kind of jam are you making? The reason I ask is that some fruit have more natural pectin in them, making a commercial pectin product unnecessary. Crabapple and apple and sour fruits like gooseberry or currents have a high amount of natural pectin so you don't need any, but softer fruits like strawberry, peach etc you do.



You can boil the skins of those fruits w/any other fruit to extract the pectin - then fish them out of the finished product. It's a little more time consuming but it's worked for me in the past.

I've had trouble sealing with wax in the hot, humid South but wax worked fine up in Yankeeland. Clean lids and rings are a must down South.

There are all sorts of airborne contaminants that you don't want in your jams & jellies. Mold looks bad even if it isn't the type that will kill ya. :(