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gophergrrrl
10-09-2008, 11:31 PM
My protag is planning to steal some medications from her 70 something year old grandmother. So, could someone give me three (or more) kinds of prescription pills that would be common to find in an elderly person's possession, and yet would still be appealing to a drug addict?

vixey
10-09-2008, 11:37 PM
Both my parents are 70. My dad is on Coumadin (blood thinner for angina - he recently had a heart attack). Mom's on Lipitor (cholesterol medication). They're both on high blood pressure medication (not sure which one/s) but you could google one of those.

ETA: I have no idea if these are appealing to a drug addict.

I knew of someone's husband who was addicted to pain killers. You might not find these in "grandma's" cabinet. Your character could steal from anyone's medicine cabinet for those.

Roger J Carlson
10-09-2008, 11:44 PM
Vicodin (Hydrocodone), OxyContin (oxycodone). Both are pain-relievers and narcotics. My mother-in-law took these after hip and knee surgery. Ativan or Temesta (Lorazepam) is a anti-anxiety drug. Then there's always the old standby Valium (Diazepam). In fact, just about any sedative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedative) would be a good fit.

vixey
10-09-2008, 11:44 PM
OK - rememberd something else.

My father-in-law had Vicodin in his cabinet, but I'm not sure why. He died at 84 of leukemia. I remember when we were dividing up his things how irritated we all were that my mother-in-law had thrown that one out. ;P

Clair Dickson
10-09-2008, 11:46 PM
Gramma might have Vicodin or OxyContin from hip or knee surgery or something.

ETA: HA! Cross posted with Roger AND vixey!

gophergrrrl
10-10-2008, 12:07 AM
Thanks so much guys! And thanks for the super quick reply. =o]

If anyone wants to add anything else, go ahead. I'm going to need lots of other scary and fascinating drugs that an out of control teen might come across.

Clair Dickson
10-10-2008, 12:09 AM
You could always have 'em stealing the Robotussin. This is usually for younger teens, but Robotripping is another way kids get high.

Roger J Carlson
10-10-2008, 12:11 AM
Vicodin is scary for a couple of reasons. First of all, it's a narcotic. But secondly, it has acetaminophen (Tylenol) in it, which when used in excess can damage the liver and kidneys.

gophergrrrl
10-10-2008, 12:24 AM
Ok, here's a question. Percosets (sp?)... what are they and are they used for highs by addicts? If so, do you think it's possible that they would snort them?

I feel weird trying to get this info on the net because I'm afraid the government will line tap me and think I'm doing my homework for other reasons. Seriously, I hate drugs and I was a very sheltered child, so I know very little about any of it.

lemonhead
10-10-2008, 12:32 AM
Percaset made my mom a TRIP. She was wandering around the grocery store with me practically on top of the world one minute and then almost crying another minute. And she wouldn't stop talking about my wedding, even though I wasn't engaged or anything yet.

She told me afterwards she would never take it again. lol. She only had it becuase she had to have a root canal and they couldn't get her in fast enough.

stormie
10-10-2008, 12:35 AM
Yep. Percocet can do weird things to people. The one most kids use around here is OxyContin. Get it from their parents/grandparents. Unfortunately, two of the suicides came from using Oxy and alcohol. Were near the RR tracks (two separate incidents). One's response time was too slow and couldn't move fast enough, the other purposefully threw himself in front of the train.

StephanieFox
10-10-2008, 12:42 AM
I have a real estate license. When I have open houses, I tell my clients to get all their prescription drugs out of the house, or at least locked away. It's not just the 'fun' drugs people are looking to steal. Drugs are very expensive. Even blood pressure meds or other 'benign' kids of drugs can bring money on the black market, sold to the uninsured who need the drugs for their health but who cannot afford them.

This, of course, doesn't happen in places outside the USA, where there is some sort of universal health care.

stormie
10-10-2008, 12:46 AM
I feel weird trying to get this info on the net because I'm afraid the government will line tap me and think I'm doing my homework for other reasons.
LOL!--*no worse than when I queried several different boards (not here at AW) about an effective way to kill a person with a ball point pen. (A sharp jab to the temple.)

ETA: *For a story I was writing :D

TerzaRima
10-10-2008, 12:55 AM
If Grandma has Alzheimer's, she might be on one of the benzodiazepines--Ativan, Valium, etc.--for agitation. Those could have some value for an addict.

Mike Martyn
10-10-2008, 01:13 AM
LOL!--*no worse than when I queried several different boards (not here at AW) about an effective way to kill a person with a ball point pen. (A sharp jab to the temple.

ETA: *For a story I was writing :D

Or when I commented on the use of an ordinary light bulb filled with gasoline as an incendiary device!

Seriously folks, are any of you Al Quida?

RJK
10-10-2008, 01:27 AM
"They" are probably watching me, considering all the weird Google searches I do to research my crime novels. Poisons, sniper rifles, anatomy, bombs, etc.

Deb Kinnard
10-10-2008, 01:29 AM
I can't think why anyone would want some of the more common drugs Gran might take. I'm on Lipitor, and it doesn't do a thing except lower your cholesterol. I feel no different when I forget to take it, than when I remember.

But any of the more common oral prescription psychoactives (Valium, Halcion, Ambien, Abilify, Percocet, Darvocet) might attract a teenager. Painkillers are always popular because of their tranquilizing effects.

If you need more detail, there is an online version of the Physicians' Desk Reference or PDR that will give you drugs by class and by name. Warning:it's very technical but should help you decide if a drug is oral (p.o.), injectable (i.m.) or intravenous (i.v.).

benbradley
10-10-2008, 01:48 AM
Vicodin is scary for a couple of reasons. First of all, it's a narcotic. But secondly, it has acetaminophen (Tylenol) in it, which when used in excess can damage the liver and kidneys.
There are MANY drugs (over the counter as well as prescription) that when "taken to excess" or taken over a period of time can damage internal organs, especially the liver (which is where many "foreign substances" are filtered from the bloodstream and broken down into simpler substances to be excreted from the body). Liver problems are common among long-term drug abusers as well as long-term heavy drinkers.

But such detrimental health effects usually only occur after years of use.

virtue_summer
10-10-2008, 02:05 AM
If the grandmother is disabled and in chronic pain for something she might be prescribed Methadone. It's a very strong pain medication. It's also used sometimes with people who are drug addicts to manage their addictions while they're weaned off of the drugs. Because it's so strong itself, though, it holds it's own possibilities for addiction.

Smiling Ted
10-10-2008, 02:19 AM
I have a real estate license. When I have open houses, I tell my clients to get all their prescription drugs out of the house, or at least locked away. It's not just the 'fun' drugs people are looking to steal. Drugs are very expensive. Even blood pressure meds or other 'benign' kids of drugs can bring money on the black market, sold to the uninsured who need the drugs for their health but who cannot afford them.

This, of course, doesn't happen in places outside the USA, where there is some sort of universal health care.

Stephie-

I want universal health care too, but that sort of off-hand generalization is best left to the Sarah Palins of the world.

Even in those few countries that do have adequate universal health coverage (basically, the EU, Canada, and a few other developed countries) patients often still have to pay for prescription drugs. Or they may not be covered for the drugs that are best for their condition, because there's an older, cheaper, less effective one available.

So there are black markets in other countries. Even full National Health systems often have a lot of problems - doctor availability, drug availability, facilities availability. Often there's a second tier of care for customers with ca$h. It's much better than what we've got right now, but it's not perfect.

TerzaRima
10-10-2008, 02:21 AM
Some older people with mild cognitive impairment and/or dementia are prescribed Ritalin and related medications, and those tend to be a hot ticket as well.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
10-10-2008, 02:22 AM
If granny ever had any kind of surgery, including dental, it's likely she's got the most popular painkillers. Doctors just love handing that crap out like candy and granny either won't take it at all 'cause she's tough, or she'll take one or two and have two dozen or so stuck in the medicine cabinet.

Smiling Ted
10-10-2008, 02:23 AM
Folks often save drugs that they were prescribed but didn't use.
Your character could be stealing Darvocets from ten years ago.

Mike Martyn
10-10-2008, 02:41 AM
Come to think about it, we have several hundred tabs of codeine kicking around. It was prescribed by our vet for our border collie for pain during her last few months of terminal cancer. That's a lot of codeine.

So vet meds are also a quirky option.

stormie
10-10-2008, 03:33 AM
^^Yep, good one!^^

Ms Hollands
10-10-2008, 03:53 AM
Yeah, actually, we had a cat on valium once. He was a grumpy bugger, and the valium (given temporarily for other reasons) was GREAT! We could actually pat him without him hissing at us.

Hummingbird
10-10-2008, 09:20 AM
I'm not sure if you can get high off of it but they could have Prednisone. It's a steriod.

It helps with inflimation of arthritus and gives the body a boost to fight off crud such as an autoimmune disease. If you are taking it regularly and go cold turkey you could give yourself a heart attack though.

Chrisla
10-10-2008, 10:19 AM
Shingles is painful, and might result in a prescription for Oxycontin (sp?)

GeorgeK
10-12-2008, 10:43 PM
So vet meds are also a quirky option.

There's not enough market for pharmaceutical companies to specifically research animal drugs so anything your vet can get for your pet or livestock is stuff that was originally in the testing for people. Maybe it's old stuff trying to find a new market. Maybe it's new stuff that failed drug trials in humans.

gophergrrrl
10-13-2008, 09:44 PM
LOL!--*no worse than when I queried several different boards (not here at AW) about an effective way to kill a person with a ball point pen. (A sharp jab to the temple.)

ETA: *For a story I was writing


Or when I commented on the use of an ordinary light bulb filled with gasoline as an incendiary device!

Wow... now I really would be too afraid of the federalies when it comes to looking up bombs. I've heard that if you search a few certain particular things, that the gov watches you for seven years. Of course, I also believe that our gov is into bluffing and using scare tactics... propaganda. Who knows? Could be true. It only takes being right once to make paranoia worthwhile. haha XD

Maybe writers should be allowed to drop by the local courthouse and pick up a liscense that gives us permission to search questionable things and not be hauled off to the pokey for it! haha...

Anyway, I love all of this information. I've read every post, and I'm writing down a list of all drugs mentioned and using your breif descriptions, tidbits of experiences, etc as side notes for the drug.

In my story, I have Roth (the protagonist) stealing the diazepam and oxycontin from her grandma's huge old lady purse. So, I'm going to do some research on the diazepam to make sure that its something that a real druggie would choose over all the other various drugs in grandma's purse.

Also, does anyone know anything about kolonopin? I know I didn't spell it right... And yes, I could google it, but I'd like to have some info from individuals, not just random articles from around the net.

Thanks so much for all of the help! If anyone can think of any other kind of drug, please throw me some more info out there. I'm going to need some ideas for street drugs soon, as my main character hits the road and will be encountering hookers, pimps, street dealers, etc.

In the meantime, I'll be re-watching Fear And Loathing a few more times.

Ms Hollands
10-14-2008, 02:17 AM
Oxycontin is definitely the drug for that then! Courtney Love will vouch for that. I think it's called Oxycodone in the states though. Oxycontin is its UK (possibly European too) name. Perdue produce it in the states (they rose to fame with Betadine!). It's Napp in the UK. And It's Mundipharma in Europe.

It's most commonly used for cancer patients, and those suffering moderate to high levels of chronic pain who have problems with morphine. It's a slow-release drug that abusers crush so that it's one hit (instead of its intended 8 or so hours of pain relief when swollowed hole). Make sure grandma has a suitable form of pain. Arthritis *may* work, but you might want to check. I have in the past has associations with the manufacturers, and it was mostly touted as cancer pain relief for those unable to swallow lots of tablets. The company (at least in the UK, and I'm sure in the US too) has separate arthritis pain relief that might be just as useful to a druggy. If you go to their website, I'm sure the brand names and further info will be available.

gophergrrrl
10-14-2008, 03:14 AM
Oxycontin is definitely the drug for that then! Courtney Love will vouch for that. I think it's called Oxycodone in the states though. Oxycontin is its UK (possibly European too) name. Perdue produce it in the states (they rose to fame with Betadine!). It's Napp in the UK. And It's Mundipharma in Europe.

April, unfortunately oxycontin is a drug I'm very familiar with. I'm from Eastern Kentucky (in the US of course) and around here, it's a big deal. It's practically taken this entire tri-state region down, single handedly. Sure, there are other drugs on the street, but this is the one that seems to be the drug of choice for anyone and everyone. I think, according to our county judge executive, four out of five house holds in this region are abusing the drug these days.

People here can easily get it, (and just as easily sell it on the street), prescribed by their doctors for minor pains and aches, (yeah, even the minor stuff!) and if you visit the dentist, you're sure to get a bottle of it. I had some dental work done and the dentist prescribed it to me, and I told him that I didn't want the prescription and I would not be filling it. (He made me take it anyway, though I tore it up shortly after walking out his door.)

You can spot the users in this area, which is also nearly everyone you see when you step outside your door, because they begin to lose their teeth, their facial structure becomes skeletal and thin, and if they're really hitting it hard, they get what these people here call "cotton itch". (I think that's hilarious because they actually think the drug is 'oxycotton' *rolls eyes*) 'Cotton itch' is when those big blistery nasty zombie-looking boils and blisters come up on their face, and they sit and pick at them.

Seriously, these people look worse than any living dead that Romero ever put on film.

It's sad to say, but this beautiful region that I call home is eaten up alive by these walking dead looking imbeciles. I wish I could mow through them with a chainsaw like on the game Dead Rising.

Thank you for the info, though. I just thought that I would add in what I know about the stuff. =o]

Entropy Perk
10-14-2008, 07:50 AM
While its good to look up the actual names for the drugs in question, if you want to write about people who use and trade them, look up what they call them.

Vikes, rather than Vicodin. Chiva, rather than morphine (heroin). yadda, yadda...

Also, the hustle of a trade or sale. How they talk it over. How they pass over a buyer to someone else. All that. Then there is knowing, if they cannot get the drug they want, what they will first ask for instead. No Oxy, then they check for Vikes. No Vicodin, then most ask for Codine. No Codine, then they look for muscle relaxants or downers, Valium or Xanax. They want to ween off of one, they ask for something lessor. Need to get off a random speed high, Xanax. Need to slow down on Oxy, valium. The long term, smarter user, switches up for longish periods, so their tolerance goes down for their fav drugs. Once that is fully done, they can start using it again, and spend less for the high they want.

Leva
10-14-2008, 07:57 AM
For an elderly woman, sleep aids might also be prescribed. Ambien (zolpidem), Halcion, and temazepam are common ones. Stadol is also a possibility, and the nasal spray form is wickedly addictive.

If Grandma has serious pain, Actiq -- a narcotic delivered in lollipop form -- is also a possibility, and they're something a kid might go for. They're *really* expensive, too.

Prednisone, as someone mentioned above, can also have some interesting effects. It's a moderately strong stimulant -- about like three or four expressos all at once. My response to it -- I take it for rheumatoid arthritis and asthma -- tends to be a massive housecleaning frenzy. Zoooooooooom! Wheee! Hyper!

-- Leva